96th Academy Awards

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

96th Academy Awards
Official poster for the 96th Academy Awards
Official poster
DateMarch 10, 2024
SiteDolby Theatre
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A
Hosted byJimmy Kimmel
Preshow hosts
Produced by
  • Raj Kapoor
  • Katy Mullan
  • Molly McNearney[2]
Directed byHamish Hamilton
Highlights
Best PictureOppenheimer
Most awardsOppenheimer (7)
Most nominationsOppenheimer (13)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
Duration3 hours, 23 minutes[3]
Ratings

The 96th Academy Awards ceremony, which was presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), took place on March 10, 2024, at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles.[6] During the gala, the AMPAS presented Academy Awards (commonly referred to as Oscars) in 23 categories honoring films released in 2023. Comedian Jimmy Kimmel hosted the show for the fourth time.[a]

The nominations were announced on January 23, 2024. Oppenheimer led with 13 nominations, followed by Poor Things and Killers of the Flower Moon with 11 and 10, respectively.[8][9][10] Oppenheimer won a leading seven awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.[11] Other major winners were Poor Things with four awards and The Zone of Interest with two. The films which won one award each include American Fiction, Anatomy of a Fall, Barbie, The Boy and the Heron, Godzilla Minus One, The Holdovers, The Last Repair Shop, 20 Days in Mariupol, War Is Over!, and The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar. The telecast drew 19.5 million viewers in the United States, becoming the most watched awards show since 2020.[12]

The Academy held its 14th annual Governors Awards ceremony, hosted by John Mulaney, at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Ovation Hollywood on January 9, 2024.[13] The Academy Scientific and Technical Awards were presented by host Natasha Lyonne on February 23, 2024, at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles.[14]

Winners and nominees[edit]

The nominees for the 96th Academy Awards were announced on January 23, 2024, by actors Zazie Beetz and Jack Quaid at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.[6][15][16] The winners were announced during the awards ceremony on March 10, 2024.[6]

The cultural phenomenon of "Barbenheimer" received a total of twenty-one nominations (eight for Barbie and thirteen for Oppenheimer). The two films competed against each other in six categories, including Best Picture.[9][17][18]

Several notable nominees include Steven Spielberg, who extended his record for the most Best Picture nominations to thirteen;[19] Martin Scorsese, who received his tenth nomination for Best Director, and became the oldest nominee in the category;[b][20] Thelma Schoonmaker, who received her ninth nomination for Best Film Editing;[22] composer John Williams, who received his 54th nomination;[23][24] and Willie D. Burton, who received his eighth nomination as a below-the-line crew member.[23][25][26]

Ten actors received their first Oscar nominations this year.[27] The acting nominees included portrayals from three openly LGBTQ+ actors: Colman Domingo, Jodie Foster, and Lily Gladstone.[28][29] Gladstone also became the first Native American actress to be nominated.[30][31] Scott George, who wrote the music and lyrics to "Wahzhazhe (A Song for My People)", became the first member of the Osage Nation to be nominated for an Academy Award.[32]

This was the fifth consecutive year with at least one Best Picture nominee directed by a woman: Greta Gerwig with Barbie, Celine Song with Past Lives, and Justine Triet with Anatomy of a Fall.[33][34] Triet also became the eighth woman nominated for Best Director.[35][36] Overall, six couples received nominations that they shared together in their respective categories.[37]

Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell won Best Original Song, becoming the youngest two-time Oscar winners in history (22 and 26 years, respectively), having previously won the award in 2022.[38] Killers of the Flower Moon became Scorsese's third film to be nominated in ten or more categories and not win a single award, after Gangs of New York (2002) and The Irishman (2019).[39] The Zone of Interest became the first British film to win the International Feature category.[40]

Godzilla Minus One became the first Japanese[c] and non-English language film to win the Best Visual Effects category.[44][45] Director Hayao Miyazaki, at the age of 83, became the oldest director to win Best Animated Feature for The Boy and the Heron.[46] Additionally, The Boy and the Heron became the first PG-13 animated film to win Best Animated Feature; all of the previous winners were rated G or PG.[47]

Awards[edit]

.
Christopher Nolan, Best Picture co-winner and Best Director winner
.
Cillian Murphy, Best Actor winner
.
Emma Stone, Best Actress winner
.
Robert Downey Jr., Best Supporting Actor winner
.
Da'Vine Joy Randolph, Best Supporting Actress winner
Justine Triet and Arthur Harari, Best Original Screenplay winners
.
Mstyslav Chernov, Best Documentary Feature Film co-winner
.
Jonathan Glazer, Best International Feature Film winner
Hayao Miyazaki and Toshio Suzuki, Best Animated Feature winners
.
Wes Anderson, Best Live Action Short co-winner
.
Ludwig Göransson, Best Original Score winner
Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell, Best Original Song winners
.
Hoyte van Hoytema, Best Cinematography winner
.
Takashi Yamazaki, Best Visual Effects co-winner

Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface, and indicated with a double dagger (‡).[48]

Governors Awards[edit]

The Academy held its 14th annual Governors Awards ceremony on January 9, 2024,[d] which was hosted by John Mulaney, during which the following awards were presented:[13][49][50]

Academy Honorary Awards[edit]

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award[edit]

Films with multiple nominations and awards[edit]

Presenters and performers[edit]

The following presented awards and performed musical numbers.[55]

Presenters
Name(s) Role
David Alan Grier Served as announcer for the 96th Academy Awards
Jamie Lee Curtis
Regina King
Rita Moreno
Lupita Nyong'o
Mary Steenburgen
Presented the award for Best Supporting Actress
Chris Hemsworth
Anya Taylor-Joy
Presented the awards for Best Animated Short Film and Best Animated Feature Film
Melissa McCarthy
Octavia Spencer
Presented the awards for Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay
Michael Keaton
Catherine O'Hara
Presented the awards for Best Makeup and Hairstyling and Best Production Design
John Cena Presented the award for Best Costume Design
Bad Bunny
Dwayne Johnson
Presented the award for Best International Feature Film
Emily Blunt
Ryan Gosling
Presented tribute to all the stunt performers in cinema history
Mahershala Ali
Ke Huy Quan
Tim Robbins
Sam Rockwell
Christoph Waltz
Presented the award for Best Supporting Actor
Danny DeVito
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Presented the awards for Best Visual Effects and Best Film Editing
America Ferrera
Kate McKinnon
Presented the awards for Best Documentary Short Film and Best Documentary Feature Film
Zendaya Presented the award for Best Cinematography
Issa Rae
Ramy Youssef
Presented the award for Best Live Action Short Film
John Mulaney Presented the award for Best Sound
Cynthia Erivo
Ariana Grande
Presented the awards for Best Original Score and Best Original Song
Nicolas Cage
Brendan Fraser
Ben Kingsley
Matthew McConaughey
Forest Whitaker
Presented the award for Best Actor
Steven Spielberg Presented the award for Best Director
Sally Field
Jessica Lange
Jennifer Lawrence
Charlize Theron
Michelle Yeoh
Presented the award for Best Actress
Al Pacino Presented the award for Best Picture
Performers
Name(s) Role Work
Rickey Minor Music director Directed the orchestra
Billie Eilish
Finneas O'Connell
Performers "What Was I Made For?" from Barbie
Scott George
Osage singers and dancers
"Wahzhazhe (A Song for My People)" from Killers of the Flower Moon
Jon Batiste Performer "It Never Went Away" from American Symphony
Becky G "The Fire Inside [de]" from Flamin' Hot
Ryan Gosling
Mark Ronson
Simu Liu
Scott Evans
Ncuti Gatwa
Kingsley Ben-Adir
Slash
Wolfgang Van Halen
Performers "I'm Just Ken" from Barbie
Andrea Bocelli
Matteo Bocelli
"Time to Say Goodbye" during the annual "In Memoriam" tribute

Ceremony information[edit]

Photo of Jimmy Kimmel in June 2022.
Jimmy Kimmel hosted the 96th Academy Awards, his fourth overall.

On October 17, 2023, Hamish Hamilton was announced as director.[56] On November 15, Jimmy Kimmel was announced as host, returning for the second consecutive year and fourth Academy Awards overall.[7] On November 30, 2023, ABC and the Academy announced that the start time of the ceremony would be moved up by an hour to 4:00 p.m. PT (7:00 p.m. ET).[57] This change enabled ABC to air a half-hour of primetime programming as a lead-out, featuring a new episode of its sitcom Abbott Elementary.[57] An American Sign Language livestream was broadcast on the Academy's YouTube page featuring video of interpreters.[58]

The pre-show was hosted for the third consecutive year by Vanessa Hudgens, joined by new co-host Julianne Hough.[59] Due to the scheduling change, the pre-show was shortened to 30 minutes.[57] The beginning of the ceremony was delayed by six minutes, due to arrivals being slowed by Israel–Hamas war protests outside of the theatre.[60][61][62]

On January 29, 2024, comedian and broadcaster Amelia Dimoldenberg, host of the YouTube interview series Chicken Shop Date, was announced as the social media ambassador and red carpet correspondent. Dimoldenberg was involved in multiple Oscar season events, including the Oscars Nominees luncheon, where she participated in an Academy video production with nominees. She was also involved interviewing people at the Oscars red carpet and the "Oscars 96 Behind the Scenes Tour".[63]

Presenters were announced in a series of groups beginning on February 26, 2024.[64][65][66] Performers were announced on February 28, 2024.[67][68] After the first batch of presenters was announced, The Hollywood Reporter learned that the Academy would revive a popular presenting format previously used in 2009,[69] where five Oscar-winning actors for leading and supporting performances took the stage together to introduce the current nominees in their respective categories.[70] David Alan Grier was selected as the event's announcer.[71]

Production designers Alana Billingsley and Misty Buckley designed the stage over the course of nine months. According to Billingsley and Buckley, they were inspired by contemporary spaces where people can "meet, exchange, create [like] a modern-day plaza".[72] Throughout the ceremony, the stage subtly changed its design to honor the nominees; the screenplay categories included images of real typewriters, while the Best Costume Design category showcased images of several of the nominated costumes.[72]

Messi the Dog from Anatomy of a Fall attended the ceremony and had his own seat in the audience. According to The Hollywood Reporter, multiple companies with nominated films had complained to the Academy about him attending the Oscar nominees luncheon and giving the film an advantage for voting.[73] Before the ceremony, the show's host, Jimmy Kimmel, shared a video in which he could be seen rehearsing his Oscars jokes with Messi. He also made a surprise appearance in the audience of the show and appeared to urinate on Matt Damon's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame as part of the ongoing Damon–Kimmel feud.[74]

Nominees Kaouther Ben Hania, Finneas O'Connell, Billie Eilish, and Mark Ruffalo, as well as presenters Ramy Youssef and Mahershala Ali, wore red Artists4Ceasefire badges calling for a ceasefire in Gaza.[75][76][77][78]

Diversity rules[edit]

This was the first year that diversity rules for the Best Picture category became mandatory. In June 2020, under its Academy Aperture 2025 initiative, the academy established a set of "representation and inclusion standards" that a film would be required to satisfy in order to compete in the category.[79] For the last two years, filmmakers were just required to submit a confidential "Academy Inclusion Standards" form for data purposes only.[80] There are four general standards, of which a film must satisfy two to be considered for Best Picture: (a) "on-screen representation, themes, and narratives"; (b) "creative leadership and project team"; (c) "industry access and opportunities"; and (d) "audience development".[79]

As explained by Alissa Wilkinson of Vox in 2020, the standards "basically break down into two big buckets: standards promoting more inclusive representation and standards promoting more inclusive employment".[80] The standards are intended to provide greater opportunities for employment for underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, women, LGBTQ+ people, and persons with cognitive or physical disabilities.[79]

Box office performance of Best Picture nominees[edit]

When the nominations were announced, the films nominated for Best Picture had earned a combined gross of $1.09 billion at the American and Canadian box offices at the time.[81] Barbie was the highest-grossing film among the Best Picture nominees, with $636 million in domestic box office receipts. Oppenheimer came in second with $327 million. The two films, comprising the "Barbenheimer" phenomenon, represented 88% of the cumulative box office haul generated by Best Picture nominees prior to their nominations.[82] Oppenheimer became the highest-grossing Best Picture winner since The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King at the 76th Academy Awards in 2004. It also became the first one to gross more than $100 million at the domestic box office in the decade since Argo at the 85th Academy Awards in 2013.[83]

Reception[edit]

The ceremony received mostly positive reviews from critics.[84] On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, 83% of 23 critics' reviews are positive. The website's consensus reads: "Moving at a surprisingly swift clip and peppered with a slate of predictable but agreeable victors, the 96th Oscars' infectious Ken-ergy yields one of the best ceremonies in recent memory."[85] Highlights in reviews included the musical performances of "I'm Just Ken" and "Wahzhazhe (A Song for My People)", John Mulaney summarizing the plot of Field of Dreams (1989) while presenting the award for Best Sound, an almost nude John Cena presenting Best Costume Design (which Kimmel billed as marking the 50th anniversary of a streaking incident at the 1974 ceremony),[86][87] and past acting winners introducing this year's nominees.[88][89][90]

The Zone of Interest director Jonathan Glazer received substantial praise and criticism for his Best International Feature acceptance speech, during which he called for the end of Israel's bombardment of Gaza.[91] One sentence from Glazer's speech, in which he said that he and fellow producer James Wilson "stand here as men who refute their Jewishness and the Holocaust being hijacked by an occupation which has led to conflict for so many innocent people", was widely misinterpreted and misquoted, with some sources ending the quote after the words "refute their Jewishness" and incorrectly suggesting that Glazer was disavowing his Jewish identity.[92][93][94] Many pro-Israel figures disapproved of the statement,[95][96] and in the days following the ceremony, over 1,000 Jewish members of the film industry signed an open letter denouncing Glazer's speech and defending the actions of the Israeli government.[97][98] Others defended Glazer's comments, including Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Tony Kushner[99] and the director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, where The Zone of Interest is set and where parts of it were filmed.[100] In April 2024, 151 Jewish members of the film industry (including Joaquin Phoenix, Wallace Shawn, Miriam Margolyes, and Joel Coen) signed an open letter in support of Glazer's speech.[101]

Conversely, the "In Memoriam" section received criticism for being too distracting and the names and faces being so tiny and distant much of the time that it was difficult recognizing them.[102][103][104] The Best Picture presentation by Al Pacino was criticized for not naming the 10 nominees before announcing the winner.[105][106][107] Clips from the Best Picture nominees had been shown over the course of the ceremony, and producer Molly McNearney said to Variety that the reading of the nominees was cut "because we were very worried that the show was going to be long". Similarly, the nominees for Best Original Song were also not read aloud when handed out by Cynthia Erivo and Ariana Grande, as each of the songs had been performed earlier in the evening.[108] Acknowledging that it was not his decision, Pacino later apologized for not listing the nominees, saying that "to not be fully recognized is offensive and hurtful".[109]

Ratings[edit]

The American telecast on ABC drew in an average of 19.5 million people over its length, which was a 4% increase from the previous year's ceremony and marking the longest streak of annual ratings increases for the Academy Awards since 2014.[110] However, the show slipped a little among adults ages 18–49 with a 3.81 rating among viewers in that key demographic, down 5% from 4.03 rating of the previous year's ceremony.[111] The viewership peaked in the last half-hour with 21.9 million total viewers.[112] The ceremony scored the biggest audience for any awards show since the 92nd Academy Awards in 2020, and is so far the largest viewership for any live non-sports entertainment program on U.S. television in the post-COVID-19 pandemic era.[12] ABC's Abbott Elementary lead-out also benefitted, with the episode reaching a series high in the 18–49 demo (1.42 rating) and total viewership (6.9 million).[57][113]

"In Memoriam"[edit]

The following people who had died received tributes (in order of appearance) in the "In Memoriam" segment. Tenor Andrea Bocelli performed his song "Time to Say Goodbye" with his son Matteo during the tribute.[114]

At the end of the segment, a collage of additional names appeared on the theater's main screen: Kenneth Anger, Norma Barzman, Léa Garcia, Jenne Casarotto, Jamie Christopher, Terence Davies, Carl Davis, Arlene Donovan [de], Peter Werner, Daniel Goldberg, Elisha Birnbaum, Ross McDonnell, Nancy Green-Keyes, Shecky Greene, Matthew A. Sweeney, Gary O. Martin, William F. Matthews, John Hamlin, Mo Henry, Barry Humphries, Ron Cephas Jones, Robert Klane, Daniel Langlois, Norman Lear, Michael Lerner, Lance Reddick, Jess Search, Tom Smothers, Suzanne Somers, David McCallum, Cormac McCarthy, Ernst F. Goldschmidt [de], Norman Steinberg, Frances Sternhagen, Ray Stevenson, Don Murray, Sinéad O'Connor, Conrad Palmisano, Cilia van Dijk, Steven Weisberg, Frederic Forrest, George Maharis, Paolo Taviani, Kevin Turen, Paxton Whitehead, Treat Williams, Ian Wingrove and Burt Young.[114][115]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Kimmel previously hosted the 89th ceremony in 2017, the 90th ceremony in 2018, and the 95th ceremony in 2023.[7]
  2. ^ This tenth nomination only includes Scorsese's accolades within the Best Director category; he has additional nominations for writing and producing. Scorsese now has the second most, surpassing Steven Spielberg, who has 9 for directing (and 2 wins).[20] William Wyler maintains the record with 12 nominations (and 3 wins).[21]
  3. ^ Attributed to multiple references:[41][42][43] (excluding Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) which was an American co-production)
  4. ^ Initially scheduled for November 18, 2023, the ceremony was postponed due to the 2023 Hollywood labor disputes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coates, Tyler (March 6, 2024). "Vanessa Hudgens and Julianne Hough to Host Oscars Red Carpet Pre-Show". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 6, 2024. Retrieved March 29, 2024.
  2. ^ Hammond, Pete (March 6, 2024). "Oscar Producers Talk Early Start Time, 20 Previous Winners Presenting Acting Prizes & That Massive 'I'm Just Ken' Number with 65 Male Dancers Backing Ryan Gosling: "We're Going Big!"". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 29, 2024. Retrieved March 29, 2024.
  3. ^ Molnar, James A. "Oscars 2024: 96th Academy Awards winners". The Gold Knight. Archived from the original on March 29, 2024. Retrieved March 29, 2024.
  4. ^ Campione, Katie; Patten, Dominic (March 11, 2024). "Oscar Viewership Rises 4% as Oppenheimer-Dominated Ceremony Starts an Hour Earlier". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  5. ^ Pucci, Douglas (March 12, 2024). "Sunday Ratings: Abbott Elementary on ABC Reaches Series-High in Post-Oscars Slot, Academy Awards Hit 4-Year High". Programming Insider. Archived from the original on March 31, 2024. Retrieved March 13, 2024.
  6. ^ a b c Davis, Clayton (April 25, 2023). "Oscars 2024: Academy Sets Nominations and Ceremony Dates". Variety. Archived from the original on April 24, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  7. ^ a b Rose, Lacey (November 15, 2023). "Oscars: Jimmy Kimmel Back as 2024 Host". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 15, 2023. Retrieved November 15, 2023.
  8. ^ FitzPatrick, Hayley; Blackwelder, Carson; Jane Bernabe, Angeline (January 23, 2024). "Oscar Nominations 2024: Full list of nominees". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  9. ^ a b "The 95th Academy Awards (2024) | Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  10. ^ a b Fleming, Mike Jr.; Hipes, Patrick (January 23, 2024). "Oscar Nominations: Diversified Voting Throws the Love Around as Oppenheimer Tops with 13, with Poor Things, Killers of the Flower Moon and Barbie Close Behind – Full List". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  11. ^ "Oscars 2024: the full list of winners". The Guardian. March 10, 2024. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  12. ^ a b Porter, Rick (March 11, 2024). "TV Ratings: Oscars Score Post-Pandemic Highs". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  13. ^ a b Davis, Clayton (January 10, 2024). "John Mulaney Surprises Governors Awards as Host, Recalls Failed Audition for Maggie Gyllenhaal Movie as 'Young Cop'". Variety. Archived from the original on January 10, 2024. Retrieved January 11, 2024.
  14. ^ Giardina, Carolyn (February 23, 2024). "SciTech Awards: Academy Celebrates Theatrical Exhibition Advancements". Variety. Archived from the original on February 28, 2024. Retrieved March 6, 2024.
  15. ^ Hipes, Patrick (January 18, 2024). "Watch the 2024 Oscar Nominations Livestream". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 21, 2024. Retrieved January 22, 2024.
  16. ^ "Oscar Nominations 2024 List: Nominees by Category". ABC. January 23, 2024. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  17. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (January 23, 2024). "Barbenheimer Ongoing Brawl Extends Beyond Box Office to Oscar Nominations". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  18. ^ King, Andrew (January 25, 2024). "With the Oscar Nominations in, There's No Chance Oppenheimer Loses Best Picture". TheGamer. Archived from the original on January 27, 2024. Retrieved January 26, 2024.
  19. ^ "Steven Spielberg Receives Record 13th Oscar Nomination for Best Picture". A.frame. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. January 23, 2024. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  20. ^ a b Hibberd, James (January 23, 2024). "Martin Scorsese Nominated for Record 10th Director Oscar, Passing Steven Spielberg". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  21. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (January 23, 2024). "John Williams & Martin Scorsese Make Oscar History as Oldest Nominees, Set Records for Most Noms". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  22. ^ Desowitz, Bill (January 23, 2024). "2024 Oscars: Oppenheimer Dominates the Craft Nominations with 7". IndieWire. Archived from the original on January 24, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  23. ^ a b White, Abbey; Perez, Lexy (January 26, 2024). "Oscars: America Ferrera, Colman Domingo, Lily Gladstone, and John Williams Among 2024 Nominee Milestones". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 28, 2024. Retrieved January 28, 2024.
  24. ^ Hammond, Pete (January 23, 2024). "Bradley Cooper Reacts to Seven Oscar Nominations for Maestro, Including Three of His Own: 'It's Very Surreal'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  25. ^ "Oppenheimer Audio Team Joins 'Mix Presents Sound for Film: Awards Season'". Mix. December 8, 2023. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  26. ^ "Oppenheimer Sound Mixer Willie Burton Records the Sonic Thunder of Nolan's Biopic". Zaxcom. Archived from the original on January 29, 2024. Retrieved January 28, 2024.
  27. ^ Thomas, Carly (January 23, 2024). "Cillian Murphy, Colman Domingo, Emily Blunt Among First-Time Oscar Nominees in Acting Categories". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 24, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  28. ^ Davis, Clayton (January 23, 2024). "Oscars Diversity 2024: People of Color in Every Acting Category, Jodie Foster and Colman Domingo Make History and More". Variety. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  29. ^ "Pride Guide: 15 LGBTQ+ Filmmakers and Artists on the Rise in 2023". A.frame. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. June 16, 2023. Archived from the original on February 26, 2024. Retrieved February 26, 2024.
  30. ^ Andersson, Eric (December 31, 2023). "Lily Gladstone on Why She Uses She/They Pronouns: A Way of 'Decolonizing Gender for Myself' (Exclusive)". People. Archived from the original on January 30, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024. 'So, yeah, my pronoun use is partly a way of decolonizing gender for myself.'
  31. ^ Blyth, Antonia (January 23, 2024). "Killers of the Flower Moon's Lily Gladstone Makes History as First Native Actress of American Descent to Be Oscar Nominated". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 23, 2024.
  32. ^ McDonnell, Brandy (January 26, 2024). "Oklahoma Osage composer makes history with Killers of the Flower Moon Oscar nomination". The Oklahoman. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved February 5, 2024.
  33. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (January 23, 2024). "Female Filmmakers Set Oscar Nomination Record in Best Picture Category". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 23, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  34. ^ Davis, Clayton (January 23, 2024). "Women Directors Have Three Best Picture Nominees, Setting Oscar Record". Variety. Archived from the original on January 27, 2024. Retrieved January 27, 2024.
  35. ^ Rapold, Nicolas (October 13, 2023). "A marital murder mystery written by a real-life couple? They didn't kill each other". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 28, 2024. Retrieved January 28, 2024.
  36. ^ O'Kane, Caitlin (January 23, 2024). "Oscar nominations 2024: Justine Triet becomes 8th woman ever nominated for Best Director". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 24, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  37. ^ Russell, Shania (January 23, 2024). "Couple goals! Meet the 6 power couples vying for gold at the 2024 Oscars". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 24, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  38. ^ Grein, Paul (March 10, 2024). "Billie Eilish & Finneas, Ludwig Göransson and More Record-Setters at 2024 Oscars". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  39. ^ Brueggemann, Tom (March 11, 2024). "Killers of the Flower Moon is Martin Scorsese's Third Film to Go 0-10 at the Oscars". IndieWire. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  40. ^ Dolak, Kevin; Szalai, Georg (March 11, 2024). "The Zone of Interest Director Makes Gaza Statement in Oscars Speech". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  41. ^ White, Cindy (February 21, 2024). "Why Godzilla Minus One could, and should, win an Oscar". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on February 21, 2024. Retrieved February 21, 2024.
  42. ^ "How the Godzilla Minus One VFX Team Took the Titan to Terrifying New Heights (Exclusive)". A.frame. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. February 13, 2024. Archived from the original on February 13, 2024. Retrieved February 13, 2024.
  43. ^ Grebey, James (February 7, 2024). "How Godzilla Minus One Pulled Off Oscar-Nominated VFX for Less Than $15 Million". Vulture. Archived from the original on February 7, 2024. Retrieved February 7, 2024.
  44. ^ Goodfellow, Melanie (March 11, 2024). "Record Number of Non-English Language Movies Take Home Oscar Statuettes". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  45. ^ McGovern, Joe (March 11, 2024). "Godzilla Minus One Record: 1st Director to Win VFX Oscar Since Kubrick". TheWrap. Archived from the original on March 19, 2024. Retrieved March 19, 2024.
  46. ^ Giardina, Carolyn (March 11, 2024). "'The Boy and the Heron' Delivers Hayao Miyazaki His Second Oscar". Variety. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  47. ^ Amidi, Amid (March 11, 2024). "Boy and the Heron is the First Hand-Drawn Animated Feature to Win Oscar in 21 Years". Cartoon Brew. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  48. ^ "The 96th Academy Awards (2024) | Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  49. ^ Saperstein, Pat (September 6, 2023). "Governors Awards Move to January Amid Strikes". Variety. Archived from the original on September 7, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  50. ^ Hammond, Pete (January 10, 2024). "First Oscars of the Season Handed Out at 14th Governors Awards: Mel Brooks, Angela Bassett, Carol Littleton, Michelle Satter". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on January 11, 2024. Retrieved January 11, 2024.
  51. ^ a b c d "The Academy to Honor Angela Bassett, Mel Brooks, and Carol Littleton with Academy Honorary Awards and Michelle Satter with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award" (Press release). Oscars.org. June 26, 2023. Archived from the original on December 26, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  52. ^ Lang, Brent; Moreau, Jordan (January 23, 2024). "Oscar Nominations 2024: Oppenheimer Dominates with 13 Nods, Poor Things Follows with 11". Variety. Archived from the original on January 24, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  53. ^ Pedersen, Erik; Hipes, Patrick (March 11, 2024). "Oscar Scorecards: Wins by Film & Distributor". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  54. ^ Lang, Brent; Moreau, Jordan (March 10, 2024). "Oppenheimer Reigns at Oscars with Seven Wins, including Best Picture and Director: Full Winners List". Variety. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  55. ^ Patrick, Hayley Fitz; Blackwelder, Carson; Bernabe, Angeline Jane; Najib, Shafiq; Leib, Mason (March 10, 2024). "Oscars 2024 recap: Biggest moments from the 96th Academy Awards". ABC News. Archived from the original on March 10, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  56. ^ Hammond, Pete (October 17, 2023). "Raj Kapoor & Katy Mullan Named Executive Producers for 96th Oscar Show; Hamish Hamilton Set as Director". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 24, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  57. ^ a b c d Hammond, Pete; Hipes, Patrick (November 30, 2023). "Oscars 2024 Ceremony Moves Up Start Time by an Hour; Abbott Elementary to Follow Telecast on ABC". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 30, 2023. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  58. ^ Hipes, Patrick (March 10, 2024). "How to Watch This Year's Oscars Online and On TV: Don't Forget About That Early Start". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 10, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  59. ^ Coates, Tyler (March 6, 2024). "Vanessa Hudgens and Julianne Hough to Host Oscars Red Carpet Pre-Show". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 6, 2024. Retrieved March 6, 2024.
  60. ^ Lee, Ashley (March 10, 2024). "2024 Oscars A-lister red carpet arrivals, ceremony delayed by Israel-Hamas protests". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  61. ^ Fleming, Mike Jr. (March 10, 2024). "Security Snafus Complicate Oscar Arrivals". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  62. ^ Amatulli, Jenna (March 11, 2024). "Oscars kicks off behind schedule as pro-Palestine protesters delay stars' arrivals". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  63. ^ Tangcay, Jazz; Thompson, Jaden; Brew, Caroline (January 29, 2024). "Amelia Dimoldenberg of Chicken Shop Date to Serve as Oscars Social Media Ambassador and Red Carpet Correspondent – Film News in Brief". Variety. Archived from the original on February 5, 2024. Retrieved January 30, 2024.
  64. ^ Pedersen, Erik (February 26, 2024). "Oscars: Zendaya, Brendan Fraser, Michelle Yeoh, Nicolas Cage, Lupita Nyong'o & Al Pacino Among First Group of Presenters". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on February 26, 2024. Retrieved February 27, 2024.
  65. ^ Verhoeven, Beatrice (February 29, 2024). "Dwayne Johnson, Bad Bunny and Jennifer Lawrence Among Additional 2024 Oscar Presenters". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on February 29, 2024. Retrieved February 29, 2024.
  66. ^ Verhoeven, Beatrice (March 5, 2024). "Ryan Gosling, Ariana Grande, America Ferrera Round Out 2024 Oscars Presenters". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 5, 2024. Retrieved March 5, 2024.
  67. ^ Pedersen, Erik (February 28, 2024). "Oscar Best Song Performers Set: Ryan Gosling, Billie Eilish, Jon Batiste, Becky G & More". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on February 28, 2024. Retrieved February 28, 2024.
  68. ^ Malkin, Marc (February 26, 2024). "Ryan Gosling Will Perform 'I'm Just Ken' at the Oscars". Variety. Archived from the original on March 4, 2024. Retrieved February 29, 2024.
  69. ^ Fallon, Kevin (March 7, 2023). "Bring Back the Oscars Acting Tributes That Made Me Cry, Dammit!". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on March 2, 2024. Retrieved March 2, 2024.
  70. ^ Feinberg, Scott (February 27, 2024). "Oscars: Five Past Winners Will Introduce Current Nominees in All Four Acting Categories (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 6, 2024. Retrieved February 27, 2024.
  71. ^ Fabian, Lester Brathwaite. "David Alan Grier is the 'Voice of God' at the Oscars". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  72. ^ a b Warner, Kara (March 6, 2024). "An Exclusive Early Look at the 2024 Oscars Set". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on March 6, 2024. Retrieved March 6, 2024.
  73. ^ O'Connell, Mikey (March 8, 2024). "Messi the Dog, Anatomy of a Fall Star and New Hollywood Darling, Expected to Miss Oscars". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 15, 2024. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
  74. ^ Ewe, Koh (March 11, 2024). "Oscars: Anatomy of a Fall Dog Messi Steals Show During Awards Season". Time. Archived from the original on March 14, 2024. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
  75. ^ Olsen, Mark (March 10, 2024). "Those red buttons people are wearing on red carpets are a call for a cease-fire in Gaza". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 10, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  76. ^ Tashjian, Rachel; Lau, Joyce (March 11, 2024). "Red pins on the red carpet: Celebrities call for cease-fire at the Oscars". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  77. ^ Holmes, Linda. "Oscars 2024: A night of Oppenheimer, quiet protest, and Ryan Gosling just being Ken". NPR. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  78. ^ Thompson, Jaden; Donnelly, Matt; Moreau, Jordan (March 10, 2024). "Protesters Turn Oscars Red Carpet into Gridlock as Show Threatens to Start with Many Empty Seats". Variety. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  79. ^ a b c "Representation and Inclusion Standards". Oscars.org. Archived from the original on February 15, 2023. Retrieved February 15, 2023.
  80. ^ a b Wilkinson, Alissa (September 9, 2020). "The Oscars' new rules for Best Picture nominees, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on February 15, 2023. Retrieved February 15, 2023.
  81. ^ Whitten, Sarah (January 23, 2024). "Best-Picture Oscar nominees Barbenheimer account for 88% of the slate's box-office haul". CNBC. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  82. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (January 23, 2024). "American Fiction, Poor Things & Zone of Interest to Reap Oscar Halo Effect at Box Office; Best Pics at $2.7B WW, Down from 2023". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 3, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  83. ^ McClintock, Pamela (March 11, 2024). "Oscars: Oppenheimer Lifts 20-Year Curse on Blockbusters Winning Best Picture". Yahoo! Finance. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  84. ^ Patten, Dominic (March 11, 2024). "Oscars TV Review: Jimmy Kimmel Packs a Punch on Trump & More as ABC & Producers Finally Make an Academy Awards for the 21st Century". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  85. ^ "The Academy Awards: 96th Oscars". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Archived from the original on March 15, 2024. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
  86. ^ Lenker, Maureen Lee. "Naked John Cena pays tribute to 50th anniversary of Oscars streaker". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  87. ^ Nelson, Dustin; Stenzel, Wesley. "All the naked details on John Cena's revealing Oscars moment: 'You can't show crack'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  88. ^ Lowry, Brian (March 11, 2024). "Oscar highlights: Oppenheimer wins big, while Ryan Gosling and past winner cameos stole the show". CNN. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  89. ^ Fienberg, Daniel (March 11, 2024). "Critic's Notebook: Busy and Eclectic Oscars 2024 Telecast Delivers Many Highlights (and a Few Lowlights)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  90. ^ Fabian, Lester Brathwaite. "The best and worst moments from the 2024 Oscars". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  91. ^ Pulver, Andrew; Shoard, Catherine (March 11, 2024). "'We stand here as Jewish men who refute the Holocaust being hijacked': Jonathan Glazer calls for end to Gaza attacks at Oscars". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  92. ^ Romano, Aja (March 11, 2024). "No, the director of Zone of Interest did not disavow his Jewish identity at the Oscars". Vox. Archived from the original on March 23, 2024. Retrieved March 22, 2024.
  93. ^ Rahman, Abid (March 11, 2024). "Jonathan Glazer's Oscar Speech Becomes Latest Battleground in Israel-Gaza Conflict". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  94. ^ Siegel, Tatiana; Ritman, Alex (March 13, 2024). "Controversy Grows After Zone of Interest Director Jonathan Glazer Uses Oscar Speech to Condemn the Israel-Hamas War". Variety. Archived from the original on March 14, 2024. Retrieved March 15, 2024.
  95. ^ "Israel 'Disgusted' After Zone of Interest Director Jonathan Glazer's Gaza Statement at the Oscars". Times Now. March 11, 2024. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  96. ^ Brown, Hannah (March 11, 2024). "Oscar-winning Jewish director of Holocaust film denounces 'occupation,' 'dehumanization'". The Jerusalem Post. Archived from the original on March 10, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  97. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (March 18, 2024). "Over 1,000 Jewish Creatives and Professionals Have Now Denounced Jonathan Glazer's Zone of Interest Oscars Speech in Open Letter". Variety. Archived from the original on March 18, 2024. Retrieved March 21, 2024.
  98. ^ Piña, Christy (March 19, 2024). "Jonathan Glazer Open Letter Gets More Than 500 Additional Signatures Overnight". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 19, 2024. Retrieved March 19, 2024.
  99. ^ Shoard, Catherine (March 21, 2024). "'Unimpeachable, irrefutable': US playwright Tony Kushner praises Jonathan Glazer's Oscars speech". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 21, 2024. Retrieved March 21, 2024.
  100. ^ Anguiano, Dani (March 20, 2024). "'Honest and brave': progressive Jewish figures defend Jonathan Glazer speech". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 21, 2024. Retrieved March 21, 2024.
  101. ^ Gardner, Chris (April 5, 2024). "Jonathan Glazer's Controversial Oscars Speech Backed by Group of Jewish Creatives". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 5, 2024. Retrieved April 6, 2024.
  102. ^ Lawler, Kelly. "The 2024 Oscars were worse than bad. They were boring". USA Today. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  103. ^ Richmond, Ray (March 11, 2024). "2024 Oscars Review: In uneven but often lively ceremony, all roads lead to Ken". GoldDerby. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  104. ^ Furnell, Hannah (March 10, 2024). "Furious Oscars viewers slam In Memoriam segment for being 'unwatchable'". Express. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  105. ^ Piña, Christy (March 11, 2024). "Al Pacino Skips Announcing Nominees While Presenting Best Picture". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  106. ^ Minelle, Bethany. "Oscars 2024: Oppenheimer takes best film as Al Pacino makes slip-up". Sky News. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  107. ^ Keegan, Rebecca (March 11, 2024). "Al Pacino Says Awkward Best Picture Delivery Was "a Choice by Producers"". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  108. ^ Cain, Sian (March 12, 2024). "Oscars 2024: Al Pacino says he was told not to name Best Picture nominee". The Guardian. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  109. ^ Sharf, Zack (March 11, 2024). "Al Pacino Addresses Oscars 'Controversy' Over Not Naming Best Picture Nominees: It Was 'a Choice by Producers' and 'I Empathize with Those Slighted by This Oversight'". Variety. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 21, 2024.
  110. ^ Grynbaum, Michael M. (March 12, 2024). "Barbenheimer, and an Early Start, Boost Oscar Ratings to 4-Year High". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  111. ^ Otterson, Joe (March 11, 2024). "2024 Oscar Ratings: Academy Awards Audience Rises Slightly to 19.5 Million Viewers". Variety. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  112. ^ "Ratings – Earlier Start Time Propels "The Oscars" on ABC to Hit 4-Year High in Viewers". The Futon Critic. Archived from the original on March 31, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  113. ^ "'The Oscars' on ABC Hits 4-Year High in Viewers". The Walt Disney Company. March 11, 2024. Archived from the original on March 12, 2024. Retrieved March 12, 2024.
  114. ^ a b Travis, Emlyn (March 10, 2024). "Who did the Oscars 2024 In Memoriam include? Full list of those remembered at the Academy Awards". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 11, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.
  115. ^ "In Memoriam". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on March 10, 2024. Retrieved March 11, 2024.

External links[edit]

Other resources