My Tears Ricochet

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"My Tears Ricochet"
Song by Taylor Swift
from the album Folklore
ReleasedJuly 24, 2020 (2020-07-24)
Recorded2020
Studio
  • Kitty Committee Studio (Los Angeles)
  • Long Pond (Hudson Valley)
GenreArena-goth
Length4:15
LabelRepublic
Songwriter(s)Taylor Swift
Producer(s)
Lyric video
"My Tears Ricochet" on YouTube

"My Tears Ricochet" is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift. It is the fifth track on Swift's eighth studio album, Folklore (2020), which was released on July 24, 2020, through Republic Records. It is the only track on the album written solely by Swift. The track was produced by Swift, Jack Antonoff and Joe Alwyn.

"My Tears Ricochet" features layered backing vocals from producer Jack Antonoff over shuddering drums. Lyrically, the song is narrated from the perspective of a dead woman narrating her funeral. The song debuted in the top 10 on singles charts in Australia, Malaysia and Singapore, and in the top 20 in Canada and the United States.

Background and composition[edit]

In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, Swift said that, following the sale of her master recordings to Scooter Braun, narratives around divorce had been triggering her, and she incorporated imagery of the end of marriage into "My Tears Ricochet", writing the first lines of the song after watching the 2019 film Marriage Story, which tells the story of a divorce.[1][2] The track "My Tears Ricochet" is an arena-goth ballad about the specter of a dead woman haunting her tormentors at her funeral.[3][4] Backing vocals on the track are also provided from producer Jack Antonoff.[5]

Critical reception[edit]

"My Tears Ricochet" received widespread acclaim from critics. Writing for NME, Hannah Mylrea drew comparisons between "My Tears Ricochet" and "Clean" from Swift's record 1989, remarking that "a megawatt pop song is encased in layered vocals and twinkling music box instrumentals".[6] Jody Rosen of the Los Angeles Times said in a review that the track built up to "a tumultuous climax", and that the track was "goth, like Chartres Cathedral is goth".[7] Billboard's Jason Lipshutz wrote that the song "builds into a sorrowful anthem", and that "a bitter parting becomes a literal death".[5] In a piece for Slant Magazine, Eric Mason named this track "one of Folklore’s most straightforwardly resentful stories", saying that "the sharp beats of strings on the chorus recall the bridges of early-2010s Swift songs", comparing it with "Mad Woman" and "Cruel Summer".[8]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from Tidal.[9]

  • Taylor Swift – vocals, songwriting, production
  • Jack Antonoff – backing vocals, production, recording, live drums, percussion, programming, electric guitars, keyboards, piano, bass
  • Joe Alwyn – producer
  • Laura Sisk – recording
  • John Rooney – assistant engineering
  • Jon Sher – assistant engineering
  • Serban Ghenea – mixing
  • Randy Merrill – mastering
  • Evan Smith – saxophones, keyboard, programming
  • Bobby Hawk – strings

Charts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Suskind, Alex. "Taylor Swift broke all her rules with Folklore — and gave herself a much-needed escape". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 12, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  2. ^ Gallagher, Alex (December 9, 2020). "Taylor Swift wrote early 'My Tears Ricochet' lyrics after watching 'Marriage Story'". NME. Archived from the original on January 22, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  3. ^ Wood, Mikael (June 26, 2020). "Taylor Swift's 'Folklore': All 16 songs, ranked". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 29, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  4. ^ Sheffield, Rob (November 24, 2020). "All 173 of Taylor Swift's Songs, Ranked". Rolling Stone. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  5. ^ a b Lipshutz, Jason (July 24, 2020). "Every Song Ranked on Taylor Swift's 'Folklore': Critic's Picks". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 6, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  6. ^ Mylrea, Hannah (July 24, 2020). "Taylor Swift – 'Folklore' review: pop superstar undergoes an extraordinary indie-folk makeover". NME. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  7. ^ Rosen, Jody (July 24, 2020). "Review: Taylor Swift's radically intimate 'Folklore' is the perfect quar album". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 11, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  8. ^ Mason, Eric (September 12, 2020). "Every Song on Taylor Swift's Folklore Ranked". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on January 29, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  9. ^ "Folklore by Taylor Swift". Tidal. Archived from the original on April 24, 2021. Retrieved April 24, 2021.
  10. ^ "Australian-charts.com – Taylor Swift – My Tears Ricochet". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  11. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canadian Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  12. ^ "Top 20 Most Streamed International & Domestic Singles in Malaysia". Recording Industry Association of Malaysia. Recording Industry Association of Malaysia. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  13. ^ "Portuguesecharts.com – Taylor Swift – My Tears Ricochet". AFP Top 100 Singles. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  14. ^ "RIAS International Top Charts Week 31". Recording Industry Association (Singapore). Archived from the original on September 10, 2020.
  15. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Taylor Swift – My Tears Ricochet". Singles Top 100. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  16. ^ "Official Audio Streaming Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved February 21, 2021.
  17. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  18. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot Rock & Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  19. ^ "Top 100 Songs, July 24, 2020 - July 30, 2020". Rolling Stone. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  20. ^ "Hot Rock & Alternative Songs – Year-End 2020". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 11, 2021. Retrieved December 4, 2020.

External links[edit]