MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year

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MTV Video Music Award
for Video of the Year
Logo of MTV
Logo of MTV
Awarded forMusic videos
CountryUnited States
Presented byMTV
First awarded1984
Currently held byThe Weeknd – "Blinding Lights" (2020)
Most awards
Most nominationsEminem (7)
WebsiteOfficial website

The MTV Video Music Award for Video of the Year is the most prestigious competitive award and the final award presented at the annual MTV Video Music Awards.[1] The award was created by the US network MTV to honor artists with the best music videos.[2] At the first MTV Video Music Awards ceremony in 1984, the Video of the Year honor was presented to the Cars for the video "You Might Think".[3] Originally, the winners were determined by a specialized panel of music video directors, producers, and record company executives.[4] Since the 2006 awards, the winners are determined by viewers' votes through MTV's website.[5]

Eminem holds the record for the most nominations, with seven as a lead artist.[b] Beyoncé has the second-most nominations, with five as a lead artist. Among artists who are not from the U.S., Rihanna (Barbados) and U2 (Ireland) share the record for the most nominations, with four each.[6] Four musicians share the most wins, with two each: Eminem for "The Real Slim Shady" (2000) and "Without Me" (2002), Rihanna for "Umbrella" (2007) and "We Found Love" (2012), Beyoncé for "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" (2009) and "Formation" (2016) and Taylor Swift for "Bad Blood" (2015) and "You Need to Calm Down" (2019).[7][a]

David Lee Roth (1985), U2 (1988), and Lady Gaga (2010) are the only artists to have two Video of the Year nominations as a lead artist in a single ceremony.[7] Among them, Gaga was the only to win, with "Bad Romance". Two artists have won Video of the Year and been honored with the Video Vanguard Award—an honorary award for artists who had "profound impact" on music videos and popular culture—in the same night: Peter Gabriel in 1987 with "Sledgehammer" and Justin Timberlake in 2013 with "Mirrors".[9][10] Kendrick Lamar and Taylor Swift are the only artists to have won the award for a video they co-directed: Lamar for "Humble" in 2017, and Swift for "You Need to Calm Down" in 2019.[c]

Recipients[edit]

A man wearing a blue-shade shirt performing on a microphone on one hand while raising the other
Peter Gabriel, the winner in 1987 for "Sledgehammer". He also won the Vanguard Award the same night.
A hairless woman performing on a guitar and a microphone
1990 recipient Sinéad O'Connor, winning for "Nothing Compares 2 U"
A two-piece band performing, with one on a guitar and a microphone, and the other on drums
The Smashing Pumpkins won for their video "Tonight, Tonight" in 1996.
A woman wearing a high-rise blouse and long lace gloves performing on a microphone
1998 recipient Madonna, winning for "Ray of Light"
Side profile of a man wearing black hat, black coat and black shirt
Two-time award winner Eminem, winning in 2000 for "The Real Slim Shady" and in 2002 for "Without Me"
A woman performing on a microphone
Rihanna won in 2007 for "Umbrella", and in 2012 for "We Found Love".
A woman holding a microphone, wearing a bodysuit
Two-time award winner Beyoncé, winning for "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" in 2009 and "Formation" in 2016
A woman performing on a microphone, wearing a sparkling dress
Two-time winner Taylor Swift, winning for "Bad Blood" (2015) and "You Need to Calm Down" (2019)
A man wearing white shirt performing on a microphone
2017 winner Kendrick Lamar, winning for "Humble", a video he co-directed
Recipients
Year[d] Winner(s) Video Nominees Ref.
1984 The Cars "You Might Think" [3]
1985 Don Henley "The Boys of Summer" [11]
1986 Dire Straits "Money for Nothing" [12]
1987 Peter Gabriel "Sledgehammer" [13]
1988 INXS "Need You Tonight" / "Mediate" [14]
1989 Neil Young "This Note's for You" [15]
1990 Sinéad O'Connor "Nothing Compares 2 U" [16]
1991 R.E.M. "Losing My Religion" [17]
1992 Van Halen "Right Now" [18]
1993 Pearl Jam "Jeremy" [19]
1994 Aerosmith "Cryin'" [20]
1995 TLC "Waterfalls" [21]
1996 The Smashing Pumpkins "Tonight, Tonight" [22]
1997 Jamiroquai "Virtual Insanity" [23]
1998 Madonna "Ray of Light" [24]
1999 Lauryn Hill "Doo Wop (That Thing)" [25]
2000 Eminem "The Real Slim Shady" [26]
2001 Christina Aguilera, Lil' Kim, Mýa and P!nk
(featuring Missy Elliott)
"Lady Marmalade" [27]
2002 Eminem "Without Me" [28]
2003 Missy Elliott "Work It" [29]
2004 Outkast "Hey Ya!"
[30]
2005 Green Day "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" [31]
2006 Panic! at the Disco "I Write Sins Not Tragedies" [32]
2007 Rihanna
(featuring Jay-Z)
"Umbrella" [33]
2008 Britney Spears "Piece of Me" [34]
2009 Beyoncé "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" [35]
2010 Lady Gaga "Bad Romance" [36]
2011 Katy Perry "Firework" [37]
2012 Rihanna
(featuring Calvin Harris)
"We Found Love"
[38]
2013 Justin Timberlake "Mirrors" [39]
2014 Miley Cyrus "Wrecking Ball"
[40]
2015 Taylor Swift
(featuring Kendrick Lamar)
"Bad Blood"
[41]
2016 Beyoncé "Formation" [42]
2017 Kendrick Lamar "Humble" [43]
2018 Camila Cabello
(featuring Young Thug)
"Havana" [44]
2019 Taylor Swift "You Need to Calm Down" [45]
2020 The Weeknd "Blinding Lights" [46]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wins as featured/guest artists are not taken into account, therefore Missy Elliott and Kendrick Lamar are not listed.[8]
  2. ^ Eminem has one more nomination as part of the collective D12.[6]
  3. ^ Kendrick Lamar co-directed "Humble" as part of the Little Homies.[8]
  4. ^ Each year is linked to the article about the MTV Video Music Awards held that year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ D'Angelo, Joe (August 29, 2002). "Eminem Takes Home Most Moonmen from Video Music Awards". MTV News. Retrieved February 27, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Elliot, Stuart (August 20, 2004). "MTV's sponsors hope the Video Music Awards can draw a crowd, without wardrobe malfunctions". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 29, 2012. Retrieved January 23, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "MTV Video Music Awards 1984". MTV. Archived from the original on June 5, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  4. ^ Mantzouranis, Tom (August 28, 2015). "The Inside Story Of How The First MTV VMAs Created A Tradition Of Making Censors Sweat". Uproxx. Archived from the original on December 3, 2020. Retrieved January 23, 2021.
  5. ^ "MTV Announces VMA Nominees". Spin. July 31, 2006. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved August 31, 2015.
  6. ^ a b Grein, Paul (July 30, 2020). "Billie Eilish, Eminem, Taylor Swift & Other Artists Who Made History in the 2020 VMA Nominations". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 4, 2020. Retrieved January 23, 2021.
  7. ^ a b "MTV Video Music Awards – Biggest Winners". MTV. Archived from the original on March 17, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  8. ^ a b Grein, Paul (August 26, 2019). "12 Records That Were Set at the 2019 VMAs". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 30, 2020. Retrieved October 8, 2019.
  9. ^ Fabian, Renée (August 15, 2017). "Pink: 2017 VMAs Video Vanguard Award Honoree". The Recording Academy. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  10. ^ Rosenbaum, Marty (August 20, 2020). "2020 MTV VMAs: Looking Back at Every 'Video Vanguard Award' Winner". Radio.com. Archived from the original on October 20, 2020. Retrieved January 23, 2021.
  11. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1985". MTV. Archived from the original on April 8, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  12. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1986". MTV. Archived from the original on December 27, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  13. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1987". MTV. Archived from the original on July 4, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  14. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1988". MTV. Archived from the original on August 21, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  15. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1989". MTV. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  16. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1990". MTV. Archived from the original on February 19, 2017. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  17. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1991". MTV. Archived from the original on October 18, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  18. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1992". MTV. Archived from the original on June 30, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  19. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1993". MTV. Archived from the original on April 19, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  20. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1994". MTV. Archived from the original on May 4, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  21. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1995". MTV. Archived from the original on May 10, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  22. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1996". MTV. Archived from the original on June 12, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  23. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1997". MTV. Archived from the original on September 1, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  24. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1998". MTV. Archived from the original on July 4, 2012. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  25. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 1999". MTV. Archived from the original on September 12, 2008. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  26. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2000". MTV. Archived from the original on March 25, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  27. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2001". MTV. Archived from the original on February 16, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  28. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2002". MTV. Archived from the original on August 18, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  29. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2003". MTV. Archived from the original on April 22, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  30. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2004". MTV. Archived from the original on April 8, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  31. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2005". MTV. Archived from the original on July 15, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  32. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2006". MTV. Archived from the original on February 6, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  33. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2007". MTV. Archived from the original on April 8, 2013. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  34. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2008". MTV. Archived from the original on December 14, 2009. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  35. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2009". MTV. Archived from the original on February 12, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  36. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2010". MTV. Archived from the original on February 5, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  37. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2011". MTV. Archived from the original on February 3, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  38. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2012". MTV. Archived from the original on January 25, 2015. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  39. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2013". MTV. Archived from the original on June 8, 2016. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  40. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2014". MTV. Archived from the original on March 12, 2015. Retrieved August 7, 2014.
  41. ^ "MTV Video Music Awards 2015". MTV. Archived from the original on June 8, 2016. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  42. ^ "2016 VMA Nominations: See the Full List Now". MTV News. Archived from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved July 26, 2016.
  43. ^ "2017 VMA Winners and Performances". MTV. August 27, 2017. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved August 27, 2017.
  44. ^ Nordyke, Kimberly (August 20, 2018). "VMAs: Winners List". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved August 20, 2018.
  45. ^ "Here Are All the Winners From the 2019 MTV VMAs". Billboard. August 26, 2019. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  46. ^ Melas, Chloe (August 30, 2020). "MTV VMAs 2020: Lady Gaga, The Weeknd and more take home awards". CNN. Retrieved January 25, 2021.

External links[edit]