Grammy Award for Best Music Video

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

Grammy Award for Best Music Video
Awarded forQuality short form music videos
CountryUnited States
Presented byNational Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1984
Currently held by"Freedom" (2022)
Websitegrammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Music Video is an honor presented at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards,[1] to performers, directors, and producers of quality short form music videos. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".[2]

Originally called the Grammy Award for Best Video, Short Form, the award was first presented in 1984, as was a similar award for Best Long Form Music Video. From 1986 to 1997, the category name was changed to Best Music Video, Short Form. However, in 1988 and 1989, the award criteria were changed and the video awards were presented under the categories Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video. The awards were returned to the original format in 1990. The category was called Best Short Form Music Video until 2012, from 2013 it was shortened to Best Music Video.[3] Award recipients include the performers, directors, and producers associated with the winning videos, except for its first two years when the Grammy went to the performing artist only. For unknown reasons, the award for the Best Music Video in 1987 - Brothers in Arms by Dire Straits - went to the band only, not to the director(s) and/or producer(s).

Peter Gabriel, Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson, Johnny Cash, Kendrick Lamar, and Beyoncé hold the record for the most wins as a performer in this category, with two each. Mark Romanek holds the record for the most wins as a director, with a total of three. Icelandic singer Björk holds the record for the most nominations as a performer without a win, with four.

Recipients[edit]

David Bowie received the award for "Jazzin' for Blue Jean".
English band Dire Straits received the award for "Brothers in Arms".
A man wearing dark sunglasses and a jacket covered in blue and yellow rhinestones, holding up his right hand which is covered in a white glove. Behind him stands a man in a black suit.
Michael Jackson has won the award twice for "Leave Me Alone" and "Scream"[4].
A woman sitting at a table with her arms crossed; she is wearing red lipstick and a colorful dress with sequins.
1991 award winner for "Opposites Attract", Paula Abdul.
Tarsem won the award for R.E.M.'s "Losing My Religion".
Two-time winner Peter Gabriel.
1995 and 2014 winner, director David Fincher.
Two-time winner Janet Jackson.
A woman in black clothing holding a guitar and standing behind a microphone stand with one arm extended straight into the air. In the background is a screen with shades of pink and purple.
1999 award winner, Madonna, performing "Ray of Light" on the "Confessions Tour".
A man in a pink dress shirt and tan jacket holding up a producer credit for "The 1 Second Film" (as indicated by the text).
2002 award winner for directing the music video for "Weapon of Choice", Spike Jonze.
Two-time winner, director Joseph Kahn.
Director Mark Romanek holds the record of most wins for a director with three.
Missy Elliot won for "Lose Control", her collaboration with Ciara and Fatman Scoop.
Four men wearing dress shirts and ties of various colors with their hands extended in uniform positions. All four men are looking straight ahead, and stand before trees and a blue tarp.
Members of the band OK Go, among winners of the 2007 award for "Here It Goes Again", performing in 2006.
A woman with blond hair and a microphone up to her mouth
2011 award winner for "Bad Romance", Lady Gaga.
A woman wearing a black turtle neck with a microphone in front of her face
2012 award winner for "Rolling in the Deep", Adele.
A women with a red dress singing into a gold microphone
2013 award winner for "We Found Love", Rihanna.
2014 award winner for "Suit & Tie", Justin Timberlake.
Beyoncé has won the award twice for "Formation" and "Brown Skin Girl".
2018 winner Kendrick Lamar for "Humble".
Year[I] Work(s) Performing artist(s) Director(s) and Producer(s)[II] Nominees Ref.
1984 "Girls on Film"/"Hungry Like the Wolf" Duran Duran N/A
[5]
1985 "Jazzin' for Blue Jean" David Bowie N/A
[6]
1986 "We Are the World – The Video Event" USA for Africa
[7]
1987 "Brothers in Arms" Dire Straits N/A
[8]
1988 N/A[III] N/A N/A N/A [9]
1989 N/A[III] N/A N/A N/A [10]
1990 "Leave Me Alone" Michael Jackson
[11]
1991 "Opposites Attract" Paula Abdul
[12]
1992 "Losing My Religion" R.E.M.
  • Tarsem, director
  • Dave Ramser, producer
[13]
1993 "Digging in the Dirt" Peter Gabriel
  • John Downer, director/producer
[14]
1994 "Steam" Peter Gabriel
[15]
1995 "Love Is Strong" The Rolling Stones
[16]
1996 "Scream" Michael Jackson & Janet Jackson
[17]
1997 "Free as a Bird" The Beatles
[18]
1998 "Got 'til It's Gone" Janet Jackson
[19]
1999 "Ray of Light" Madonna
[20]
2000 "Freak on a Leash" Korn
[21]
2001 "Learn to Fly" Foo Fighters
[22]
2002 "Weapon of Choice" Fatboy Slim featuring Bootsy Collins
  • Spike Jonze, director
  • Vincent Landay & Deannie O'Neill, producers
[23]
2003 "Without Me" Eminem
[24]
2004 "Hurt" Johnny Cash
[25]
2005 "Vertigo" U2
[26]
2006 "Lose Control" Missy Elliott featuring Ciara & Fatman Scoop
[27]
2007 "Here It Goes Again" OK Go
[28]
2008 "God's Gonna Cut You Down" Johnny Cash
[29]
2009 "Pork and Beans" Weezer
[30]
2010 "Boom Boom Pow" The Black Eyed Peas
  • Mark Kudsi & Mathew Cullen, directors
  • Javier Jimenez, Anna Joseph & Patrick Nugent, producers
[31]
2011 "Bad Romance" Lady Gaga
  • Francis Lawrence, director
  • Kathy Angstadt, Nicole Ehrlich & Heather Heller, producers
[32]
2012 "Rolling in the Deep" Adele
  • Sam Brown, director
  • Hannah Chandler, producer
[33]
2013 "We Found Love" Rihanna
Calvin Harris
  • Melina Matsoukas, director
  • Juliette Larthe, Candice Ouaknine, Ben Sullivan & Inga Veronique, producers
[34]
2014 "Suit & Tie" Justin Timberlake featuring Jay Z
[35]
2015 "Happy" Pharrell Williams
  • We Are from LA (Pierre Dupaquier & Clement Durou), directors
  • Kathleen Heffernan, Solal Micenmacher, Jett Steiger & Cedric Troadec, producers
[36]
2016 "Bad Blood" Taylor Swift featuring Kendrick Lamar
[37]
2017 "Formation" Beyoncé
2018 "Humble" Kendrick Lamar
  • The Little Homies & Dave Meyers, directors
  • Jason Baum, Dave Free, Jamie Rabineau, Nathan K. Scherrer & Anthony Tiffith, producers
  • Beck – "Up All Night" (Nicolas Mendez & Lope Serrano, video directors; Alba Barneda, Laura Serra Estorch & Oscar Romagosa, video producers)
  • Jain – "Makeba" (Lionel Hirle & Gregory Ohrel, video directors; Yodelice, video producer)
  • Jay Z – "The Story of O.J." (Shawn Carter & Mark Romanek, video directors; Daniel Midgley, Elizabeth Newman & Chaka Pilgrim, video producers)
  • Logic featuring Alessia Cara & Khalid – "1-800-273-8255" (Andy Hines, video director; Brandon Bonfiglio, Mildred Delamota, Andrew Lerios, Luga Podesta & Alex Randall, video producers)
[38]
2019 "This Is America" Childish Gambino
  • Hiro Murai, director
  • Ibra Ake, Jason Cole & Fam Rothstein, producers
  • The Carters – "Apeshit" (Ricky Saiz, video director; Mélodie Buchris, Natan Schottenfels & Erinn Williams, video producers)
  • Joyner Lucas – "I'm Not Racist" (Joyner Lucas & Ben Proulx, video directors; Joyner Lucas, video producer)
  • Janelle Monáe – "Pynk" (Emma Westenberg, video director; Justin Benoliel & Whitney Jackson, video producers)
  • Tierra Whack – "Mumbo Jumbo" (Marco Prestini, video director; Sara Nassim, video producer)
[39]
2020 "Old Town Road" Lil Nas X featuring Billy Ray Cyrus
  • Calmatic, director
  • Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, producers
[40]
2021 "Brown Skin Girl" Beyoncé, Blue Ivy & Wizkid
  • Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Jenn Nkiru, directors
  • Lauren Baker, Astrid Edwards, Nathan Scherrer and Erinn Williams, producers
[41]
2022 "Freedom" Jon Batiste
[42]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
^[II] Director(s) are only indicated if they were presented with a Grammy Award.
^[III] Award was not presented. Music video categories presented this year included Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
  • "Past Winners Search". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved April 18, 2014.
  • "Best Music Video – Short & Long Form". Rock on the Net. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ "Grammy Awards at a Glance". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 9, 2012. Retrieved June 17, 2010.
  2. ^ "Overview". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2011.
  3. ^ "56th Annual GRAMMY Awards (2013)". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2018.
  4. ^ Co-winner with his sister Janet for "Scream".
  5. ^ "Complete List of the Nominees for 26th Annual Grammy Music Awards". Schenectady Gazette. Schenectady, New York. January 9, 1984. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
  6. ^ "27th Annual Grammy Awards Final Nominations". Billboard. Vol. 97, no. 4. January 26, 1985. p. 78. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  7. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 10, 1986). "'We Are The World' Scores In Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times. p. 6. Archived from the original on July 7, 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2010. Note: This source lists the directors associated with the nominated videos, but the "Nominees" column of the table contains the performing artists associated with the nominated videos.
  8. ^ Hunt, Dennis (January 9, 1987). "Grammy Nominations: Highs And Lows". Los Angeles Times. p. 5. Archived from the original on July 21, 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
  9. ^ "List of Grammy Award winners". Times-News. March 3, 1988. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved June 18, 2010. Note: This source verifies the existence of the categories Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video in 1988.
  10. ^ "McFerrin and Chapman Top Grammys". The New York Times. February 24, 1989. p. 2. Archived from the original on April 6, 2012. Retrieved May 6, 2011. Note: This source verifies the existence of the categories Best Concept Music Video and Best Performance Music Video in 1989.
  11. ^ "Grammy Award Nominations 2019". St. Petersburg Times. December 9, 2018. Archived from the original on December 9, 2018. Retrieved December 9, 2018.
  12. ^ Bargreen, Melinda (January 11, 1991). "Symphony Nominated For 4 Grammys". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on October 28, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  13. ^ "The Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times. January 9, 1992. p. 5. Archived from the original on June 18, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  14. ^ Macdonald, Patrick (January 8, 1993). "Grammys Show Influence Of Seattle Music". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on October 28, 2011. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
  15. ^ "36th Grammy Awards – 1994". Rock on the Net. Archived from the original on June 30, 2012. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  16. ^ "The 37th Grammy Nominations". Los Angeles Times. January 6, 1995. p. 16. Archived from the original on July 19, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  17. ^ "List of Grammy nominees". CNN. January 4, 1996. Archived from the original on December 7, 2012. Retrieved June 18, 2010.
  18. ^ Kot, Greg (January 8, 1997). "Pumpkins A Smash With 7 Grammy Nominations". Chicago Tribune. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 7, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  19. ^ "Complete List of Academy Voter Picks". Los Angeles Times. January 7, 1998. p. 15. Archived from the original on July 1, 2012. Retrieved May 6, 2011.
  20. ^ Kot, Greg (January 6, 1999). "10 Nominations Put Lauryn Hill Atop Grammy Heap". Chicago Tribune. p. 10. Archived from the original on July 1, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  21. ^ "Santana Tops List With 10 Grammy Nominations". The Seattle Times. January 5, 2000. Archived from the original on October 28, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  22. ^ "43rd Annual Grammy Awards". CNN. February 21, 2001. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 15, 2011.
  23. ^ "Complete List Of Grammy Nominees". CBS News. January 4, 2002. Archived from the original on October 10, 2003. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  24. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominees; ceremony set for Feb. 23". San Francisco Chronicle. January 8, 2003. p. 7. Archived from the original on March 22, 2012. Retrieved June 22, 2010.
  25. ^ "Nominee list for the 46th Annual Annual Grammy Awards". LiveDaily. December 4, 2003. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  26. ^ "Nominee list for the 47th Annual Annual Grammy Awards". LiveDaily. December 7, 2004. Archived from the original on January 7, 2010. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  27. ^ "The Complete List of Grammy Nominations". The New York Times Company. December 8, 2005. p. 8. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  28. ^ "49th Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on December 20, 2006. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  29. ^ "Grammy 2008 Winners List". MTV. February 10, 2008. Archived from the original on June 5, 2009. Retrieved June 24, 2010.
  30. ^ "The 51st Annual Grammy Awards Winners List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved June 22, 2010.
  31. ^ "The 52nd Annual Grammy Awards Nominees List". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on June 18, 2010. Retrieved June 22, 2010.
  32. ^ "53rd Annual Grammy Awards nominees list". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved December 2, 2010.
  33. ^ "The 54th Annual Grammy Awards Nominees List "Dance"". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on December 3, 2011. Retrieved December 7, 2010.
  34. ^ "List of Grammy Nominees 2013". Archived from the original on 2012-12-09. Retrieved 2012-12-06.
  35. ^ "The Official Site of Music's Biggest Night". GRAMMY.com. Archived from the original on February 1, 2012. Retrieved January 13, 2014.
  36. ^ "57th Grammy Nominees". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 13, 2015. Retrieved December 5, 2014.
  37. ^ "Grammy Nominations 2016: See the Full List of Nominees". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 7, 2015. Archived from the original on December 10, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  38. ^ "Grammy.com, 28 November 2017". Archived from the original on 28 November 2017. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  39. ^ "Grammy.com, 7 December 2018". Archived from the original on 7 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  40. ^ 62nd Grammy Awards nominations list
  41. ^ Kiefer, Halle (March 14, 2021). "Blue Ivy Is Officially a Grammy Winner". Vulture. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  42. ^ "2022 Grammy Nominations List". Grammy.com. Retrieved 23 November 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]