Vote.org

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

Vote.org, formerly Long Distance Voter, is a United States-based, nonpartisan[1] 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that provides online voter guides for every state, including voter registration forms, absentee ballot applications, and information on deadlines, directions, and ID and residency requirements.[2]

History[edit]

Vote.org was founded as Long Distance Voter (LDV) in January 2008 by a group of professional investigators and voter advocates who sought to provide greater access to absentee voting information online.[3][4]

In April 2016, funded by Y Combinator, Long Distance Voter relaunched as Vote.org with funding with the explicit goal of reaching 100% voter turnout nationally.[5][4][6][7] In Fall 2016, Vote.org worked with Hustle to run a nationwide SMS peer-to-peer voter registration program in which they sent 3.8 million text messages to nearly 2.8 million low-propensity voters in the final two weeks, including over 980K on election day alone. A quantitative evaluation of this program found that polling location texting significantly both outperformed "make a plan" texting and a no-text control condition by 0.2%.[8]

In March 2018, Vote.org initiated a campaign (now branded as electionday.org) pushing companies to allow their employees time off to vote on Election Day.[5][9] As of 2020, over 1000 companies had opted to participate.[10]

In the summer of 2019, the organization's board terminated founder and CEO Debra Cleaver, citing "differences in opinion." Cleaver was replaced with former Vote.org board member Andrea Hailey. This move that proved contentious to donors and partners[11] - donor commitments up to $4 million were withdrawn upon Cleaver’s termination, and scuttled partnerships include ViacomCBS, the Voter Participation Center, and the League of Conservation Voters Education Fund.[11] Cleaver has since founded VoteAmerica, a voter mobilization project that focused on increasing turnout among unlikely voters, especially by mail-in votes, during the 2020 general election.[12] CEO Andrea Hailey has secured new partnerships with organizations like the NAACP Youth and College Division,[13] the Transformative Justice Coalition,[14] the Black Church Action Fund,[15] GLSEN[16] and wikiHow.[17]

In June 2020, Vote.org filed suit against Maine, in partnership with two citizens and the Alliance for Retired Americans, citing its inaccessible and out-of-date voting system. Some of the most prominent issues that Vote.org flagged in Maine’s voting system were few voter registration options, a lack of prepaid postage, ballot collection hurdles, an Election Day receipt deadline, and rejection of absentee ballots that had technical defects.[18]

Vote.org's 2020 election work included a combination of digital and offline tools, including: a "Print and Mail" program sending voter forms to people without printers, terrestrial radio ads, digital partnerships with influencers, informational billboards, texts combatting disinformation, Spanish translation of existing voter mobilization tools, a WhatsApp bot, and deployment of food trucks to encourage voters to stay in line as they waited to vote.[19]

Current Work[edit]

In 2021, Vote.org urged passage of the For the People Act, a U.S. bill which aims to expand voting rights.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.vote.org/about/
  2. ^ Thorpe, JR (2017-03-07). "Debra Cleaver, Founder Of Vote.org, Is Making Women's History Now". Bustle. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  3. ^ "Long Distance Voter Goes the Distance". Teen Vogue. 2008-10-24. Archived from the original on 2018-05-11. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  4. ^ a b Vetter, Moira (2016-05-13). "What Can Non-Profit Startup Vote.org Do With Y Combinator Seed Funding In 178 Days?". Forbes.com. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  5. ^ a b Steinmetz, Katy (2018-03-12). "Should Employers Give You Election Day Off? These Companies Think So". Time. Archived from the original on 2018-05-11. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  6. ^ "Vote.org is a non-profit that wants to get the U.S. to 100% voter turnout". Y Combinator. 2016-05-17. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  7. ^ Fitts, Alexis Sobel (2016-11-06). "This Y Combinator-backed company wants to redesign the voting process for the digital age". Business Insider. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  8. ^ "VOTE.org + Hustle: Voter Registration GOTV peer-to-peer texting - The Shorty Awards". shortyawards.com. Retrieved 2021-03-25.
  9. ^ von Bernuth, Lauren (2018-05-08). "Companies are Signing Up to 'Party Down For Democracy' & Make Election Day a Holiday". Citizen Truth. Retrieved 2018-05-11.
  10. ^ "Electionday.org | Participating Companies". ELECTIONDAY.ORG. Retrieved 2021-03-25.
  11. ^ a b Schleifer, Theodore (2020-04-28). "How one of America's most important voting rights groups plunged into chaos just before it was needed most". Vox Media. Retrieved 2020-05-29.
  12. ^ "Vote.org founder launches VoteAmerica, a nonprofit using tech tools to help Americans vote by mail". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2021-03-25.
  13. ^ "Vote.org Partners With The NAACP To Fight Voter Suppression In The Era Of COVID-19". BET.com. Retrieved 2020-06-13.
  14. ^ "Vote.org Announces Partnership with NAACP Youth and College Division, Transformative Justice Coalition, Legal Defense Fund, and Indigenous Communities". finance.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2020-06-13.
  15. ^ Turner, Mariel (2020-05-29). "Black Church PAC, Vote.org launch digital vote-by-mail campaign for Black faith voters". TheGrio. Retrieved 2020-06-13.
  16. ^ "Break the Silence: Your Vote, Your Voice – Voter Registration Campaign". GLSEN. Retrieved 2020-06-13.
  17. ^ "How to Vote in a Primary Election". wikiHow. Retrieved 2020-06-13.
  18. ^ https://www.popsugar.com/news/voteorg-is-suing-maine-47631286
  19. ^ "Vote.org breaks voting records across the United States in 2020 - Vote.org". vote.org. Retrieved 2021-03-25.
  20. ^ "What is the For the People Act? - Vote.org". vote.org. Retrieved 2021-03-25.

External links[edit]