Milwaukee Admirals

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Milwaukee Admirals
CityMilwaukee, Wisconsin
LeagueAmerican Hockey League
ConferenceWestern
DivisionCentral
Founded1970 (As an amateur team)
Home arenaUW–Milwaukee Panther Arena
Colors       
Owner(s)Group headed by
Harris Turer
General managerScott Nichol
Head coachKarl Taylor
CaptainKevin Gravel
MediaWVTV-DT2 "My 24"
The Big 920
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
AHL.TV (Internet)
AffiliatesNashville Predators (NHL)
Atlanta Gladiators (ECHL)
Franchise history
1970Milwaukee Wings
1970–presentMilwaukee Admirals
Championships
Regular season titles2 AHL (2003–04, 2019–20)
Division titles1 USHL (1976–77)
4 IHL (1982–83, 1992–93, 1994–95, 1995–96)
7 AHL (2003–04, 2005–06, 2008–09, 2010–11, 2015–16, 2019–20, 2023–24)
Conference titles2 (2003–04),(2005–06)
Calder Cups1 (2003–04)
Playoff championships1 USHL title (1975–76)
Current season

The Milwaukee Admirals are a professional ice hockey team in the American Hockey League (AHL). They play in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States, at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Panther Arena. They are the highest level affiliate of the NHL's Nashville Predators.[1]

The team has been playing since 1970, originally as an amateur team called the Milwaukee Wings, but were renamed as the Admirals after their first season. They played an independent schedule until joining the semiprofessional United States Hockey League (USHL) in 1973. In 1977, the Admirals joined the International Hockey League (IHL) when the USHL transitioned to a junior league. When the IHL ceased operations in 2001, the Admirals joined the AHL.

History[edit]

Independent era[edit]

The Admirals first took to the ice in the winter of 1970 as an amateur club known as the Milwaukee Wings. Sponsored by the Wisconsin Citizens Benefit Association, they lost their first game on January 25 when the Madison All-Stars beat them 17–7.[2][3] They got their first win five days later when they defeated the Milwaukee Winter Club 10–8.[4] They finished the season with 8 wins and 7 loses.[5]

The next year the team was sold by the original owner Reed Fansher to a group of investors. One of the investors, Erwin J. Merar, owned an appliance store and the team was renamed the "Admirals" after a brand of household appliances sold in Merar's store.[6]

United States Hockey League era[edit]

Beginning with the 197374 season the Admirals joined the United States Hockey League. Their first season in a league was not particularly successful as they ended the season in last place in their division. They won only 11 games, lost 35, and tied two games that season.[citation needed]

The Admirals won the USHL league championship in 1976, winning seven straight games in the league's playoffs. In the off-season, the team was purchased by former Chicago Blackhawks announcer Lloyd Pettit and his wife, Jane Bradley Pettit.[citation needed]

International Hockey League era[edit]

For the 197778 season the Admirals joined the International Hockey League as the USHL was becoming a strictly amateur league. The Admirals appeared in the IHL's Turner Cup finals only once (1983), where they lost to Toledo in six games.[citation needed]

American Hockey League era[edit]

The Admirals, along with five other IHL franchises, joined the American Hockey League for the 200102[7] season when the IHL ceased operations. The team was allowed to keep their nickname despite the presence of the Norfolk Admirals in the AHL, as Milwaukee had used the nickname since 1970, well before the Norfolk team was established as the Hampton Roads Admirals in the ECHL. (In the 2015–16 season, that AHL franchise moved to the AHL's Pacific Division as the fourth incarnation of the San Diego Gulls, and a Norfolk club was re-established in the ECHL.)

2003-04 Admirals with the Calder Cup

They won their first Calder Cup in 2004 when they defeated the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins. Prior to the finals, Milwaukee needed seven games to defeat the Cincinnati Mighty Ducks in the first round. Then the Admirals defeated the Chicago Wolves in six games to advance to the conference finals. The Admirals then eliminated the Rochester Americans four games to one. Milwaukee went on to sweep the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins to win the Calder Cup. The Admirals completed a rare postseason run in which they needed one fewer game to eliminate their opponents in each subsequent series.[8]

The Admirals were purchased in June 2005 by a group of investors, led by Harris J. Turer, including Milwaukee Brewers owner Mark Attanasio, assistant general manager Gord Ash, and pitcher Ben Sheets. The Brewers subsequently became the sole uniform sponsor of the Admirals, and the Admirals wear a Brewers logo patch on their sweaters.[citation needed]

The Admirals won their second division title as a member of the American Hockey League in 2006, clinching the title on the last day of their schedule with a win over the Grand Rapids Griffins.[9]

In the 2006 Calder Cup playoffs after narrowly winning a seven-game playoff series over the Iowa Stars, Milwaukee swept both the Houston Aeros and Grand Rapids Griffins to advance to their second Calder Cup final series. To their disappointment, the Admirals would lose in six games to the Hershey Bears.[10]

On August 1, 2006, the Admirals unveiled a new logo and a change in color scheme from the traditional red-and-blue to black, white, and light blue.[11] They used this logo until 2015, when the Admirals unveiled another new logo, keeping the Lake Michigan blue from 2006, but replaced black with navy blue. Also, the skeleton motif was kept with the hat that adorns the skeleton's head as a callback to the Admirals logos used from 1976 to 1997.[12] This logo received very positive reviews, resulting in it becoming SportsLogos.net's 2015 Best New Primary Logo of the Year.[13]

On March 16, 2016, Milwaukee Admirals owner/CEO Harris Turer along with Wisconsin Center District (WCD) announced that the Admirals signed a 10-year contract, bringing the Admirals to the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Panther Arena for the 2016-17 AHL season.[14] This 10-year contract also results in a $6.4 million investment to bring the arena up to AHL standards with the Admirals contributing two million and the rest being supplied by the Wisconsin Center District.[15]

Milwaukee hosting the Rockford IceHogs in 2023

The team won its second regular season championship in the 2019–20 season, which was curtailed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to the ongoing restrictions during the pandemic, the Admirals were one of three teams that opted out of the 2020–21 AHL season.[16] After the Admirals announced their season was cancelled, team ownership also announced that all of their full-time employees would still be paid for the year.

On November 17, 2023, the Admirals made history when defenseman Luke Prokop made his AHL debut as the first openly gay player in the league's history.[17]

During the 2023-24 season, the Admirals set a new franchise record of 19 consecutive wins, which is also the second-longest winning streak in AHL history as of 2024. The winning streak lasted from January 5, 2024, which was also their first game of the calendar year, until February 25.

Team information[edit]

League membership[edit]

NHL affiliation[edit]

The Admirals have been the top-level affiliate of the Nashville Predators since that team's founding in 1998.[25]

"I like to say that for our players, the road to Nashville runs through Milwaukee and a look at our roster illustrates this. (T)his is the kind of environment that we want our prospects to develop in."

— Nashville General Manager David Poile

Coincidentally, the two cities' baseball franchises share a reverse affiliation, as the Nashville Sounds are the Triple-A affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers.

During the 2006–07 season, the Admirals were also part of an unusual affiliation agreement with the Edmonton Oilers, who used five partial affiliates in the AHL for the 2006–07 season. These five affiliates included the Milwaukee Admirals, the Grand Rapids Griffins, the Iowa Stars, the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins, and the Hamilton Bulldogs. This arrangement lasted one season, as the Oilers announced a three-year affiliation with the Springfield Falcons on March 19, 2007.

Mascot[edit]

During the 1998 Admirals rebranding efforts, the Admirals created a new mascot, named Roscoe. Roscoe is a "sea dog"-like animal with bright orange fur, a hockey puck-shaped nose, and wears a bicorne admiral's hat along with an Admirals jersey with the number 98, representing the year Roscoe joined the Admirals organization.[26]

At times during breaks and intermission, Roscoe will also ride a zamboni modified to look like a pirate ship. When interacting with fans, Roscoe will sometimes take souvenir hockey pucks from fans and place them on his nose.

In 2014, when the Nashville Predators' mascot, Gnash, got injured, Roscoe was "called up" to the Predators and to the NHL, joining with other mascots to entertain fans in Nashville while Gnash recovered.[27]

Season-by-season results[edit]

Legend:  —  – round did not exist at the time

Regular season Playoffs
Season Games Won Lost Tied OTL SOL Points PCT Goals
for
Goals
against
Standing Year Qualifying 1st round
Opening Round
2nd round
Quarterfinals
3rd round
Semifinals
Finals
1970 15 8 7 0 16 .533
1970–71 22 14 7 1 29 .659
1971–72 24 11 12 1 23 .479 167 117
1972–73 32 26 5 1 53 .828 228 145
1973–74 48 11 35 2 24 .250 192 318 5th, Southern 1974 Did not qualify
1974–75 48 18 30 0 36 .375 241 288 3rd, Southern 1975 Did not qualify
1975–76 48 23 25 0 46 .479 279 270 3rd, Southern 1976 W, 2–0, SC W, 2–0, TC W, 3–0, GB
1976–77 48 23 23 2 48 .500 231 241 1st, Southern 1977 W, 2–0–2, GB L, 1–2–3, GR
1977–78 80 27 38 15 69 .431 257 299 3rd, South 1978 L, 1–4, TOL
1978–79 80 21 48 11 53 .331 260 391 4th, South 1979 L, 3–4, GRO
1979–80 80 29 41 10 68 .425 327 402 3rd, South 1980 L, 0–4, SAG
1980–81 82 32 35 15 79 .482 354 371 3rd, West 1981 L, 3–4, FWK
1981–82 82 41 34 7 91 .543 385 351 2nd, IHL 1982 L, 1–4, SAG
1982–83 82 43 30 9 98 .579 407 312 1st, West 1983 BYE W, 4–1, KAL L, 2–4, TOL
1983–84 82 46 27 6 3 101 .616 403 335 2nd, IHL 1984 BYE L, 0–4, FLI
1984–85 82 25 47 5 5 60 .366 292 389 5th, West 1985 Did not qualify
1985–86 82 48 28 1 5 102 .622 368 306 2nd, West 1986 L, 1–4, PEO
1986–87 82 41 37 2 2 86 .524 342 358 3rd, West 1987 L, 2–4, SLC
1987–88 82 21 54 0 7 49 .299 288 430 4th, West 1988 Did not qualify
1988–89 82 54 23 0 5 113 .689 399 323 2nd, West 1989 W, 4–2, KAL L, 1–4, SLC
1989–90 82 36 39 0 7 79 .482 316 370 3rd, West 1990 L, 2–4, SLC
1990–91 82 36 43 3 0 75 .457 275 316 4th, West 1991 L, 2–4, PEO
1991–92 82 38 36 5 3 84 .512 306 309 3rd, East 1992 L, 1–4, MUS
1992–93 82 49 23 3 7 108 .659 329 280 1st, Midwest 1993 L, 2–4, KC
1993–94 81 40 24 17 0 97 .599 338 302 2nd, Midwest 1994 L, 0–4, ATL
1994–95 81 44 27 0 10 98 .605 317 298 1st, Central 1995 W, 3–2, SD L, 1–4, LV
1995–96 82 40 32 10 90 .549 290 307 1st, Midwest 1996 L, 1–3, PEO
1996–97 82 38 36 8 84 .512 253 298 4th, Midwest 1997 L, 0–3, LB
1997–98 82 43 34 5 91 .555 267 262 3rd, Midwest 1998 W, 3–1, HOU L, 4–2, CHI
1998–99 82 38 28 16 92 .561 254 265 4th, Midwest 1999 L, 0–2, MTB
1999–00 82 37 36 9 83 .506 222 246 5th, Eastern 2000 L, 1–2, CLE
2000–01 82 42 33 7 91 .555 244 217 5th, Eastern 2001 Did not qualify
2001–02 80 30 35 10 5 75 .469 198 207 5th, West 2002 Did not qualify
2002–03 80 32 27 14 7 85 .531 247 251 4th, West 2003 W, 2–1, RCH L, 0–3, HOU
2003–04 80 46 24 7 3 102 .638 269 191 1st, West 2004 BYE W, 4–3, CIN W, 4–2, CHI W, 4–1, RCH W, 4–0, WBS
2004–05 80 47 24 4 5 103 .644 247 207 2nd, West 2005 L, 3–4, CIN
2005–06 80 49 21 6 4 108 .675 268 234 1st, West 2006 W, 4–3, IWA W, 4–0, HOU W, 4–0, GRG L, 2–4, HER
2006–07 80 41 25 4 10 96 .600 227 230 3rd, West 2007 L, 0–4, CHI
2007–08 80 44 29 4 3 95 .594 231 212 4th, West 2008 L, 2–4, CHI
2008–09 80 49 22 3 6 107 .669 229 195 1st, West 2009 W, 4–0, RCK L, 3–4, HOU
2009–10 80 41 30 2 7 91 .569 237 220 4th, West 2010 L, 3–4, CHI
2010–11 80 44 22 6 8 102 .638 226 194 1st, West 2011 W, 4–2, TEX L, 3–4, HOU
2011–12 76 40 29 2 5 87 .572 210 190 2nd, Midwest 2012 L, 0–3, ABB
2012–13 76 41 28 4 3 89 .586 197 200 2nd, Midwest 2013 L, 1–3, TEX
2013–14 76 39 24 6 7 91 .599 215 199 3rd, Midwest 2014 L, 0–3, TOR
2014–15 76 33 28 8 7 81 .533 206 218 5th, Midwest 2015 Did not qualify
2015–16 76 48 23 3 2 101 .664 224 193 1st, Central 2016 L, 0–3, GR
2016–17 76 43 26 4 3 95 .612 225 215 3rd, Central 2017 L, 0–3, GR
2017–18 76 38 32 4 2 82 .539 216 235 6th, Central 2018 Did not qualify
2018–19 76 36 24 14 2 88 .579 217 207 2nd, Central 2019 L, 2–3, IA
2019–20 61 41 14 5 3 90 .714 211 141 1st, Central 2020 Season cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2020–21 Did not participate due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2021–22 76 39 28 5 4 87 .572 229 228 3rd, Central 2022 BYE W, 3–2, MB L, 1–3, CHI
2022–23 72 41 24 5 2 89 .618 238 211 2nd, Central 2023 BYE W, 3–2, MB W, 3–2, TEX L, 2–4, CV
2023–24 72 47 22 2 1 97 .674 238 193 1st, Central 2024 BYE

Players[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Updated March 24, 2024.[28][29]

Team roster
No. Nat Player Pos S/G Age Acquired Birthplace Contract
70 Russia Egor Afanasyev LW R 23 2021 Tver, Russia Predators
18 Canada Wade Allison RW R 26 2024 Carman, Manitoba Predators
42 United States Anthony Angello RW R 28 2023 Albany, New York Predators
30 Russia Yaroslav Askarov G R 21 2022 Omsk, Russia Predators
29 Canada Tye Felhaber F L 25 2023 Pembroke, Ontario Admirals
8 Canada Liam Foudy C L 24 2023 Toronto, Ontario Predators
5 United States Kevin Gravel (C) D L 32 2022 Kingsford, Michigan Predators
1 United States Troy Grosenick G L 34 2023 Brookfield, Wisconsin Predators
19 United States Jordan Gross D R 29 2022 Maple Grove, Minnesota Predators
11 Canada Cody Hodgson C R 34 2024 Toronto, Ontario Admirals
25 Finland Joakim Kemell RW R 20 2023 Jyväskylä, Finland Predators
68 Canada Zach L'Heureux LW L 21 2023 Montreal, Quebec Predators
3 Canada Jake Livingstone D R 25 2023 Creston, British Columbia Predators
52 United States Griffin Luce D L 26 2023 Williamsville, New York Admirals
28 Canada Jack Matier D R 21 2023 Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario Predators
10 Canada Roland McKeown (A) D R 28 2022 Listowel, Ontario Predators
47 Canada Navrin Mutter LW L 23 2022 Lucan, Ontario Predators
16 Canada Cal O'Reilly (A) C L 37 2023 Toronto, Ontario Admirals
13 Finland Juuso Parssinen C L 23 2022 Hämeenlinna, Finland Predators
6 Canada Luke Prokop D R 22 2022 Edmonton, Alberta Predators
49 Canada Reid Schaefer LW L 20 2023 Edmonton, Alberta Predators
40 Russia Fedor Svechkov C L 21 2023 Togliatti, Russia Predators
16 Canada Philip Tomasino C R 22 2022 Mississauga, Ontario Predators
62 United States Kevin Wall RW R 24 2023 Rochester, New York Admirals
28 United States Jasper Weatherby C L 26 2023 Portland, Oregon Predators
89 Canada Ozzy Wiesblatt RW R 22 2024 Calgary, Alberta Sharks
58 Sweden Adam Wilsby D L 23 2022 Stockholm, Sweden Predators

Team captains[edit]

Retired numbers[edit]

Milwaukee Admirals retired numbers
No. Player Position Career No. retirement
9 Phil Wittliff C 1973–1977 April 3, 1977[30]
14 Fred Berry C 1980–1984, 1985–1987 December 27, 2003[31]
14 Mike McNeill C 1992–1998 December 27, 2003 [31]
20 Darren Haydar RW 2002–2006 February 21, 2020[32]
26 Tony Hrkac C 1994–1997, 2003–2005 March 14, 2008[33]
27 Danny Lecours LW 1975–1984, 1985–1986 January 4, 1987[34]
44 Kevin Willison D 1981–1984, 1985–1986 February 28, 2004[35]
44 Gino Cavallini C 1993–1996 February 28, 2004[35]

Notable NHL alumni[edit]

List of Milwaukee Admirals alumni who played more than 100 games in Milwaukee and 100 or more games in the National Hockey League.

Team records[edit]

Single season[edit]

  • Goals: Danny Lecours, 75, (1982–83)
  • Assists: Dale Yakiwchuk, 100, (1982–83)
  • Points: Dale Yakiwchuk, 138, (1982–83)
  • Penalty minutes: Don Gibson, 381, (1992–93)
  • GAA: Connor Ingram, 1.92, (2019–20)
  • SV%: Connor Ingram, .933, (2019–20)

Career[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nashville Predators renew affiliation with the Cincinnati Cyclones". Nashville Predators. June 16, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  2. ^ "Local Skaters Lose In Debut". Milwaukee Journal, via NewsBank: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Historical Newspapers. January 25, 1970. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  3. ^ "Milwaukee Teams To Meet In Milwaukee". Milwaukee Journal, via NewsBank: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Historical Newspapers. January 30, 1970. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  4. ^ "Wings Win". Milwaukee Journal, via NewsBank: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Historical Newspapers. February 1, 1970. Retrieved September 11, 2021.
  5. ^ "Admirals Open Season Sunday". Milwaukee Journal. November 8, 1970. Retrieved April 16, 2020 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.
  6. ^ Caputo, Paul (November 22, 2019). "Milwaukee Admirals celebrate refrigerators with 50th season logo". SportsLogos.net. Retrieved November 22, 2019.
  7. ^ "Milwaukee Admirals hockey team [AHL] statistics and history at hockeydb.com". HockeyDB. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  8. ^ "Calder Cup Champions - Players | AHL". American Hockey League. Archived from the original on February 27, 2010. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  9. ^ Karnosky, Jason. "Memories of Calder Cup Title Still Strong". Milwaukee Admirals. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  10. ^ "2006 AHL PLAYOFFS". American Hockey League. Retrieved October 24, 2016.
  11. ^ "Ads Unveil Bold New Look". Milwaukee Admirals. July 16, 2015. Archived from the original on July 16, 2015. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  12. ^ Creamer, Chris (July 15, 2015). "Fear This: Admirals Evolve, Unveil New Logos and Uniforms". SportsLogos.net. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  13. ^ Creamer, Chris (December 16, 2015). "2015 Logo of the Year Awards: The Best New Sports Logos of the Year". SportsLogos.net. Retrieved December 16, 2015.
  14. ^ "Admirals to move to UWM Panther Arena". American Hockey League. March 16, 2016. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  15. ^ Hess, Corrinne (May 17, 2016). "Admirals improvements beginning at UW-Milwaukee Panther Arena". Milwaukee Business News. Retrieved October 24, 2016.
  16. ^ "28 teams to participate in 2020-21 AHL season". American Hockey League. January 4, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  17. ^ "Milwaukee Admirals' Luke Prokop becomes first openly gay player to appear in AHL game". The Athletic. The New York Times. 17 November 2023. Retrieved 28 November 2023.
  18. ^ Cowan, Mike. "The History of Milwaukee Hockey". Wisconsin Hockey History. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  19. ^ "Admirals Regain Stars for Meet". Milwaukee Journal. April 2, 1972. Retrieved April 16, 2020 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.
  20. ^ Smith, Russ L. (March 25, 1974). "Waterloo takes 8-game win streak to playoffs". The Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier. Retrieved March 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Twins Split in Final Two Games". Green Bay Press-Gazette. March 24, 1975. Retrieved March 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ "6-5 Overtime Defeat Eliminates Sioux City". Sioux City Journal. March 21, 1976. Retrieved March 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "Admirals end Bays' season". Traverse City Record-Eagle. March 29, 1976. Retrieved March 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Zima, Jim (April 10, 1976). "Pominville Stops Bobcats' Title Bid". Green Bay Press-Gazette. Retrieved March 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "ADS, PREDS EXTEND AFFILIATION". Milwaukee Admirals. 4 May 2023. Retrieved 28 November 2023.
  26. ^ "The Randoms 2016: Best Milwaukee-area sports mascot (non-professional)". Milwaukee Record. November 18, 2018. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  27. ^ Angus, Maren (October 8, 2014). "Predators' mascot on injured reserve list". Tennessean. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  28. ^ "MilwaukeeAdmirals.com – Team Roster". Milwaukee Admirals. Retrieved March 24, 2024.
  29. ^ "TheAHL.com - Milwaukee Admirals Roster". Milwaukee Admirals. Retrieved March 24, 2024.
  30. ^ Karpowicz, Jerry (April 4, 1977). "Admirals Give TV Lesson". Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved September 18, 2021 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.
  31. ^ a b Dettmann, Nick (December 28, 2003). "Everything but the victory - Admirals honor greats, play to frustrating tie". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved September 18, 2021 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.
  32. ^ Sandalow, Brian (February 22, 2020). "Darren Haydar: a man with two teams". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  33. ^ "Big games on tap for Admirals". Milwaukee Admirals. March 12, 2008. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved June 14, 2019.
  34. ^ "'Mr. Admiral' receives his due". Milwaukee Journal. January 5, 1987. Retrieved September 18, 2021 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.
  35. ^ a b Gardner, Charles F. (February 26, 2004). "Center bounces between Admirals, Predators". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved September 18, 2021 – via NewsBank: Access World News – Historical and Current.

External links[edit]