Leopold George Wickham Legg

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Leopold George Wickham Legg
Born(1877-03-22)22 March 1877
Died19 December 1962(1962-12-19) (aged 85)
Winchester, United Kingdom
NationalityBritish
EducationWinchester College and New College, Oxford
Occupation(s)Historian and editor
Spouse
Olive Maud Lindsay
(m. 1915⁠–⁠1962)
ChildrenThree daughters, one son
RelativesJohn Wickham Legg (father), Frank Willan (son-in-law)
Military career
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Naval Volunteer Reserve
RankLieutenant

Leopold George Wickham Legg (22 March 1877 – 19 December 1962) was an English academic historian specializing in diplomatic history.

An Oxford don from 1908 to 1948, for the Great War Legg was commissioned into the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. Apart from his own research work, he was editor of the Dictionary of National Biography.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in the parish of St George Hanover Square, Westminster, in 1877,[1] the son of John Wickham Legg (1843–1921), a physician and writer on ecclesiology, and his wife Eliza Jane, the young Legg was named after Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (1853–1884), for whom his father was personal physician. His parents were then living at 47, Green Street, Mayfair, and he was christened at All Saints, Margaret Street, on 31 March 1877 by William Legg, Rector of Hawkinge in Kent.[2]

Career[edit]

Legg was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, and was a Fellow of his college from 1908 to 1948.[3]

In 1914, shortly after the beginning of the First World War, Legg contributed to Why We Are at War: Great Britain's Case, a book giving a comprehensive account of the causes of the war, with chapters including "The neutrality of Belgium and Luxemburg", "The growth of alliances and the race of armaments since 1871", "The development of Russian policy", "Chronological sketch of the Crisis of 1914", and "The new German theory of the State".[4] He then joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, serving throughout the war, and in January 1919 was a temporary lieutenant.[5]

After the war, he returned to his fellowship at New College. His next book was a study of Matthew Prior.[6]

From 1944 to 1946, Legg was the principal editor for the Dictionary of National Biography, taking responsibility for supervising new entries.[7]

Personal life[edit]

In 1915, at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster,[8] Legg married Olive Maud, a daughter of William Percival Lindsay, Writer to the Signet, of Edinburgh. They had three daughters, and one son,[9] Kenneth, who died at Abingdon in 1939 aged fifteen.[10]

On 11 October 1945, in the chapel of New College, Oxford, their daughter Joan married Frank Willan, a Royal Air Force pilot.[11] Their daughter Olive married Edward T. Stewart-Jones in Chelsea in 1950.[12]

At the time of his death in December 1962, Legg was of 34, St Cross Road, Winchester, and died in the city at the Park House Nursing Home. He left an estate valued at £17,153, and probate was granted to Group Captain F. A. Willan CBE and E. T. Stewart-Jones, metallurgist.[13] His widow survived him until 1976.[14]

Selected works[edit]

  • Leopold George Wickham Legg, English Coronation Records (Westminster: A. Constable & Co., 1901)
  • Leopold George Wickham Legg, Select documents illustrative of the history of the French revolution (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1905)
  • L. G. Wickham Legg, “The Concordats”, in The Cambridge Modern History, Vol. IX (1906)
  • Leopold George Wickham Legg, C. H. Firth, Sophie Crawford Lomas, Notes on the Diplomatic Relations of England and France (Oxford: B. H. Blackwell, 1909)
  • Ernest Barker, H. W. Carless Davis, C. R. L. Fletcher, Arthur Hassall, L. G. Wickham Legg, F. Morgan, Why We Are at War: Great Britain's Case, by Members of the Oxford Faculty of Modern History (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1914)
  • Leopold George Wickham Legg, Matthew Prior: a study of his public career and correspondence (Cambridge University Press, 1921)
  • Leopold George Wickham Legg, British diplomatic instructions, 1689-1789 (London: Office of the Society, 1922)
  • L. G. W. Legg, ed., The Dictionary of National Biography: 1931–40 (Oxford University Press, 1950, ASIN B0043KPRJM)

References[edit]

  1. ^ ”LEGG Leopold George W. St. Geo. H. Sq. 1a 345” in General Index to Births in England and Wales, 1877
  2. ^ Baptisms Solemnized in the Parish of All Saints Margaret Street, p. 203, at ancestry.co.uk, accessed 18 May 2020 (subscription required)
  3. ^ Isaiah Berlin, Isaiah Berlin: Letters, 1928-1946, Volume 1 (Cambridge University Press, 2004), p. 298
  4. ^ Ernest Barker, H. W. Carless Davis, C. R. L. Fletcher, Arthur Hassall, L. G. Wickham Legg, F. Morgan, Why We Are at War: Great Britain's Case, by Members of the Oxford Faculty of Modern History (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1914)
  5. ^ The Navy List, January 1919, p. 1726 at ancestry.co.uk , accessed 18 May 2020 (subscription required)
  6. ^ Leopold George Wickham Legg, Matthew Prior: a study of his public career and correspondence (Cambridge University Press, 1921)
  7. ^ William Roger Louis, Ian Anders Gadd, Simon Eliot, History of Oxford University Press, Volume III, 1896 to 1970 (Oxford University Press, 2013), p. 340
  8. ^ “Legg Leopold G W Lindsay St. Martin 1a 1633”, “Lindsay Olive M Legg St. Martin 1a 1633”, in General Index to Marriages in England and Wales, 1915
  9. ^ “Legg, Leopold George Wickham” in Who Was Who 1961–1970 (A & C Black, 1979 reprint, ISBN 0-7136-2008-0)
  10. ^ “Legg Kenneth G W / Lindsay / Oxford 3a 1760”, in General Index to Births in England and Wales, 1924; “Legg Kenneth G W 15 Abingdon 2c 734” in General Index to Deaths in England and Wales, 1939
  11. ^ The Aeroplane, vol. 69 (1945), p. 494
  12. ^ ”Legg Olive H W / Stewart-Jones / Chelsea 5c 659”; “Stewart-Jones Edward T / Legg / Chelsea 5c 659” in General Index to Marriages in England and Wales, 1915
  13. ^ LEGG Leopold George Wickham in Probate Index for England and Wales, 1963, at probatesearch.gov.uk, accessed 18 May 2020
  14. ^ ”Legg Olive Maud 29JE1887 Paddington 14 1069” in General Index to Deaths in England and Wales, 1976

External links[edit]