American Music Award for Favorite Country Song

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American Music Awards for Favorite Country Song
CountryUnited States
Presented byAmerican Music Awards
First awarded1974
Last awarded2020
Currently held byDan + Shay & Justin Bieber – "10,000 Hours"
Most awardsKenny Rogers (5)
Most nominationsKenny Rogers (6)
Websitetheamas.com

The American Music Award for Favorite Song – Country (formerly known as Favorite Country Single 1974-1995) has been awarded since 1974. The category was retired for over a decade in 1995, before returning in the 2016 ceremony. Years reflect the year in which the awards were presented, for works released in the previous year (until 2003 onward when awards were handed out in November of the same year). The all-time winner for this category is Kenny Rogers with 5 wins, he is also the most nominated artist with 6 nominations.

Winners and nominees[edit]

1970s[edit]

Year Artist Song Ref
1974
(1st)
Charlie Rich "Behind Closed Doors" [1]
Conway Twitty "You've Never Been This Far Before"
Kris Kristofferson "Why Me"
1975
(2nd)
Charlie Rich "The Most Beautiful Girl" [2]
Merle Haggard "If We Make It Through December"
Charley Pride "Mississippi Cotton Picking Delta Town"
1976
(3rd)
Glen Campbell "Rhinestone Cowboy" [3]
Freddy Fender "Before the Next Teardrop Falls"
Willie Nelson "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain"
1977
(4th)
Willie Nelson "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" [4]
Loretta Lynn "Somebody Somewhere (Don't Know What He's Missin' Tonight)"
C. W. McCall "Convoy"
1978
(5th)
Kenny Rogers "Lucille" [5]
Glen Campbell "Southern Nights"
Loretta Lynn "She's Got You"
1979
(6th)
Linda Ronstadt "Blue Bayou" [6]
Dolly Parton "Here You Come Again"
Johnny Paycheck "Take This Job and Shove It"

1980s[edit]

Year Artist Song Ref
1980
(7th)
Barbara Mandrell "Sleeping Single in a Double Bed" [7]
Waylon Jennings "Amanda"
Eddie Rabbitt "Suspicions"
1981
(8th)
Kenny Rogers "Coward of the County" [8]
Crystal Gayle "If You Ever Change Your Mind"
Kenny Rogers and Kim Carnes "Don't Fall in Love with a Dreamer"
1982
(9th)
Anne Murray "Could I Have This Dance" [9]
Willie Nelson "On the Road Again"
Alabama "Feels So Right"
Ronnie Milsap "(There's) No Gettin' Over Me"
1983
(10th)
Kenny Rogers "Love Will Turn You Around" [10]
The Oak Ridge Boys "Bobbie Sue"
Sylvia "Nobody"
1984
(11th)
Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton "Islands in the Stream" [11]
Alabama "Dixieland Delight"
John Anderson "Swingin'"
The Oak Ridge Boys "Love Song"
1985
(12th)
Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton "Islands in the Stream" [12]
The Judds "Mama He's Crazy"
Anne Murray "A Little Good News"
1986
(13th)
Willie Nelson "Forgiving You Was Easy" [13]
Alabama "There's No Way"
Lee Greenwood "Dixie Road"
1987
(14th)
The Judds "Grandpa (Tell Me 'Bout the Good Ol' Days)" [14]
Dan Seals "Everything That Glitters (Is Not Gold)"
Randy Travis "Diggin' Up Bones"
Steve Wariner "You Can Dream of Me"
1988
(15th)
Randy Travis "Forever and Ever, Amen" [15]
George Strait "Ocean Front Property"
Hank Williams, Jr. "Born to Boogie"
1989
(16th)
Randy Travis "I Told You So" [16]
Alabama "Fallin' Again"
Kathy Mattea "Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses"

1990s[edit]

Year Artist Song Ref
1990
(17th)
Randy Travis "Deeper Than the Holler" [17]
Alabama "If I Had You"
George Strait "Baby's Gotten Good at Goodbye"
1991
(18th)
Garth Brooks "If Tomorrow Never Comes" [18]
The Judds "Born to Be Blue"
George Strait "Love Without End, Amen"
1992
(19th)
Garth Brooks "The Thunder Rolls" [19]
Travis Tritt "Here's a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)"
Trisha Yearwood "She's in Love with the Boy"
1993
(20th)
Billy Ray Cyrus "Achy Breaky Heart" [20]
Garth Brooks "The River"
Vince Gill "I Still Believe in You"
1994
(21st)
Alan Jackson "Chattahoochee" [21]
Clint Black and Wynonna Judd "A Bad Goodbye"
Dolly Parton and Friends "Romeo"
1995
(22nd)
Vince Gill "Whenever You Come Around" [22]
Tim McGraw "Indian Outlaw"
John Michael Montgomery "I Swear"

2010s[edit]

Year Artist Song Ref
2016
(44th)
Tim McGraw "Humble and Kind" [23]
Florida Georgia Line "H.O.L.Y."
Thomas Rhett "Die a Happy Man"
2017
(45th)
Keith Urban "Blue Ain't Your Color" [24]
Sam Hunt "Body Like a Back Road"
Jon Pardi "Dirt On My Boots"
2018
(46th)
Kane Brown "Heaven" [25]
Bebe Rexha featuring Florida Georgia Line "Meant to Be"
Dan + Shay "Tequila"
2019
(47th)
Dan + Shay "Speechless" [26]
Luke Combs "Beautiful Crazy"
Blake Shelton "God's Country"

2020s[edit]

Year Artist Song Ref
2020
(48th)
Dan + Shay and Justin Bieber "10,000 Hours" [27]
Maren Morris "The Bones"
Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani "Nobody but You"

Category facts[edit]

Multiple wins[edit]

Multiple nominations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1974 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  2. ^ "1975 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  3. ^ "1976 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  4. ^ "1977 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  5. ^ "1978 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  6. ^ "1979 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  7. ^ "1980 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  8. ^ "1981 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  9. ^ "1982 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  10. ^ "1983 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  11. ^ "1984 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  12. ^ "1985 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  13. ^ "1986 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  14. ^ "1987 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  15. ^ "1988 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  16. ^ "1989 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  17. ^ "A Fountain of Youth at the American Music Awards". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. January 24, 1990. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  18. ^ "M. C. Hammer, Rap Win Big at American Music Awards". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. January 29, 1991. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  19. ^ "1992 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  20. ^ "Jackson Wins 3 American Music Awards". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. January 26, 1993. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  21. ^ "1994 American Music Awards Winners". Awards and Winners. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  22. ^ "Boyz II Men Tops American Music Awards". The Christian Science Monitor. February 1, 1995. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  23. ^ McIntyre, Hugh (November 20, 2016). "American Music Awards 2016: Full List of Winners". Forbes. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  24. ^ "Here Are All the Winners From the 2017 AMAs". Billboard. November 19, 2017. Retrieved November 21, 2017.
  25. ^ Nordyke, Kimberly (October 9, 2018). "American Music Awards: Taylor Swift Wins Artist of the Year, Sets New Record". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  26. ^ Aniftos, Rania (October 24, 2019). "Post Malone, Ariana Grande & Billie Eilish Lead 2019 American Music Awards Nominations: See Full List". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 24, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  27. ^ Shafer, Ellise (November 22, 2020). "American Music Awards 2020: The Full Winners List". Variety. Retrieved November 26, 2020.