MTV Video Music Award for Best Female Video

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MTV Video Music Award
for Best Female Video
Awarded forFemale music videos
CountryUnited States
Presented byMTV
First awarded1984
Last awarded2016
Most awards
Most nominationsMadonna (12)
WebsiteVMA website

The MTV Video Music Award for Best Female Video is one of the original general awards that has been handed out every year since the first annual MTV Video Music Awards in 1984. In 2007, however, the award was briefly renamed Female Artist of the Year, and it awarded the artist's whole body of work for that year rather than a specific video. In 2008, though, the award returned to its original name. The category would become defunct beginning with the 2017 ceremony after the gender specific categories would be merged into the Artist of the Year category.

Madonna, Taylor Swift and Beyoncé are the biggest winners with three wins each, while the former also holds the record for most nominations with 12. Meanwhile, Beyoncé, Kelly Clarkson and Lady Gaga are the only artists to win the award for two consecutive years.

Recipients[edit]

Cyndi Lauper playing a guitar.
Inaugural winner Cyndi Lauper pictured in 2008
Madonna performing.
Madonna is the most nominated artist and won the award three times: 1987, 1995 and 1998
Lauryn Hill performing.
In 1999, Lauryn Hill became the first rapper to win the award
Beyoncé performing.
Beyoncé won the award for two consecutive years, has won the award three times and is the second most nominated with ten
Taylor Swift at the Red Tour.
The 2009, 2013 and 2015 winner Taylor Swift for her music videos "You Belong with Me", "I Knew You Were Trouble" and "Blank Space". She is tied with Madonna and Beyoncé for the most wins in this category
Lady Gaga performing.
The 2010 and 2011 winner Lady Gaga for her music videos "Bad Romance" and "Born This Way." She is the third artist to win the award for two consecutive years
Katy Perry performing.
Katy Perry has won the award in 2014 for "Dark Horse". She is the third most nominated artist in this category, tied with Janet Jackson
Year Winner(s) Nominees Ref.
Work Artist
1984 "Girls Just Want to Have Fun" Cyndi Lauper [1]
1985 "What's Love Got to Do with It" Tina Turner [2]
1986 "How Will I Know" Whitney Houston [3]
1987 "Papa Don't Preach" Madonna [4]
1988 "Luka" Suzanne Vega [5]
1989 "Straight Up" Paula Abdul [6]
1990 "Nothing Compares 2 U" Sinéad O'Connor [7]
1991 "Love Will Never Do (Without You)" Janet Jackson [8]
1992 "Why" Annie Lennox [9]
1993 "Constant Craving" k.d. lang [10]
1994 "If" Janet Jackson [11]
1995 "Take a Bow" Madonna [12]
1996 "Ironic" Alanis Morissette [13]
1997 "You Were Meant for Me" Jewel [14]
1998 "Ray of Light" Madonna
[15]
1999 "Doo Wop (That Thing)" Lauryn Hill [16]
2000 "Try Again" Aaliyah [17]
2001 "Let Me Blow Ya Mind" Eve (feat. Gwen Stefani) [18]
2002 "Get the Party Started" Pink [19]
2003 "Crazy in Love" Beyoncé (feat. Jay Z) [20]
2004 "Naughty Girl" Beyoncé [21]
2005 "Since U Been Gone" Kelly Clarkson [22]
2006 "Because of You" [23]
2007 (award presented only to artist) Fergie [24]
2008 "Piece of Me" Britney Spears [25]
2009 "You Belong with Me" Taylor Swift [26]
2010 "Bad Romance" Lady Gaga
[27]
2011 "Born This Way" [28]
2012 "Starships" Nicki Minaj [29]
2013 "I Knew You Were Trouble" Taylor Swift [30]
2014 "Dark Horse" Katy Perry (feat. Juicy J)
[31]
2015 "Blank Space" Taylor Swift [32]
2016 "Hold Up" Beyoncé
[33]

Records/Stats[edit]

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
Artist
Total nominations 12 10 6 5 4 3

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1984". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  2. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1985". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  3. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1986". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  4. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1987". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  5. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1988". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  6. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1989". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  7. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1990". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  8. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1991". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  9. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1992". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  10. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1993". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  11. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1994". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  12. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1995". MTV. Archived from the original on May 10, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  13. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1996". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  14. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1997". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  15. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1998". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  16. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1999". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  17. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2000". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  18. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2001". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  19. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2002". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  20. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2003". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  21. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2004". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  22. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2005". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  23. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2006". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  24. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2007". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  25. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2008". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  26. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2009". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  27. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2010". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  28. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2011". MTV. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  29. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2012". MTV. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  30. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2013". MTV. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  31. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2014". MTV. Retrieved August 31, 2015.
  32. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2015". MTV. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  33. ^ "2016 VMA Nominations: See the Full List Now". MTV News. Retrieved July 26, 2016.