Pinocchio (2022 animated film)

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Guillermo del Toro's
Pinocchio
A wooden puppet stands in a doorway. In front of him is a creature resembling a winged lion.
Release poster
Directed by
Screenplay by
Story by
Based onThe Adventures of Pinocchio
by Carlo Collodi
Produced by
  • Guillermo del Toro
  • Lisa Henson
  • Gary Ungar
  • Alexander Bulkley
  • Corey Campodonico
Starring
CinematographyFrank Passingham
Edited byKen Schretzmann
Music byAlexandre Desplat[1]
Production
companies
Distributed byNetflix
Release dates
  • October 15, 2022 (2022-10-15) (LFF)
  • November 9, 2022 (2022-11-09) (United States)
  • December 9, 2022 (2022-12-09) (Netflix)
Running time
114 minutes[3]
Countries
  • United States
  • Mexico
LanguageEnglish
Budget$35 million[4]

Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio (or simply Pinocchio) is a 2022 stop-motion animated musical fantasy film directed by Guillermo del Toro and Mark Gustafson (in his feature directorial debut) from a screenplay by del Toro and Patrick McHale.[5] The film is based on Gris Grimly's design from his 2002 edition of the 1883 Italian novel The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. It stars the voices of Ewan McGregor, David Bradley, Gregory Mann, Burn Gorman, John Turturro, Ron Perlman, Finn Wolfhard, Cate Blanchett, Tim Blake Nelson, Christoph Waltz, and Tilda Swinton.

Pinocchio was announced by del Toro in 2008 and originally scheduled to be released in 2013 or 2014, but the project went into development hell. In January 2017, McHale was announced to co-write the script, but the production was suspended in November 2017 as no studios were willing to provide financing. It was revived the following year after being acquired by Netflix.

Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio had its world premiere at the BFI London Film Festival on October 15, 2022. It was released in select cinemas on November 9, 2022 and in streaming on December 9, by Netflix. The film was acclaimed by critics, who praised Del Toro and Gustafson's direction, the writing, the animation, the score, and the voice acting.

Plot[edit]

A retelling of the famous Italian Carlo Collodi fairytale about a wooden puppet, who comes to life and dreams of becoming a real boy, that takes place in 1930s Fascist Italy, Pinocchio is "a story of love and disobedience as Pinocchio struggles to live up to his father's expectations, learning the true meaning of life."[6]

Voice cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Guillermo del Toro worked on the film since 2008

In 2008, Guillermo del Toro announced that his next project, a darker adaptation of the Italian novel The Adventures of Pinocchio, was in development. He has called Pinocchio his passion project, stating that: "no art form has influenced my life and my work more than animation and no single character in history has had as deep of a personal connection to me as Pinocchio", and "I've wanted to make this movie for as long as I can remember".[12] On February 17, 2011, it was announced that Gris Grimly and Mark Gustafson would co-direct a stop-motion animated Pinocchio film written by del Toro alongside his long-time collaborator Matthew Robbins, and Grimly based by Grimly's designs, with del Toro producing along with The Jim Henson Company and Pathé.[13] Grimly devised Pinocchio's look for the film, depicting him as unfinished wood.[7] On May 17, 2012, del Toro took over for Grimly.[14] In February 2012, Del Toro released some concept arts with the designs of Pinocchio, Geppetto, the Talking Cricket, Mangiafuoco and the Fox and the Cat. On July 30, 2012, it was announced that the film would be produced and animated by ShadowMachine. It was originally scheduled to be released in 2013 or 2014,[15] but the project went into development hell, with no further informations for years.

On January 23, 2017, Patrick McHale was announced to co-write the script with del Toro.[16] On August 31, 2017, del Toro told IndieWire and at the 74th Venice International Film Festival that the film will need a budget increase of $35 million more dollars or it would be cancelled.[17] On November 8, 2017, he reported that the project was not happening, because no studios were willing to finance it.[18] At one point, Matthew Robbins considered making the film as a 2D-animated film with French artist Joann Sfar to bring the costs down, but del Toro eventually decided that it had to be stop-motion, even if the higher budget made it harder to get greenlit.[19] However, on October 22, 2018, it was announced that the film had been revived, with Netflix acquiring it, and Pathé no longer involved.[20]

Writing[edit]

To me, it's essential to counter the idea that you have to change into a flesh-and-blood child to be a real human. All you need to be human is to really behave like one, you know? I have never believed that transformation [should] be demanded to gain love.

Guillermo del Toro's thoughts on the film's core idea.[7]

Guillermo del Toro always found himself intrigued at the similarities between Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein: both stories tell how a "child" is thrown into the real world and are brought to life by a father who expects them to figure out by themselves essential values such as the difference between good and bad, morals, ethics, love and life; in other words, the ideas that make people humans, themes that del Toro felt that reminded him of his childhood. The Frankenstein comparition partly inspired del Toro to give his Pinocchio take a gothic direction, but the film was always crafted to be family friendly so he could connect across generations and bring them out a sense of compassion, a lesson del Toro feels that it's necessary for kids who are demanded tremendous complexity nowadays.[7]

In del Toro's Pinocchio, the title character's wood is carved from a tree that grows over the grave of Carlo, Gepetto's son, leading Pinocchio to give his grief-blinded father another chance at fatherhood after Gepetto wishes for another chance to be a parent. However, Pinocchio's rowdy, exuberant and wild in contrast to the well-behaved and docile Carlo. Another change of characterization comes from Sebastian J. Cricket, the Talking Cricket, who egotistically annoys Pinocchio with his self-importance in an attempt to be his conscience, but Pinocchio eventually makes him realize that he actually has to learn to behave himself and discover love and humility. Akin to the original book, Cricket gets killed across the film, but comes back anyway to fulfill his character arc.[7] Along with Pinocchio and Sebastian, the Wood Sprite is one of the three magical creatures in the story, as del Toro didn't wish to for magical creatures to appear in his film, not wishing for characters such as the Fox and the Cat or the donkey-transforming Land of the Toys, desiring more realism closer to real life. For the film's villains, del Toro created the character of Count Volpe as an homage and amalgation of the Fox and the Cat and Mangiafuoco as well while for the donkey transforming subplot, The Coachman is replaced by the Podestà, a Fascist official who wishes to recruit Pinocchio into Italy's armed forces to fight against their enemies and ensure a soldier like him cannot be killed. Candlewick's characterization also changes into that of a bully who eventually redeems himself.[7]

Instead of a fairy tale setting like most versions of the story, the film's plot takes place in Fascist Italy around the 1930s, between World War I and World War II, during the rise of the Italian fascism and Benito Mussolini's authoritarian Italian rule. Hence, Pinocchio comes to life in a political environment where citizens behave like "obedient puppets", but Pinocchio doesn't imitate everyone. In another deviation from most Pinocchio versions, feeling that the original book sought the domestication of a child's soul in a way that del Toro perceives as blind obedience, del Toro identified Pinocchio's virtue to be the act of disobeying, assuming that while the book seems to favor that kids should obey their parents and be good, his movie focuses more on discovering yourself and decide what commandments given to you are acceptable or not. In del Toro's words, the film consists on numerous variations of father-son relationships, such as Gepetto initially refusing to accept Pinocchio as Carlo's replacement, feeling a bit of blame for creating the "freakish monster" the town hates.[7]

A common Pinocchio plot point in most cinematographic versions of the story have Pinocchio becoming a real boy at the end, but del Toro's Pinocchio counters that subplot due to his essential feelings that someone just needs to behave as a human to be treated as one, never actually believing that Pinocchio would gain his father's love by becoming a flesh-and-blood boy.[7]

Casting[edit]

On January 31, 2020, it was announced Ron Perlman, Tilda Swinton, Ewan McGregor, Christoph Waltz and David Bradley had joined the cast of the film.[21] Daniel Radcliffe, Tom Waits and Christopher Walken were previously considered. Radcliffe would later instead remain as executive producer of the movie.[22] On August 19, 2020, Gregory Mann, Cate Blanchett, Tim Blake Nelson, Finn Wolfhard, John Turturro and Burn Gorman joined the cast of the film.[23] Mann's vocal performance as Pinocchio gave him a "silly and sunny" personality who longs to learn about the world and meet everyone, but given how he was created with the wood of the tree next to Carlo's grave, his roots are somewhat sad.[7]

Filming[edit]

Filming commenced in Guadalajara, Mexico and Portland, Oregon by January 31, 2020.[21] The afterlife sequences and the end credits scene were animated by studio El Taller de Chucho in Guadalajara. [24]

Visual effects[edit]

The film's production quality was formed through the ornate detail of the sets and characters with their own textures in order to reinterpret Collodi's work in a way that differed from the 1940 Disney animated film adaptation: "I have been very vocal about my admiration and my great, great love for Disney all my life, but that is an impulse that actually makes me move away from that version. I think it is a pinnacle of Disney animation. It’s done in the most beautiful, hand-drawn 2D animation", del Toro was quoted to say by Vanity Fair.[7] Moving Picture Company worked on the visual effects for the movie.

Music[edit]

On January 8, 2020, Alexandre Desplat started composing the film's score, as well as writing original songs for the film.[1] The film marks the second time Desplat and del Toro collaborated on a film, the first being The Shape of Water.[1] On August 23, 2012, Nick Cave was originally attached to compose the score for the film before he was replaced as the film's composer by Desplat 8 years later.[25]

Release[edit]

In November 2018, Netflix set the film's release date for 2021.[26] In January 2021, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos revealed that the film's release could be moved to 2022 or later, with Netflix's notion of releasing six animated films a year.[27] In December 2021, del Toro stated it will be released in the last quarter of 2022.[28] In January and July 2022, with the release of the film's first prologue, it was announced for a December release.[29]

Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio had its world premiere at the BFI London Film Festival on October 15, 2022.[30][31] The film was followed by its United States premiere at 2022 AFI Fest on November 5, 2022.[32] The film was released in select cinemas on November 9, 2022, before streaming on Netflix on December 9, 2022.[33][34] One of the theatres scheduled to show the film on November 11, 2022 was the TIFF Bell Lightbox in Toronto, Ontario.[35]

Simon & Schuster adapted the film's screenplay to novel form.[36]

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, 97% of 101 critics' reviews are positive, with an average rating of 8.4/10. The website's consensus reads, "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio delivers fully on its title -- which is to say it's a visually stunning adaptation that embraces its source material's darkness."[37] Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned the film a score of 83 out of 100, based on 26 critics, indicating "universal acclaim".[38]

Accolades[edit]

Award Date of ceremony Category Recipient(s) Result Ref.
Hollywood Music in Media Awards November 16, 2022 Best Original Score in an Animated Film Alexandre Desplat Won [39]
Best Original Song in an Animated Film Alexandre Desplat, Roeben Katz, and Guillermo del Toro ("Ciao Papa") Won
Music Themed Film, Biopic or Musical Pinocchio Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Alexandre Desplat to Reteam with Guillermo del Toro on Netflix Animated Movie 'Pinocchio'". Film Music Reporter. January 8, 2020. Archived from the original on February 7, 2020. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  2. ^ Acosta, Gabriel (April 27, 2021). "Pinocchio empieza a cobrar vida en el Taller del Chucho en Guadalajara (Pinocchio begins to come to life at El Taller del Chucho in Guadalajara)". Publimetro (in Spanish). Archived from the original on November 21, 2021. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  3. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio at BFI London Film Festival". Archived from the original on 2022-09-01. Retrieved 2022-09-01.
  4. ^ Sharf, Zack (August 31, 2017). "Guillermo del Toro's 'Pinocchio' Isn't Dead Yet, But He Needs $35 Million to Make It". IndieWire. Archived from the original on February 6, 2020. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  5. ^ "Netflix Blitz at Annecy: 'Entergalactic' Date; New Pics from 'Pinocchio,' 'Sea Beast'; 'LD+R' Featurette". 15 June 2022. Archived from the original on 16 June 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  6. ^ Netflix Film [@NetflixFilm] (19 August 2020). "Set during the rise of Fascism in Mussolini's Italy, PINOCCHIO — a musical directed by del Toro and Mark Gustafson (FANTASTIC MR. FOX) with a score by Alexandre Desplat — is a story of love and disobedience as Pinocchio struggles to live up to his father's expectations" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Breznican, Anthony (14 June 2022). "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio Carves a New Path: An Exclusive First Look". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on 14 June 2022. Retrieved 14 June 2022.
  8. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio Puts a Fantastical Spin on a Classic Tale".
  9. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-h_VH3Spng
  10. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1488589/fullcredits?ref_=tt_cl_sm
  11. ^ https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1488589/fullcredits?ref_=tt_cl_sm
  12. ^ "Long-awaited 'Pinocchio' by Guillermo del Toro will finally become a movie at Netflix". artchive.ru. 31 October 2018. Archived from the original on 15 July 2020. Retrieved 14 July 2020.
  13. ^ Fleming, Mike Jr. (February 17, 2011). "Guillermo Del Toro Starting Stop-Motion 'Pinocchio' Feature With Henson And Pathe". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on February 23, 2021. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  14. ^ Kroll, Justin (May 17, 2012). "Del Toro to helm 'Pinocchio' for Jim Henson Co". Variety. Archived from the original on June 8, 2019. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  15. ^ Sandy Schaefer (10 May 2012). "Guillermo del Toro to Co-Direct 3D Stop-Motion 'Pinocchio' Flick". ScreenRant. Archived from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  16. ^ Trumbore, Dave (January 23, 2017). "Guillermo del Toro's Stop-Motion Movie 'Pinocchio' Adds 'Over the Garden Wall' Creator". Collider. Archived from the original on October 19, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  17. ^ Sharf, Zack (August 31, 2017). "Guillermo del Toro's 'Pinocchio' Isn't Dead Yet, But He Needs $35 Million to Make It". IndieWire. Archived from the original on February 6, 2020. Retrieved November 25, 2019.
  18. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio Movie Is 'Not Happening'". Screen Rant. November 8, 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-11-11. Retrieved November 11, 2017.
  19. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio 'as far as you can get' from Disney version, says one of film's writers - Syfy Wire". Archived from the original on 2021-05-11. Retrieved 2020-10-27.
  20. ^ Lang, Brent (October 22, 2018). "Guillermo del Toro Directing 'Pinocchio' for Netflix". Variety. Archived from the original on September 27, 2019. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  21. ^ a b "David Bradley: Nie chciałem być znany jedynie jako facet z Harry'ego Pottera [WYWIAD]". January 31, 2020. Archived from the original on January 31, 2020. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  22. ^ "Guillermo Del Toro Approached by Daniel Radcliffe, Wants Tom Waits and Christopher Walken for 'Pinocchio'". May 18, 2012. Archived from the original on July 9, 2021. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  23. ^ D’Alessandro, Anthony (August 19, 2020). "Cate Blanchett, Ewan McGregor, Tilda Swinton & More Round Out Cast For Guillermo del Toro Netflix 'Pinocchio' Movie". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  24. ^ Lambertucci, Constanza (November 24, 2022). "Dentro del taller de animación donde 'Pinocho' cobró vida en México". El País. Retrieved November 28, 2022.
  25. ^ Radish, Christina (August 23, 2012). "Screenwriter/Composer Nick Cave Talks LAWLESS, Transitioning into Screenwriting, Guillermo del Toro's PINOCCHIO, THE THREEPENNY OPERA, and More". Collider. Archived from the original on July 14, 2020. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  26. ^ Trumbore, Dave (November 6, 2018). "Netflix Sets Guillermo del Toro's 'Pinocchio' and Henry Selick's 'Wendell & Wild' for 2021". Collider. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved October 19, 2019.
  27. ^ De Wit, Alex (January 14, 2021). "Netflix Unveils 2021 Animated Film Slate, Including Sony Pictures Animation's 'Wish Dragon' And Two Aardman Specials". Cartoon Brew. Archived from the original on April 29, 2021. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  28. ^ Mancuso, Vinnie (December 1, 2021). "Exclusive: Guillermo del Toro Offers Update on His 'Frankenstein'-Inspired 'Pinocchio', Reveals Release Window". Collider. Archived from the original on December 2, 2021. Retrieved December 2, 2021.
  29. ^ Sharf, Zack (January 24, 2022). "Guillermo del Toro's 'Pinocchio' Debuts First Stop-Motion Footage, Netflix Sets December Release". Variety. Archived from the original on March 1, 2022. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  30. ^ Szalai, Georg (August 31, 2022). "Guillermo Del Toro's 'Pinocchio' to Get London Film Festival World Premiere". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 31, 2022. Retrieved August 31, 2022.
  31. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio at BFI London Film Festival". Archived from the original on 2022-09-01. Retrieved 2022-09-01.
  32. ^ "AFI Fest Adds 'Bardo', 'The Son', 'She Said', 'Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio', More to Red Carpet Lineup". 20 September 2022.
  33. ^ "'Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio' Teaser Trailer Drops". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 2022-07-28. Retrieved 2022-07-28.
  34. ^ Netflix [@netflix] (November 9, 2022). "People are sometimes afraid of things they don't know… Academy Award® winning filmmaker Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio is now playing in select theaters and on Netflix December 9" (Tweet). Retrieved November 10, 2022 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ "Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio". TIFF.net. November 2, 2022. Retrieved November 2, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  36. ^ Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio A Timeless Tale Told Anew By Gina McIntrye Foreword by Guillermo del Toro
  37. ^ "Pinocchio". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved November 23, 2022.
  38. ^ "Pinocchio". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Retrieved November 21, 2022.
  39. ^ Anderson, Erik (November 17, 2022). "Rihanna, Billy Eichner, Elvis, Guillermo del Toro's Pinocchio top Hollywood Music in Media Awards (HMMA) winners". AwardsWatch. Archived from the original on November 18, 2022. Retrieved November 18, 2022.

External links[edit]