SwiftOnSecurity

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

SwiftOnSecurity is a pseudonymous computer security expert and influencer on Twitter who pretends to be Taylor Swift.[1][2][3] As of September 2022, they have over 375,500 followers.[4] The name was chosen due to Taylor Swift's caution with regard to digital security.[5] The account has been cited in news articles about computer security.[6][7] They are a Microsoft MVP, and work as an endpoint monitoring lead for a Fortune 500 company.[8] Their blog contains general computer security advice, with a large amount dedicated to Windows and phishing.[9]

Atlassian[edit]

In December 2019, SwiftOnSecurity tweeted about an issue in Atlassian software that embedded the private key of a domain. This turned out to be a security vulnerability, and was assigned CVE-2019-15006.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conger, Kate (2019-09-05). "The Work Diary of Parisa Tabriz, Google's 'Security Princess'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-02-23.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ Whittaker, Zack. "When security meets sarcasm: Taylor Swift brings infosec to the masses". ZDNet. Retrieved 2020-02-23.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ Zimmerman, Jess (2015-06-18). "Parody Twitter accounts have more freedom than you and I ever will | Jess Zimmerman". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2020-02-23.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "SwiftOnSecurity (@SwiftOnSecurity) | Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 2022-12-27.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ Hern, Alex (2019-01-29). "How Taylor Swift became a cybersecurity icon". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  6. ^ "Password expiration is dead, long live your passwords". TechCrunch. 2 June 2019. Retrieved 2020-02-23.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. ^ "Google Busy Removing More Malicious Chrome Extensions from Web Store". threatpost.com. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  8. ^ "About this site". Decent Security. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  9. ^ "Decent Security". Decent Security. Retrieved 2020-02-23.
  10. ^ Thomas, Claburn. "Atlassian scrambles to fix zero-day security hole accidentally disclosed on Twitter". The Register. Retrieved 2020-02-23.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]