Commodore Amiga MIDI Driver

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Commodore Amiga MIDI Driver (CAMD) is a shared library for AmigaOS which provides a general device driver for MIDI data, so that applications can share MIDI data with each other in real-time, and interface to MIDI hardware in a device-independent way.

History[edit]

Commodore announced work on Commodore Amiga MIDI driver (CAMD) during the National Association of Music Merchants January 1990 trade show. Driver should allow multiple MIDI applications to work together in the Amiga multitasking environment, with timing as a crucial issue (working with realtime data streams). ARexx support was also planned.[1] The software was originally created at the Carnegie Mellon University and later adopted by Commodore.[2] According to software developer Daniel S. Riley, several people worked on the driver (starting with Roger B. Dannenberg and Jean-Christophe Dhellemmes at the Carnegie-Mellon university). Commodore finally gave this task to David Joiner (author of Deluxe Music) and synchronisation services were separated in realtime.library.[3] Deluxe Music 2.0 introduced support for both camd.library and realtime.library[4] and was for many years the only commercial music package using CAMD. Amiga Format article about MIDI noticed in 1999 still many bugs, some compatibility issues and lack of application support.[2]

Commodore's version of CAMD also included a built-in driver for the Amiga serial port. The Poseidon USB stack contains the camdusbmidi.class.

AROS port and later development[edit]

In part due to above mentioned problems, the CAMD library was rewritten (reverse engineered by Kjetil S. Matheussen) as part of the AROS project in 2001[5] and later in 2005 ported to AmigaOS 4.[6] In 2012, Lyle Hazelwood released updated AmigaOS 4 version,[7] which was then distributed as part of AmigaOS starting with the 4.1 Update 5.[8] Since MorphOS 3.10 CAMD is officially part of this system.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Krutz, Jamie (July 1990). "Amiga Headed for Musical Nirvana". INFO. No. 31. INFO Publications. p. 61. ISSN 0897-5868.
  2. ^ a b Goodwin, Simon (March 1999). "Rombler MIDI, CAMD Software". Amiga Format. No. 121. Future Publishing. p. 57. ISSN 0957-4867.
  3. ^ Riley, Daniel S. (12 February 1993). "Re: camd.library? (was Re: DMCS Upgrade)". Newsgroupcomp.sys.amiga.audio. Usenet: 1lgkqrINNd9q@lns596.TN.CORNELL.EDU. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  4. ^ Rutter, Daniel (January 1994). "Deluxe Music 2, MIDI Support". Australian Commodore and Amiga Review. Vol. 11, no. 1. Saturday Magazine. p. 30. ISSN 1034-3806.
  5. ^ "Midi: camd.library V40, CamdBnp-Tools". Amiga-News.de. 22 July 2001. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  6. ^ "AmigaOS 4: CAMD- und emu10kx-MIDI-Treiber" (in German). Amiga-News.de. 17 April 2005. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  7. ^ "AmigaOS 4: Several MIDI-libraries and tools". Amiga-News.de. 12 June 2012. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  8. ^ "AmigaOS 4.1 Update 5 published". Amiga-News.de. 16 August 2012. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  9. ^ https://www.morphos-team.net/releasenotes/3.10 MorphOS 3.10 Disk Changes

External links[edit]