Wildest Dreams (Taylor Swift song)

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

"Wildest Dreams"
Cover artwork of "Wildest Dreams", a black and white photo of Swift sitting
Single by Taylor Swift
from the album 1989
ReleasedAugust 31, 2015 (2015-08-31)
Studio
Genre
Length3:40
LabelBig Machine
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Max Martin
  • Shellback
Taylor Swift singles chronology
"Bad Blood"
(2015)
"Wildest Dreams"
(2015)
"Out of the Woods"
(2016)
Music video
"Wildest Dreams" on YouTube

"Wildest Dreams" is a song by the American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift; it is the fifth single from her fifth studio album, 1989 (2014). Swift wrote the song with its producers Max Martin and Shellback. "Wildest Dreams" has an atmospheric balladic production incorporating programmed drums, Mellotron-generated and live strings, and synthesizers; the rhythm interpolates Swift's heartbeat. Critics described it as synth-pop, dream pop, and electropop. The lyrics feature Swift pleading with a lover to remember her even after their relationship ends. Big Machine in partnership with Republic Records released "Wildest Dreams" to radio on August 31, 2015.

When the song was first released, some critics found the production and Swift's vocals alluring but others found the track derivative, comparing it to the music of Lana Del Rey. Retrospectively, critics have described "Wildest Dreams" one of Swift's most memorable songs. The single peaked within the top five on charts of Australia, Canada, Poland, and South Africa. It was certified eight-times platinum in Australia and platinum in Canada, Portugal, and the United Kingdom. In the United States, "Wildest Dreams" peaked at number five and became 1989's fifth consecutive top-ten single on the Billboard Hot 100; it peaked atop three of Billboard's airplay charts. The Recording Industry Association of America certified the track four-times platinum.

Joseph Kahn directed the music video for "Wildest Dreams". Set in 1950s Africa, it depicts Swift as a classical Hollywood actress who falls in love with her co-star but ends the fling upon completion of their film project. Media publications praised the production as cinematic but accused the video of glorifying colonialism, a claim that Kahn dismissed. Swift included "Wildest Dreams" in the set lists for two of her world tours, the 1989 World Tour (2015) and the Eras Tour (2023–2024). Following the dispute regarding the ownership of Swift's masters in 2019 and the viral popularity of "Wildest Dreams" on the social media site TikTok in 2021, Swift released the re-recorded version "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)".

Background and production[edit]

Taylor Swift had identified as a country musician until her fourth studio album, Red, which was released on October 22, 2012.[1] Red's eclectic pop and rock styles beyond the country stylings of Swift's past albums led to critics questioning her country-music identity.[2][3] Swift began writing songs for her fifth studio album in mid-2013 while touring.[4] She was inspired by 1980s synth-pop to create her fifth studio album, 1989, which she described as her first "official pop album" and named after her birth year.[5][6] The album makes extensive use of synthesizers, programmed drum machines, and electronic and dance stylings, a stark contrast to the acoustic arrangements of her country-styled albums.[7][8]

Swift and Max Martin served as executive producers of 1989.[9] On the album's standard edition, Martin and his frequent collaborator Shellback produced 7 out of 13 songs, including "Wildest Dreams".[10] Swift wrote "Wildest Dreams" with Martin and Shellback, who both produced and programmed the song and played the keyboards. Martin played the piano, and Shellback played the electric guitar and percussion.[10] Mattias Bylund joined the production of "Wildest Dreams" after Martin played the track to him; Bylund played and arranged the strings, which he recorded and edited at his home studio in Tuve, Sweden.[9] Michael Ilbert and Sam Holland, assisted by Cory Bice, recorded the track at MXM Studios in Stockholm and Conway Recording Studios in Los Angeles. It was mixed by Serban Ghenea at MixStar Studios in Virginia Beach and mastered by Tom Coyne at Sterling Sound in New York.[10]

Music and lyrics[edit]

"Wildest Dreams" is a power ballad that interpolates Swift's heartbeat in its rhythm.[10][11] It incorporates programmed drums, pulsing synths, and staccato strings generated with a Mellotron.[9][12][13] In the chorus, the melody is accentuated by live strings with what Bylund described as "Coldplay-type rhythm chords".[9] Swift sings with breathy vocals.[12][14][15] According to Jon Caramanica from The New York Times, she sings "drowsily" in the verses and "skips up an octave" in the bridge.[16] Jem Aswad of Billboard said that she "[flits] between a fluttery soprano and deadpan alto".[17] Music critics characterized the genre as synth-pop,[18][19] dream pop,[11] and electropop,[20] with elements of chillwave.[21] Although the synths and drums were a stark contrast to Swift's earlier music, the musicologist James E. Perone said that the composition retained some elements from her previous country songs: the "heavy use" of the pentatonic scale in the melody and the move between major and minor chords in the chorus.[13]

In the lyrics, Swift's character tells a lover to remember her after their relationship ends while still being in love with him.[15][22] The first verse is about lust: "He's so tall, and handsome as hell/ He's so bad, but he does it so well/ I can see the end as it begins."[23][24] She expresses her desire to live on in the lover's memory as a woman with red lips, "standing in a nice dress, staring at the sunset".[25][26] She cautions the lover that she will haunt him: "Say you'll see me again even if it's just in your wildest dreams."[27] The bridge is set in double time and sees Swift's character affirming, "You see me in hindsight/ Tangled up with you all night/ Burnin' it down."[28][29]

Critics have described the sound as sultry, sensual, and dramatic, comparing the production and the theme of failed romance to the music of the singer-songwriter Lana Del Rey.[14][26][30][31][32] The Guardian's Alexis Petridis felt that the song abandoned Swift's previous "persona of the pathetic female appendage snivelling over her bad-boy boyfriend" and instead portrayed the man as her victim.[22] Slate's Forrest Wickman thought that Swift's character was a "sort of [...] femme fatale".[27] Robert Leedham of Drowned in Sound wrote that the lyrics portrayed her arrogance and confidence to "[move] onto better things", contrasting with the victim mentality on her past songs.[32]

Release and commercial performance[edit]

Big Machine Records released 1989 on October 27, 2014; "Wildest Dreams" is number nine on the standard edition's track listing.[10][33] It debuted at number 76 on the US Billboard Hot 100 in November 2014.[34] On August 5, 2015, Swift shared on Twitter that "Wildest Dreams" would be the fifth single from 1989, following four Hot 100 top-10 singles: "Shake It Off", "Blank Space", "Style", and "Bad Blood".[35] In the United States, Big Machine and Republic Records released "Wildest Dreams" to hot adult contemporary radio on August 31,[36] and contemporary hit radio on September 1, 2015.[37] Big Machine released a remix by R3hab for download via the iTunes Store on October 15,[38] and Universal Music released the original version to Italian radio on October 30.[39]

On the Billboard Hot 100, "Wildest Dreams" re-entered at number 15 on the chart dated September 19, 2015, after its single release.[40] It reached number 10 on October 10, 2015, and became 1989's fifth consecutive top-10 single.[41] In the Billboard issue dated November 7, 2015, the single peaked at number five on the Hot 100 and became 1989's fifth consecutive number-one hit on two Billboard's airplay charts: Pop Songs and Adult Pop Songs; 1989 tied with Katy Perry's Teenage Dream (2010) to become the album with the most Adult Pop Songs number ones.[42] On Billboard's Dance/Mix Show Airplay chart, supported by the R3hab remix, "Wildest Dreams" was Swift's first number one and made her the first female artist to have five top-10 songs in a calendar year.[43] "Wildest Dreams" was certified four-times platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and had sold two million digital copies in the United States by November 2017.[44]

"Wildest Dreams" reached the top 10 on the singles charts of Canada (4),[45] South Africa (5),[46] Venezuela (6),[47] Iceland (8),[48] New Zealand (8),[49] Slovakia (8),[50] and Scotland (9).[51] It received platinum certifications in Canada,[52] Denmark,[53] Portugal,[54] and the United Kingdom.[55] The track also received gold certifications in New Zealand,[56] Germany,[57] Italy,[58] and Norway.[59] In Australia, the single peaked at number three on the singles chart[60] and was certified eight-times platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA).[61]

Critical reception[edit]

When it was first released, "Wildest Dreams" received mixed reviews from music critics. Petridis found it "hugely cheering" that Swift employed a new perspective in her songwriting.[22] Caramanica said that the song had the "most pronounced vocal tweak" on 1989, demonstrating Swift's new ways of expressing herself in music.[16] The Arizona Republic's Ed Masley found the track "haunting" and Swift's vocals "seductive".[20] Sam Lansky of Time described the production as "lush" and full of "cinematic grandeur".[23] Writing for Hot Press, Paul Nolan picked it as the album's best track for its combination of chillwave and "sweeping, singalong choruses".[21] The song helped Swift win the Songwriter of the Year Award at the 2016 BMI Pop Awards[62] and was recognized at the 2017 ASCAP Awards.[63]

Other reviews opined that the track was influenced by Lana Del Rey to an extent that it erased Swift's authenticity.[64] Aswad said that it was "hard to tell if the song is homage or parody",[17] and Wickman and Mikael Wood of the Los Angeles Times opined that Swift's songwriting lost its distinctive quality.[12][27] Shane Kimberline from MusicOMH and Lindsay Zoladz from Vulture deemed "Wildest Dreams" one of the album's weakest tracks and took issue with the Del Rey resemblance in Swift's vocals and lyrics.[14][65] Slant Magazine's Annie Galvin said Swift's vocals complemented the narrative lyrics but described the song as a "misguided imitation" of Del Rey with a predictable storyline.[24] In The Atlantic, Kevin O'Keeffe argued that the Del Rey comparisons were "unfair", and Emma Green praised the storytelling lyrics and contended that they were "unabashed, all-consuming, earnest nostalgia, anticipating", which she deemed distinct from Del Rey's "performative, cool-girl nostalgia".[15]

Retrospectively, Rob Sheffield of Rolling Stone wrote in 2019 that the song "sounds stronger and stronger over the years".[66] NME's Hannah Mylrae called it a "beauty",[18] and Nate Jones from Vulture considered it one of Swift's 10 best songs and specifically lauded the "invigorating double-time bridge".[28] The bridge was ranked 66th on Billboard's 2021 list of the 100 Greatest Song Bridges of the 21st Century.[29] Alex Hudson and Megan LaPierre of Exclaim! included "Wildest Dreams" in their list of the best 20 songs by Swift, saying that she "totally nails" the Del Rey resemblance.[67] Jane Song from Paste lauded the "dark Lana Del Rey-esque pop" production and opined that the lyrics about memory made the song have "more staying power than you'd expect".[68] Petridis ranked it 18th out of 44 singles Swift had released by April 2019, and he said that the song employed a Del Rey-inspired songwriting trope with a "smart, pleasing twist".[69]

Music video[edit]

Development and synopsis[edit]

Joseph Kahn directed the music video for "Wildest Dreams",[70] the third time he directed a music video for a 1989 single after "Blank Space" and "Bad Blood".[71] Filming primarily took place in Botswana and South Africa. Inspired by The Secret Conversations (2013), a memoir of the actress Ava Gardner,[72][73] Swift conceived the premise for the video as an illicit love affair between two actors in an isolated place within Africa, because they could only interact with each other without other means of communication.[74] Kahn took inspiration from romantic films set in Africa, such as The African Queen (1951), Out of Africa (1985), and The English Patient (1996).[75]

The video's narrative focuses on an affair between a classical Hollywood actress (Swift) and her male co-star (Scott Eastwood) who shoot a film in 1950s Africa.[76][77] Kahn compared the affair to the romance between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.[75] The pair gets involved romantically off-screen, as the video features shots of wildlife such as giraffes, zebras, and lions in a broad savanna.[78] The affair turns sour after a fight on set.[77] As the romance ends, the pair is seen shooting in front of a savanna backdrop in a California studio.[76] At the film's premiere, Swift's character sees her co-star with another woman. During the screening, Swift's character flees the theater and gets into a waiting limousine, as the co-star runs into the street and watches her leave.[79]

Release and reception[edit]

The video premiered on television during the pre-show of the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards on August 31.[80] Swift donated all of the proceeds from the video to the African Parks Foundation of America for wild animal conservation causes.[74] Rolling Stone's Brittany Spanos commented that Swift and Eastwood channeled "retro Hollywood glamour",[81] and Billboard's Natalie Weiner deemed Elizabeth Taylor an influence on Swift's fashion in the video.[82] ABC News described the video as visually powerful,[83] and Wickman found the production cinematic and the narrative "a lot more engaging" than the music video for "Style".[84] Mike Wass of Idolator said that although Swift and Eastwood did not have a strong "chemistry", the African scenery and narrative "all [hang] together rather nicely".[85] The video was nominated for Best Fresh Video at the 2016 MTV Italian Music Awards.[86]

Many online blogs and publications contended that the video glorified "white colonialism" by featuring a white cast in Africa.[87] Critics opined that it portrayed a romanticized nostalgia for colonial Africa held by white people and neglected the struggles of the African peoples during the European colonization.[88][89][90] The African studies professor Matthew Carotenuto wrote that the storyline depicted "pith-helmet-and-khaki-clad men as civilizing heroes and the women who joined them roughing it in tents wearing lingerie".[91] In the book Mistaking Africa, the history and political science authors Curtis Keim and Carolyn Somerville wrote that "Wildest Dreams" reinforced the stereotypes associated with Africa and "the mistaken perception held by many Americans that large game are found everywhere in Africa and that all parts of Africa are identical".[92] Kahn defended the video and said that featuring a black cast would be historically inaccurate for the 1950s settings.[93] Lauretta Charlton of Vulture felt that the accusations were overblown: although she acknowledged that the video's depiction of Africa was problematic, she regarded it as "antiquated" and recommended the audience to focus on the "modern-day colonialism of Africa" that demanded urgent attention.[94]

Some journalists and academics analyzed the video in the context of Swift's celebrity and the historical Hollywood depictions of Africa. Carotenuto opined that Swift was part of a "Lion King generation", which led her to think of Africa as "nothing more than a rich tapestry of flora and fauna, with actual Africans fading onto the periphery", an idea that had been propagated by Hollywood films and popular American culture.[91] The Atlantic's Spencer Kornhaber wrote that her generation was when "certain symbols of white dominance [...] have been glorified". For Kornhaber, "Wildest Dreams" was in line with Swift's artistic vision of "a powerful but vague nostalgia, defined less by time period than by particular strains of influence that just happen to be affiliated with a certain skin color".[25] Kornhaber and Tshepo Mokoena from The Guardian argued that the criticism was not meant to portray Swift as racist. The former contended that it was a "lesson" for Swift about "how nostalgia can be inherently political";[25] the latter said that the video was a "clumsy move, but not one that merits outrage", but the criticism blemished Swift's "America's sweetheart" reputation.[90]

Live performances[edit]

Swift in a rhinestoned blue dress onstage
Swift performed "Wildest Dreams" on the Eras Tour.

On the 1989 World Tour (2015), Swift performed the song as part of a mashup with "Enchanted", from her 2010 album Speak Now.[95] Playing a sparkling grand piano, she first sang "Wildest Dreams" and, after the second chorus, proceeded with "Enchanted". The rendition built up with accompanying synths and backing vocals.[96][97] She finished the mashup by changing costumes from a sparkling tulle skirt to a bodysuit for the next number.[97] The Ringer's Nora Princiotti in March 2023 deemed it Swift's best live performance, praising it as an "epic five-and-a-half-minute medley [that] is fundamentally simple".[97]

"Wildest Dreams" was included in Swift's other concerts. On September 30, 2015, she performed a stripped-down rendition on an electric guitar as part of the "Taylor Swift Experience" exhibition at the Grammy Museum at L.A. Live.[98] At a private concert for 100 fans in Hamilton Island, Australia, as part of Nova's "Red Room" series, Swift "Wildest Dreams" on an acoustic guitar.[99] Swift included the "Wildest Dreams"/"Enchanted" mashup in the set lists of two concerts: at the United States Grand Prix in Austin on October 22, 2016,[100] and at the Super Saturday Night, a pre-Super Bowl event, on February 4, 2017.[101]

Swift performed "Wildest Dreams" as a "surprise song" outside the regular set list twice on her Reputation Stadium Tour in 2018: at the first show in Santa Clara, California, on May 11, and at the second show in Tokyo, Japan, on November 21.[102] At the Philadelphia concert of the Reputation Stadium Tour on July 14, she sang "Wildest Dreams" a cappella after a stage device malfunctioned.[103] On the Eras Tour (2023–2024), a tour that Swift described as a tribute to all of her albums, she performed the song as part of the 1989 act as the screen projected scenes of a couple in bed.[104]

Ryan Adams cover[edit]

The singer-songwriter Ryan Adams released his track-by-track cover album of 1989 on September 21, 2015.[105] Adams said that Swift's 1989 helped him cope with emotional hardships and that he wanted to sing the songs from his perspective "like it was Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska".[106] Before the album's release, Adams previewed his cover of "Wildest Dreams" online in August.[107] He switches and adjusts pronouns in some places; the lyric "Standing in a nice dress" becomes "Standing in your nice dress".[108] His version combines country rock, alternative country, and jangle pop.[109][110][111] It uses acoustic instruments of live drums and guitar strums.[112][113][114]

Adams's "Wildest Dreams" peaked at number 40 on Billboard's Hot Rock & Alternative Songs chart.[115] Kornharber found the cover "undeniably lovely",[116] Jeremy Winograd of Slant Magazine deemed it a tasteful incorporation of 1980s rock,[110] and Marc Burrows of Drowned in Sound preferred Adams's cover to Swift's version.[109] Sarah Murphy in Exclaim! labeled the cover "an equally impressive feat" that could resonate with Swift's fans who lamented her departure from country music.[111] In The Guardian, Michael Cragg said that there were no substantial additions in Adams's cover, which he described as a "fairly rudimentary strumalong",[114] and Rachel Aroesti found it "comical" that it failed to match the original.[117] Caramanica said that the lyrical alterations brought "no real effect".[118]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits are adapted from liner notes of 1989.[10]

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Certifications for "Wildest Dreams"
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[61] 8× Platinum 560,000
Brazil (Pro-Música Brasil)[161] 3× Platinum 180,000
Canada (Music Canada)[52] Platinum 80,000*
Denmark (IFPI Danmark)[53] Platinum 90,000
Germany (BVMI)[57] Gold 200,000
Italy (FIMI)[58] Gold 50,000
New Zealand (RMNZ)[56] Gold 7,500*
Norway (IFPI Norway)[59] Gold 30,000
Portugal (AFP)[54] Platinum 20,000
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[162] Platinum 60,000
United Kingdom (BPI)[55] 2× Platinum 1,200,000
United States (RIAA)[163] 4× Platinum 4,000,000

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

Release history[edit]

Release dates and formats for "Wildest Dreams"
Region Date Format(s) Label(s) Ref.
United States August 31, 2015 Adult contemporary radio [36]
September 1, 2015 Contemporary hit radio [37]
Various October 15, 2015
(R3hab remix)
Big Machine [38]
Italy October 30, 2015 Radio airplay Universal [39]

"Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)"[edit]

"Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)"
Taylor Swift standing under the sunlight, looking to her left, wearing sunglasses and a horizontally stripped T-shirt.
Promotional single by Taylor Swift
from the album 1989 (Taylor's Version)
ReleasedSeptember 17, 2021 (2021-09-17)
StudioKitty Committee (London)
GenreSynth-pop
Length3:40
LabelRepublic
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
Audio video
"Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" on YouTube

Swift departed from Big Machine and signed a new contract with Republic Records in 2018. She began re-recording her first six studio albums in November 2020.[164] The decision followed a 2019 dispute between Swift and the talent manager Scooter Braun, who acquired Big Machine Records, over the masters of Swift's albums that the label had released.[165][166] By re-recording the albums, Swift had full ownership of the new masters, which enabled her to encourage licensing of her re-recorded songs for commercial use in hopes of substituting the Big Machine-owned masters.[167] She denoted the re-recordings with a "Taylor's Version" subtitle.[168]

The re-recording of "Wildest Dreams" is titled "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". Its snippets were featured in the March–May trailers for the 2021 animated film Spirit Untamed by DreamWorks Animation.[169][170][171] On September 17, 2021, Swift released "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" onto digital and streaming platforms. The release followed the viral success of the original song on the video-sharing platform TikTok, which lead to an increase in streams.[172][173] "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" is included as part of 1989 (Taylor's Version), the re-recorded version of 1989, which was released on October 27, 2023.[174]

Production and reception[edit]

"Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" is a synth-pop song that replicates the original's production.[19][173][175] Swift produced the song with Shellback and Christopher Rowe, a Nashville-based vocal engineer who had produced her re-recorded album Fearless (Taylor's Version).[176] Although Martin did not return as producer, the musicians were those from Swift's backing band during the 1989 sessions.[19] Aroesti remarked that the re-recorded version was almost identical to the original but was "sometimes bassier".[177] Robin Murray of Clash said that it contained "subtle stylist[ic] shifts",[178] and Stereogum's Tom Breihan found it more "muted".[19] Mary Siroky of Consequence appreciated that the production took "great care to capture the sound of the original, right down to a riff in the second chorus".[175] Murray and Siroky praised Swift's vocals as having improved.[175][178]

Within four hours, "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" amassed over two million streams on Spotify, surpassing the original version's biggest single-day streaming tally on the platform.[179] In the United States, it debuted at number 37 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending September 23, 2021.[180] In both Ireland and the United Kingdom, "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" surpassed the peak positions of the original version (15–39 and 25–40).[181][182] After 1989 (Taylor's Version) was released, "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" peaked at number 19 on the Billboard Global 200[146] and re-entered and peaked at number 19 on the Hot 100 chart dated November 11, 2023.[138][183] The song reached the top 10 in Malaysia (10) and Singapore (5).[184][185] It peaked in the top 40 in Australia (14),[186] the Philippines (15),[187] Canada (18),[45] Hungary (29),[188] and New Zealand (30).[189] It was certified double platinum in Australia,[190] gold in New Zealand and Greece,[191][192] and silver in the United Kingdom.[193]

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits are adapted from Tidal.[194]

Charts[edit]

Weekly chart performance for "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)"
Chart (2021–2023) Peak

position

Australia (ARIA)[186] 14
Canada (Canadian Hot 100)[45] 18
Canada AC (Billboard)[122] 33
Euro Digital Song Sales (Billboard)[195] 10
France (SNEP)[196] 182
Global 200 (Billboard)[146] 19
Greece International (IFPI)[192] 39
Hungary (Single Top 40)[188] 29
Ireland (IRMA)[197] 15
Lithuania (AGATA)[198] 88
Malaysia (RIM)[184] 10
Netherlands (Single Top 100)[199] 69
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[189] 30
Philippines (Billboard)[187] 15
Singapore (RIAS)[185] 5
South Africa (RISA)[200] 63
Sweden (Sverigetopplistan)[201] 95
UK Singles (OCC)[202] 25
US Billboard Hot 100[138] 19
US Adult Contemporary[139] 23
Vietnam (Vietnam Hot 100)[203] 80

Certifications[edit]

Certifications for "Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)"
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[190] 2× Platinum 140,000
New Zealand (RMNZ)[191] Gold 15,000
United Kingdom (BPI)[193] Gold 400,000
Streaming
Greece (IFPI Greece)[192] Gold 1,000,000

Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.
Streaming-only figures based on certification alone.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Caulfield, Keith (October 30, 2012). "Taylor Swift's Red Sells 1.21 Million; Biggest Sales Week for an Album Since 2002". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  2. ^ McNutt 2020, p. 77.
  3. ^ Light, Alan (December 5, 2014). "Billboard Woman of the Year Taylor Swift on Writing Her Own Rules, Not Becoming a Cliche and the Hurdle of Going Pop". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 26, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  4. ^ Talbott, Chris (October 13, 2013). "Taylor Swift Talks Next Album, CMAs and Ed Sheeran". Associated Press. Archived from the original on October 26, 2013. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  5. ^ Eells, Josh (September 16, 2014). "Taylor Swift Reveals Five Things to Expect on 1989". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on November 16, 2018. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  6. ^ Sisario, Ben (November 5, 2014). "Sales of Taylor Swift's 1989 Intensify Streaming Debate". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 11, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  7. ^ Pettifer, Amy (November 27, 2014). "Reviews: Taylor Swift, 1989". The Quietus. Retrieved June 21, 2023.
  8. ^ Perone 2017, p. 55–56.
  9. ^ a b c d Zollo, Paul (February 13, 2016). "The Oral History of Taylor Swift's 1989". The Recording Academy. Archived from the original on April 4, 2016. Retrieved March 23, 2016 – via Cuepoint.
  10. ^ a b c d e f 1989 (Compact disc liner notes). Taylor Swift. Big Machine Records. 2014. BMRBD0500A.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  11. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – 'Wildest Dreams' (video) (Singles Going Steady)". PopMatters. September 1, 2015. Archived from the original on December 28, 2017. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  12. ^ a b c Wood, Mikael (October 27, 2014). "Taylor Swift Smooths Out the Wrinkles on Sleek 1989". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 15, 2014. Retrieved November 15, 2020.
  13. ^ a b Perone 2017, p. 62.
  14. ^ a b c Kimberlin, Shane (November 3, 2014). "Taylor Swift – 1989 | Album Review". MusicOMH. Archived from the original on November 5, 2014. Retrieved February 5, 2019.
  15. ^ a b c Cruz, Lenika; Beck, Julie; Green, Emma; O'Keeffe, Kevin (October 25, 2014). "Taylor Swift's 1989: First Impressions". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on June 24, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  16. ^ a b Caramanica, Jon (October 23, 2014). "A Farewell to Twang". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 11, 2014. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  17. ^ a b Aswad, Jem (October 24, 2014). "Album Review: Taylor Swift's Pop Curveball Pays Off With 1989". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 8, 2017. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  18. ^ a b Mylrea, Hannah (September 8, 2020). "Every Taylor Swift Song Ranked In Order of Greatness". NME. Archived from the original on September 8, 2020. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ a b c d Breihan, Tom (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift Shares Her Re-Recorded Version of 'Wildest Dreams': Listen". Stereogum. Archived from the original on May 6, 2022. Retrieved May 6, 2022.
  20. ^ a b Masley, Ed (August 12, 2015). "30 Best Taylor Swift Singles Ever (So Far)". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  21. ^ a b Nolan, Paul (November 13, 2014). "Taylor Swift 1989 – Album Review". Hot Press. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  22. ^ a b c Petridis, Alexis (October 24, 2014). "Taylor Swift: 1989 Review – Leagues Ahead of the Teen-Pop Competition". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 1, 2014. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  23. ^ a b Lansky, Sam (October 23, 2014). "Review: 1989 Marks a Paradigm Swift". Time. Archived from the original on November 1, 2014. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  24. ^ a b Galvin, Annie (October 27, 2014). "Review: Taylor Swift, 1989". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved October 28, 2014.
  25. ^ a b c Kornhaber, Spencer (September 2, 2015). "The Backlash to Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' Shows the Danger of Nostalgia". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on December 28, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  26. ^ a b Cliff, Aimee (October 30, 2014). "1989". Fact. Archived from the original on June 18, 2020. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  27. ^ a b c Wickman, Forrest (October 24, 2014). "Taylor Swift's 1989: A Track-by-Track Breakdown". Slate. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  28. ^ a b Jones, Nate (August 13, 2020). "Taylor Swift Songs, Ranked from Worst to Best". Vulture. Archived from the original on December 7, 2023. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  29. ^ a b "The 100 Greatest Song Bridges of the 21st Century: Staff Picks". Billboard. May 13, 2021. Archived from the original on February 28, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  30. ^ Eakin, Marah (October 28, 2014). "With 1989, Taylor Swift Finally Grows Up". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on May 20, 2017. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  31. ^ Zoladz, Lindsay (October 24, 2014). "Did Taylor Swift Rip Off Lorde and Lana Del Rey?". Vulture. Archived from the original on December 28, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  32. ^ a b Leedham, Robert (October 27, 2014). "Album Review: Taylor Swift - 1989". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  33. ^ Graff, Gary (October 24, 2014). "Taylor Swift to the Haters: 'If You're Upset That I'm Just Being Myself, I'm Going to Be Myself More'". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 2, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  34. ^ Trust, Gary (November 5, 2014). "Taylor Swift's 'Shake It Off' Returns to No. 1 on Hot 100". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 7, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2014.
  35. ^ Caulfield, Keith (August 5, 2015). "Taylor Swift Announces Next Single". Billboard. Archived from the original on April 15, 2021. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  36. ^ a b "Hot/Modern/AC Future Releases". All Access Media Group. Archived from the original on August 24, 2015. Retrieved September 1, 2015.
  37. ^ a b "Top 40/M Future Releases". All Access Media Group. Archived from the original on August 24, 2015. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  38. ^ a b "Wildest Dreams (R3hab Remix) – Single by Taylor Swift". iTunes Store. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  39. ^ a b "Taylor Swift 'Wildest Dreams'" (in Italian). Airplay Control S.R.L. Archived from the original on June 25, 2022. Retrieved June 24, 2022.
  40. ^ Trust, Gary (September 8, 2015). "The Weeknd Doubles Up in Hot 100's Top Three". Billboard. Archived from the original on September 10, 2015. Retrieved September 9, 2015.
  41. ^ Trust, Gary (September 28, 2015). "The Weeknd Holds Atop Hot 100, Taylor Swift Hits Top 10 With 'Wildest Dreams'". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 1, 2015. Retrieved December 1, 2015.
  42. ^ Trust, Gary (October 26, 2015). "The Weeknd Tops Hot 100; Adele No. 1 Next Week?". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 1, 2015. Retrieved December 1, 2015.
  43. ^ Trust, Gary (November 24, 2015). "Taylor Swift Tallies First Dance/Mix Show Airplay No. 1 With 'Wildest Dreams'". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 26, 2015. Retrieved November 24, 2015.
  44. ^ Trust, Gary (November 26, 2017). "Ask Billboard: Taylor Swift's Career Album & Song Sales". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved November 25, 2018.
  45. ^ a b c d "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canadian Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  46. ^ a b "EMA Top 10 Airplay: Week Ending 2015-10-06". Entertainment Monitoring Africa. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  47. ^ a b "Record Report – Rock General" (in Spanish). Record Report. Archived from the original on October 30, 2015. Retrieved October 31, 2015.
  48. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History". RÚV. April 11, 2016. Archived from the original on September 3, 2017. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  49. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  50. ^ a b "ČNS IFPI" (in Slovak). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiálna. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: insert 20161 into search. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  51. ^ a b "Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 18, 2015.
  52. ^ a b "Canadian single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Music Canada. Retrieved October 2, 2015.
  53. ^ a b "Danish single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved April 24, 2024.
  54. ^ a b "Portuguese single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (PDF) (in Portuguese). Associação Fonográfica Portuguesa. Retrieved January 31, 2023.
  55. ^ a b "British single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved February 23, 2024.
  56. ^ a b "New Zealand single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved October 2, 2015.
  57. ^ a b "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Taylor Swift; 'Wildest Dreams')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved November 18, 2022.
  58. ^ a b "Italian single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved September 12, 2023.
  59. ^ a b "Norwegian single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in Norwegian). IFPI Norway. Retrieved November 27, 2020.
  60. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved September 19, 2015.
  61. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2023 Singles" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  62. ^ "BMI Honors Taylor Swift and Legendary Songwriting Duo Mann & Weil at the 64th Annual BMI Pop Awards". Broadcast Music, Inc. May 11, 2016. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2016.
  63. ^ "ASCAP Pop Awards 2017". American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Archived from the original on June 23, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  64. ^ Manning, Craig (October 31, 2014). "Taylor Swift – 1989 – Album Review". AbsolutePunk. Archived from the original on October 29, 2014. Retrieved August 30, 2015.
  65. ^ Zoladz, Lindsay (October 27, 2014). "Taylor Swift's 1989 Is Her Most Conservative Album Yet". Vulture. Archived from the original on January 10, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  66. ^ Sheffield, Rob (December 12, 2019). "'Wildest Dreams' (2014)". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 24, 2021. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  67. ^ Hudson, Alex; LaPierre, Megan (October 20, 2022). "Taylor Swift's 20 Best Songs Ranked". Exclaim!. Archived from the original on December 6, 2022. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  68. ^ Song, Jane (February 11, 2020). "All 158 Taylor Swift Songs, Ranked". Paste. Archived from the original on June 25, 2023. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  69. ^ Petridis, Alexis (April 26, 2019). "Taylor Swift's Singles – Ranked!". The Guardian. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved December 28, 2023.
  70. ^ Dyer 2016, p. 301.
  71. ^ Fisher, Lauren Alexis (August 31, 2015). "Watch Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' Video". Harper's Bazaar. Retrieved January 8, 2024.
  72. ^ Klosterman, Chuck (October 15, 2015). "Taylor Swift on 'Bad Blood', Kanye West, and How People Interpret Her Lyrics". GQ. Archived from the original on October 18, 2015. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  73. ^ Mondello, Bob (July 20, 2013). "You'll Want To Hang Up On These Secret Conversations". NPR. Archived from the original on January 12, 2021. Retrieved November 25, 2020.
  74. ^ a b Dyer 2016, p. 307.
  75. ^ a b Silver, Marc (September 2, 2015). "Director of Taylor Swift's New Video Defends His Work". NPR. Archived from the original on September 4, 2015. Retrieved September 3, 2015.
  76. ^ a b Dyer 2016, p. 308.
  77. ^ a b Linder, Emilee (August 30, 2015). "Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' Video Is Here To Make You Cry". MTV. Archived from the original on August 31, 2015. Retrieved September 1, 2015.
  78. ^ Dyer 2016, p. 308; Keim & Somerville 2021, p. 149.
  79. ^ Meynes, Carolyn (August 30, 2015). "Taylor Swift 'Wildest Dreams' Music Video: Scott Eastwood and 1989 Star Fall In Love". Music Times. Archived from the original on September 8, 2015. Retrieved December 14, 2023.
  80. ^ Hosken, Patrick (August 23, 2015). "Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' Will Premiere During the VMA Pre-Show". MTV News. Archived from the original on August 26, 2015. Retrieved September 4, 2015.
  81. ^ Spanos, Brittany (August 30, 2015). "Watch Taylor Swift's Glamorous, Retro 'Wildest Dreams' Video". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 2, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  82. ^ Weiner, Natalie (August 31, 2015). "Taylor Swift Debuts 'Wildest Dreams' Video at 2015 VMAs: Watch". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 14, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2023.
  83. ^ "MTV VMAs: Taylor Swift Debuts 'Wildest Dreams' Video". ABC News. August 31, 2015. Archived from the original on December 14, 2023. Retrieved December 14, 2023.
  84. ^ Wickman, Forrest (August 30, 2015). "Watch Taylor Swift Go Classical Hollywood With the Video for 'Wildest Dreams'". Slate. Archived from the original on September 2, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  85. ^ Wass, Mike (August 30, 2015). "Taylor Swift And Scott Eastwood Pay Tribute To Cinema's Greatest Love Stories In 'Wildest Dreams': Watch". Idolator. Archived from the original on September 4, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  86. ^ "TRL Awards 2016" (in Italian). MTV Italy. Archived from the original on June 22, 2016. Retrieved June 19, 2016.
  87. ^ Khomami, Nadia (September 2, 2015). "Taylor Swift Accused of Racism In 'African Colonial Fantasy' Video". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  88. ^ Rutabingwa, Viviane; Kassaga Arinaitwe, James (September 1, 2015). "Taylor Swift Is Dreaming of a Very White Africa". NPR. Archived from the original on September 2, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  89. ^ Duca, Lauren (August 30, 2015). "Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' Channels White Colonialism". HuffPost. Archived from the original on September 1, 2015. Retrieved September 2, 2015.
  90. ^ a b Mokoena, Tshepo (September 2, 2015). "Is Taylor Swift's Colonial Fantasy the Beginning of the End?". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  91. ^ a b Carotenuto, Matthew (September 23, 2015). "Taylor Swift's White Colonial Romance". JSTOR. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  92. ^ Keim & Somerville 2021, p. 149.
  93. ^ "Taylor Swift Video Director Defends 'Wildest Dreams' Following 'Whitewash' Claims". The Guardian. September 3, 2015. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  94. ^ Charlton, Lauretta (September 4, 2015). "Take a Breath – the 'Wildest Dreams' Video Isn't Racist – Now Exhale". Vulture. Archived from the original on August 5, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  95. ^ Wood, Lucy (May 6, 2015). "Taylor Swift Has Kicked Off Her 1989 World Tour in Tokyo". Cosmopolitan. Archived from the original on June 14, 2018. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  96. ^ Allen, Paige (July 25, 2015). "Review: Taylor Swift Delivers Another Stellar Show at Gillette". The Sun Chronicle. Archived from the original on May 31, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  97. ^ a b c Princiotti, Nora (March 16, 2023). "On the Eve of Eras, Ranking Taylor Swift's All-Time Best Live Performances". The Ringer. Archived from the original on March 31, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  98. ^ "Taylor Swift Shares Stunning 'Wildest Dreams' Performance from Grammy Museum". Billboard. January 4, 2016. Archived from the original on November 29, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  99. ^ Akers, Trenton; Arnold, Rikki-Lee (December 4, 2015). "Taylor Swift 1989 Tour: Exclusive Picture as Taylor Swift Arrives In Brisbane Ahead of Concert". The Courier-Mail. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  100. ^ Hall, David Brendan (October 23, 2016). "Taylor Swift Delivers a Knockout Performance at Formula 1 Concert in Austin". Billboard. Archived from the original on September 2, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  101. ^ Atkinson, Katie (February 5, 2017). "Taylor Swift Performs 'Better Man' & 'I Don't Wanna Live Forever' for First Time at Stunning Pre-Super Bowl Set". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 25, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  102. ^ Iasimone, Ashley (November 20, 2018). "All the Surprise Songs Taylor Swift Has Performed On Her Reputation Stadium Tour B-Stage (So Far)". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 8, 2019. Retrieved December 19, 2018.
  103. ^ Fisher, Luchina (July 16, 2018). "Taylor Swift Turns a Concert Malfunction Into a Memorable Moment". Good Morning America. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  104. ^ Yahr, Emily (March 18, 2023). "Taylor Swift's Eras Tour Opener: A Complete Recap of All 44 Songs". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2023.
  105. ^ Jones, Nate (September 17, 2015). "Ryan Adams Is Finally Releasing His 1989 Covers Album; Listen to His 'Bad Blood'". Vulture. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  106. ^ Browne, David (September 21, 2015). "Ryan Adams on His Full-Album Cover of Taylor Swift's 1989". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 25, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  107. ^ Goodman, Jessica (August 13, 2015). "Ryan Adams Tackles Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams' in Latest 1989 Cover". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  108. ^ Caffrey, Dam (September 28, 2015). "Ryan Adams – 1989". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on October 28, 2020. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  109. ^ a b Burrows, Marc (October 30, 2015). "Album Review: Ryan Adams - 1989". Drowned in Sound. Archived from the original on December 29, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  110. ^ a b Winograd, Jeremy (October 21, 2015). "Review: Ryan Adams, 1989". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on May 6, 2019. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  111. ^ a b Murphy, Sarah (September 22, 2015). "Ryan Adams 1989". Exclaim!. Archived from the original on November 3, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  112. ^ Wood, Mikael (September 21, 2015). "Review: Ryan Adams Turns to Taylor Swift for Help On His Version of 1989". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 23, 2015. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  113. ^ Sawdy, Evan (September 24, 2015). "Ryan Adams: 1989". PopMatters. Archived from the original on August 2, 2018. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  114. ^ a b Cragg, Michael (September 22, 2015). "Ryan Adams's Take on Taylor Swift's 1989 – First Listen Track-By-Track Review". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 28, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  115. ^ "Ryan Adams Chart History (Hot Rock & Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 13, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  116. ^ Kornharber, Spencer (September 21, 2015). "Ryan Adams's 1989 and the Vindication of Taylor Swift". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  117. ^ Aroesti, Rachel (November 5, 2015). "Ryan Adams: 1989 Review – False Notes Abound on Taylor Swift Covers Album". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 29, 2022. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  118. ^ Caramanica, Jon (September 22, 2015). "Teaming Up, Together (Drake and Future) or Apart (Ryan Adams and Taylor Swift)". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  119. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved November 18, 2015.
  120. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved October 31, 2015.
  121. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in French). Ultratip. Retrieved September 18, 2015.
  122. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada AC)". Billboard. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  123. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada CHR/Top 40)". Billboard. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  124. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canada Hot AC)". Billboard. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  125. ^ "ČNS IFPI" (in Czech). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiální. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: Change the chart to CZ – RADIO – TOP 100 and insert 201544 into search. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  126. ^ "Taylor Swift: Wildest Dreams" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  127. ^ "Taylor Swift: Wildest Dreams" (in Finnish). Musiikkituottajat. Retrieved August 4, 2016.
  128. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  129. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Greece Digital Song Sales)". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 6, 2019. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  130. ^ "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Single (track) Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved September 10, 2015.
  131. ^ "Irish-charts.com – Discography Taylor Swift". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  132. ^ "The official lebanese Top 20 – Taylor Swift". The Official Lebanese Top 20. Archived from the original on September 17, 2016. Retrieved September 1, 2016.
  133. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Mexico Airplay)". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 19, 2019. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  134. ^ "Tipparade-lijst van week 42, 2015" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Archived from the original on March 19, 2023. Retrieved March 19, 2023.
  135. ^ "Listy bestsellerów, wyróżnienia :: Związek Producentów Audio-Video". Polish Airplay Top 100. Retrieved December 28, 2015.
  136. ^ "SloTop50 – Slovenian official singles chart". slotop50.si. Archived from the original on July 18, 2018. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  137. ^ "Taylor Swift: Artist Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved October 23, 2015.
  138. ^ a b c "Taylor Swift Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  139. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  140. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Adult Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  141. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Dance Mix/Show Airplay)". Billboard. Retrieved November 3, 2015.
  142. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved October 27, 2015.
  143. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Rhythmic)". Billboard. Retrieved November 3, 2015.
  144. ^ "ČNS IFPI" (in Czech). Hitparáda – Digital Top 100 Oficiální. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: Change the chart to CZ – SINGLES DIGITAL – TOP 100 and insert 202139 into search. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  145. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in German). GfK Entertainment charts. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  146. ^ a b c "Taylor Swift Chart History (Global 200)". Billboard. Retrieved December 13, 2023.
  147. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". AFP Top 100 Singles. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  148. ^ "ČNS IFPI". IFPI ČR. Note: Select SK SINGLES DIGITAL TOP 100 and insert 202139 into search. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  149. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Singles Top 100. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  150. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  151. ^ "ARIA Charts – End of Year Charts – Top 100 Singles 2015". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on January 24, 2016. Retrieved January 6, 2016.
  152. ^ "Canadian Hot 100 Year End 2015". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on December 11, 2015. Retrieved December 11, 2015.
  153. ^ "Hot 100: Year End 2015". Billboard. Archived from the original on December 21, 2015. Retrieved December 9, 2015.
  154. ^ "Adult Contemporary Songs – Year-End 2015". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on November 6, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  155. ^ "Adult Pop Songs – Year-End 2015". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  156. ^ "Pop Songs: Year-End 2015". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  157. ^ "Canadian Hot 100 Year End 2016". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on December 21, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2016.
  158. ^ "Hot 100 Songs – Year-End 2016". Billboard. Archived from the original on January 26, 2017. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  159. ^ "Adult Contemporary Songs: Year-End 2016". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved December 18, 2016.
  160. ^ "Adult Pop Songs: Year-End 2016". Billboard. January 2, 2013. Archived from the original on December 22, 2016. Retrieved December 18, 2016.
  161. ^ "Brazilian single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams" (in Portuguese). Pro-Música Brasil. Retrieved March 21, 2024.
  162. ^ "Spanish single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". El portal de Música. Productores de Música de España. Retrieved April 1, 2024.
  163. ^ "American single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  164. ^ Melas, Chloe (November 16, 2020). "Taylor Swift Speaks Out About Sale of Her Masters". CNN. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved November 19, 2020.
  165. ^ "Taylor Swift Wants to Re-Record Her Old Hits". BBC News. August 22, 2019. Archived from the original on August 22, 2019. Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  166. ^ Finnis, Alex (November 17, 2020). "Taylor Swift Masters: The Controversy around Scooter Braun Selling the Rights to Her Old Music Explained". i. Archived from the original on February 12, 2021. Retrieved February 13, 2021.
  167. ^ Shah, Neil (April 9, 2021). "Taylor Swift Releases New Fearless Album, Reclaiming Her Back Catalog". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved September 25, 2022.
  168. ^ Espada, Mariah (July 6, 2023). "Taylor Swift Is Halfway Through Her Rerecording Project. It's Paid Off Big Time". Time. Archived from the original on October 27, 2023. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  169. ^ Fernández, Alexia (March 12, 2021). "Spirit Untamed First Look! Hear Taylor Swift's Re-Recorded 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' in Trailer". People. Archived from the original on March 12, 2021. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  170. ^ Moore, Sam (April 1, 2021). "Listen to a New Preview of Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)'". NME. Archived from the original on August 11, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  171. ^ Kenneally, Cerys (May 17, 2021). "Extended Clip of 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' Features in New Spirit Untamed Trailer". The Line of Best Fit. Archived from the original on November 28, 2021. Retrieved May 17, 2021.
  172. ^ Speakman, Kimberlee (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift Drops New Version Of 'Wildest Dreams'—Why It Matters". Forbes. Archived from the original on August 10, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  173. ^ a b Legatspi, Althea (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift Surprise-Releases 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' for Avid TikTokers". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on November 14, 2021. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  174. ^ Vassell, Nicole (October 27, 2023). "Taylor Swift Fans Celebrate As Pop Star Releases 1989 (Taylor's Version)". The Independent. Archived from the original on October 30, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  175. ^ a b c Siroky, Mary (September 17, 2021). "Song of the Week: Taylor Swift Revives Our 'Wildest Dreams' with Surprise Re-Recording". Consequence. Archived from the original on May 6, 2022. Retrieved May 6, 2022.
  176. ^ Willman, Chris (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift Releases New Version of 'Wildest Dreams' From 1989, Skipping Ahead in Her Re-Recordings". Variety. Archived from the original on November 4, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  177. ^ Aroesti, Rachel (October 27, 2023). "Taylor Swift: 1989 (Taylor's Version) Review – Subtle Bonus Tracks Add New Depths to a Classic". The Guardian. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  178. ^ a b Murray, Robin (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift Just Shared 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)'". Clash. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  179. ^ Willman, Chris (September 17, 2021). "Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' Quickly Beats the Original Song's Spotify Record for Single-Day Plays". Variety. Archived from the original on September 17, 2021. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  180. ^ Zeliner, Xander (September 27, 2021). "Taylor Swift's 'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' Debuts in Hot 100's Top 40". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 14, 2021. Retrieved September 28, 2021.
  181. ^ White, Jack (September 24, 2021). "Ed Sheeran's 'Shivers' Holds Firm At Irish Number 1". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on September 24, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  182. ^ Copsey, Rob (September 24, 2021). "Ed Sheeran's 'Shivers' Scores Second Week at Official Singles Chart Summit". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on September 24, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  183. ^ Zellner, Xander (November 6, 2023). "Taylor Swift Charts All 21 Songs From 1989 (Taylor's Version) on the Hot 100". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 6, 2023. Retrieved December 29, 2023.
  184. ^ a b "Top 20 Most Streamed International + Domestic Songs Week 38 (17/09/2021-23/09/2021)". Recording Industry Association of Malaysia. October 2, 2021. Archived from the original on February 7, 2023. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  185. ^ a b "RIAS Top Charts Week 38 (17–23 September 2021)". Recording Industry Association Singapore. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 29, 2021.
  186. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  187. ^ a b "Taylor Swift Chart History (Philippines Songs)". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 17, 2022. Retrieved November 7, 2023.
  188. ^ a b "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Single (track) Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved September 30, 2021.
  189. ^ a b "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  190. ^ a b "Jan 2024 Single Accreds" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved February 14, 2024.
  191. ^ a b "New Zealand single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  192. ^ a b c "Digital Singles Chart (International)". IFPI Greece. Archived from the original on November 13, 2023. Retrieved November 8, 2023.
  193. ^ a b "British single certifications – Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved January 8, 2024.
  194. ^ "'Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)' – Credits". Tidal. Archived from the original on April 18, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  195. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Euro Digital Song Sales)". Billboard. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  196. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)" (in French). Les classement single. Retrieved November 16, 2023.
  197. ^ "Official Irish Singles Chart Top 50". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  198. ^ "2021 39-os savaitės klausomiausi (Top 100)" (in Lithuanian). AGATA. October 1, 2021. Archived from the original on October 1, 2021. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  199. ^ "Dutch Single Top 100". Hung Medien. Archived from the original on November 8, 2023. Retrieved November 8, 2023.
  200. ^ "Local & International Streaming Chart Top 100: Week 38". Recording Industry of South Africa. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved October 1, 2021.
  201. ^ "Taylor Swift – Wildest Dreams (Taylor's Version)". Singles Top 100. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  202. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  203. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Billboard Vietnam Hot 100)". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 6, 2022. Retrieved November 11, 2023.

Sources[edit]