List of most-subscribed YouTube channels

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The Indian music video channel T-Series[1] is the most-subscribed YouTube channel, with 225 million subscribers as of September 2022.[2]
The Indian entertainment channel SET India is the most-subscribed entertainment YouTube channel, with 143 million subscribers as of September 2022.[2]
Swedish Let's Player and web comedian PewDiePie[3][4] is the most-subscribed individual user on YouTube,[5][6] and the fourth most-subscribed YouTube channel overall, with 111 million subscribers as of April 2022.[2]

On the online video platform YouTube, a subscriber to a channel is a user who, by selecting that channel's "Subscribe" button, has chosen to receive content released by the channel. Each user's subscription feed consists of videos recently published by channels to which the account is subscribed.[7] The ability to subscribe to users was introduced in October 2005,[8] and the website began publishing a list of its "most subscribed Members" in April 2006.[9]

An early archive of the list dates to May 2006, at which time Smosh, with fewer than three thousand subscribers, occupied the number one position.[10] Since then, at least ten other YouTube channels have possessed the platform's largest subscriber count; these include Judson Laipply, Brookers, geriatric1927, lonelygirl15, Ryan Higa, Fred, Ray William Johnson and PewDiePie. The most-subscribed channel as of September 2022 is T-Series, an Indian music video publisher operated by the entertainment company of the same name. With a subscriber count of 223 million, the channel has held this distinction since April 14, 2019.

Most-subscribed channels

The following table lists the fifty most-subscribed YouTube channels,[A][2] as well as the primary language and content category of each channel. The channels are ordered by number of subscribers; those whose displayed subscriber counts are identical are listed so that the channel whose current growth rate indicates that its displayed subscriber count will exceed that of the other channel is listed first. Automatically-generated channels that lack their own videos (such as Music and News) and channels that have been made effectively obsolete as a result of the transferal of their content (such as JustinBieberVEVO and TaylorSwiftVEVO)[B] are excluded. As of April 2022, 22 of the 50 channels listed primarily produce content in English while 15 primarily produce content in Hindi.

Rank Channel Link Brand
channel
Subscribers
(millions)
Primary
language(s)
Content
category
Country
1 T-Series Link Yes 225 Hindi[11][12] Music  India
2 Cocomelon - Nursery Rhymes Link Yes 143 English Education  United States
3 SET India Link Yes 143 Hindi[13] Entertainment  India
4 PewDiePie Link 111 English Entertainment  Japan
5 MrBeast Link 104 English Entertainment  United States
6 Kids Diana Show Link Yes 101 English[14][15][16] Film  Ukraine
7 Like Nastya Link 100 English Entertainment  Russia
8 WWE Link Yes 91 English Sports  United States
9 Zee Music Company Link Yes 88.1 Hindi[17][18] Music  India
10 Vlad and Niki Link 86.6 English Entertainment  Russia
11 Blackpink Link 81.5 Korean Music  South Korea
12 5-Minute Crafts Link Yes 77.4 English How-to  Cyprus[a]
13 Goldmines Link Yes 76.5 Hindi Film  India
14 Sony SAB Link Yes 72.1 Hindi Entertainment  India
15 BANGTANTV Link 70.7 Korean Music  South Korea
16 Justin Bieber Link 70.1 English Music  Canada
17 HYBE LABELS Link Yes 68.2 Korean Music  South Korea
18 Canal KondZilla Link Yes 66 Portuguese Music  Brazil
19 Zee TV Link Yes 63.4 Hindi Entertainment  India
20 Shemaroo Filmi Gaane Link Yes 61.9 Hindi Music  India
21 Pinkfong Baby Shark Kids' Stories & Songs Link Yes 60.5 English Education  South Korea
22 ChuChu TV Nursery Rhymes & Kids Songs Link Yes 58.6 Hindi[20] Education  India
23 Dude Perfect Link 58.2 English Sports  United States
24 Movieclips Link Yes 57.8 English Film  United States
26 Colors TV Link Yes 56.3 Hindi Entertainment  India
25 Marshmello Link 55.9 English Music  United States
27 Wave Music Link Yes 54 Bhojpuri Music  India
28 EminemMusic Link 53. English Music  United States
Aaj Tak Link Yes 53.1 Hindi News Channel  India
30 Tips Official Link Yes 53 Hindi Music  India
31 T-Series Bhakti Sagar Link Yes 52.7 Hindi Music  India
32 Sony Music India Link Yes 52.6 Hindi Music  India
33 Ed Sheeran Link 52.4 English Music  United Kingdom
34 El Reino Infantil Link Yes 51.9 Spanish Music  Argentina
35 Ariana Grande Link 51.8 English Music  United States
36 LooLoo Kids - Nursery Rhymes and Children's Songs Link Yes 49.9 English Music  United States
37 YRF Link Yes 47.8 Hindi Music  India
38 Taylor Swift Link 47.4 English Music  United States
39 BillionSurpriseToys - English Kids Songs & Cartoon Link Yes 46.3 English Entertainment  United States
Billie Eilish Link 46.6 English Music  United States
41 JuegaGerman Link 46.2 Spanish Music  Chile
42 Infobells - Hindi Link Yes 45.9 Hindi Education  India
43 Badabun Link Yes 45.7 Spanish Entertainment  Mexico
44 Fernanfloo Link 45.2 Spanish Gaming  El Salvador
45 Felipe Neto Link 44.4 Portuguese Entertainment  Brazil
46 BRIGHT SIDE Link Yes 43.9 English Education  Cyprus[a]
whinderssonnunes Link 43.9 Portuguese Comedy  Brazil
48 HolaSoyGerman. Link 43.3 Spanish Entertainment  Chile
Você Sabia Link 43.3 Portuguese Entertainment  Brazil
50 Katy Perry Link 43.3 English Music  United States
As of August 19, 2022 UTC
  1. ^ a b TheSoul Publishing is currently based in Cyprus; it was originally based in Russia and is still Russian-owned.[19]

Historical progression of most-subscribed channels

The following table lists the 19 distinct runs as the most-subscribed YouTube channel recorded since May 2006. Only runs lasting at least 24 hours are included. 11 different channels have held title, with PewDiePie holding the title a record 4 times. Smosh (3 times) and nigahiga, YouTube Spotlight, and T-Series (2 times each) are the only other channels to have held the title during multiple different stretches.

  Former record for days held
  Current record for days held
Channel name Date achieved Days held Reference
Smosh (1) May 17, 2006 18 [10][21]
Judson Laipply June 4, 2006 29 [22][23][24]
Brookers July 3, 2006 45 [25][26][27]
geriatric1927 August 17, 2006 26 [28][29]
lonelygirl15 September 12, 2006 226 [30][31][32][33]
Smosh (2) April 26, 2007 517 [21][34]
nigahiga September 24, 2008 12 [35][36]
FЯED October 6, 2008 318 [36][37]
nigahiga (2) August 20, 2009 677 [35][38][39]
Ray William Johnson June 28, 2011 564 [40][41][42]
Smosh (3) January 12, 2013 215 [21][43][44]
PewDiePie (1) August 15, 2013 79 [45][46]
YouTube Spotlight[C] (1) November 2, 2013 36 [47][48][49]
PewDiePie (2) December 8, 2013 4 [50][51]
YouTube Spotlight (2) December 12, 2013 11 [52][51]
PewDiePie (3) December 23, 2013 1920 [53][54][55]
T-Series (1) March 27, 2019[D] 5 [59][61]
PewDiePie (4) April 1, 2019 13 [60][62][63]
T-Series (2) April 14, 2019 1260 [64][65]
As of September 25, 2022 UTC

Timeline

Timeline of the most-subscribed YouTube channels (May 2006 – present)

T-Series (company)YouTube (channel)PewDiePieRay William JohnsonFred FigglehornRyan Higalonelygirl15Peter OakleyBrooke BrodackJudson LaipplySmosh

Milestones and reactions

Channel Subscriber milestone Date achieved Reference
Brookers 10,000 July 7, 2006 [66]
geriatric1927 20,000 August 18, 2006 [67]
lonelygirl15 50,000 October 23, 2006 [68]
Smosh 100,000 May 15, 2007 [69]
FЯED 1 million April 7, 2009 [70]
nigahiga 2 million March 13, 2010 [71]
RayWilliamJohnson 5 million November 15, 2011 [72]
Smosh 10 million May 25, 2013 [73]
PewDiePie 20 million January 9, 2014 [74]
50 million December 8, 2016 [75]
T-Series 100 million May 29, 2019 [76]
200 million November 30, 2021 [77]

Following the third time that Smosh became the most-subscribed YouTube channel, Ray William Johnson collaborated with the duo.[78] A flurry of top YouTubers including Ryan Higa, Shane Dawson, Felix Kjellberg, Michael Buckley, Kassem Gharaibeh, the Fine Brothers, and Johnson himself, congratulated the duo shortly after they surpassed Johnson as the most-subscribed channel.[79]

PewDiePie vs T-Series

In mid-2018, the subscriber count of the Indian music video channel T-Series rapidly approached that of Swedish web comedian and Let's Player PewDiePie, who was the most-subscribed user on YouTube at the time.[80][81] As a result, fans of PewDiePie and T-Series, other YouTubers, and celebrities showed their support for both channels. During the competition, both channels gained a large number of subscribers at a rapid rate, and surpassed each other's subscriber count on multiple occasions in February, March, and April 2019.[56][57][58][60] T-Series eventually permanently surpassed PewDiePie, and on May 29, it became the first channel to gain 100 million subscribers.[76]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The total number of channels listed may exceed fifty if a tie exists for the fiftieth-highest subscriber count.
  2. ^ These are not to be mistaken for the channels Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift, both of which are included.
  3. ^ Although now called simply "YouTube", YouTube's official channel was named "YouTube Spotlight" in 2013.
  4. ^ T-Series surpassed PewDiePie in subscriber count on numerous occasions, each lasting fewer than 24 hours, from February to late March 2019.[56][57][58] The first incident to last at least 24 hours began on March 27 and ended on April 1.[59][60]

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