National Register of Historic Places listings in southern Puerto Rico

National Register entries listed below are found in the highlighted 8 municipalities of Puerto Rico.

This is a list of properties and districts in the southern municipalities of Puerto Rico that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Spanish: Registro Nacional de Lugares Históricos). It includes places along the southern coast of the island, and on the south slope of Puerto Rico's Cordillera Central.

The area covered spans from the city of Yauco on the southwest coast to the Guayama municipality at the southeast.

Names of places given are as they appear in the National Register, reflecting name as given in NRHP application at the date of listing. Note, the National Register name system does not accommodate Spanish á, ñ and other letters.


          This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted April 5, 2024.[1]

Guayama[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Carretera #4
Carretera #4
Carretera #4
October 30, 2020
(#100005741)
PR-15, from km. 0 in Guayama to km. 25.7 in Cayey
18°03′01″N 66°08′07″W / 18.0502°N 66.1352°W / 18.0502; -66.1352 (Carretera #4)
Guayama to Cayey Former spur route of the Carretera Central which provided connection across the Sierra de Cayey. Today known as Puerto Rico Highway 15.
2 Casa Cautiño
Casa Cautiño
Casa Cautiño
December 31, 1984
(#84003137)
1 N. Santiago Palmer Street[4]
17°59′09″N 66°06′48″W / 17.9859°N 66.1132°W / 17.9859; -66.1132 (Casa Cautiño)
Guayama Pueblo Built in 1887, this house is one of the best remaining examples of southern Puerto Rico's 19th-century vernacular style of urban domestic architecture, blended with extensive Neoclassical elements. Especially notable is the house's masonry, wood, and metal ornamentation. It was acquired for use as a museum in 1979.[5][4]
3 Cayey Bridge
Cayey Bridge
Cayey Bridge
July 19, 1995
(#95000845)
Highway 15, km 1, spanning Río Guamaní
17°59′59″N 66°06′46″W / 17.9997°N 66.1128°W / 17.9997; -66.1128 (Cayey Bridge)
Caimital and Palmas This 1891 iron bridge carries the nineteenth century highway between Guayama and Cayey, which was once the only link between the coastal east of Puerto Rico and the rest of the island. Its lateral lattice girder design is characteristic of Puerto Rico but rare in the United States.[6]
4 Eleuterio Derkes Grammar School
Eleuterio Derkes Grammar School
Eleuterio Derkes Grammar School
August 4, 1987
(#87001312)
José María Anguelí Street
17°58′55″N 66°06′42″W / 17.9819°N 66.1118°W / 17.9819; -66.1118 (Eleuterio Derkes Grammar School)
Guayama Pueblo Built in 1908, this school was designed during a period when schools were gaining importance as civic institutions in Puerto Rico. Its simplified Neoclassical design emphasized this shift, and it became a prototype for a generation of school construction on the island.[7]
5 Iglesia Parroquial de San Antonio de Padua de Guayama
Iglesia Parroquial de San Antonio de Padua de Guayama
Iglesia Parroquial de San Antonio de Padua de Guayama
July 30, 1976
(#76002248)
5 Ashford Street
17°59′07″N 66°06′46″W / 17.9852°N 66.1129°W / 17.9852; -66.1129 (Iglesia Parroquial de San Antonio de Padua de Guayama)
Guayama Pueblo This church was first built in the 18th century and rebuilt twice in the 19th century and its present appearance dates from 1874. It takes an overall Romanesque form, while the details exhibit the eclecticism that characterized much Puerto Rican architecture in the later 1800s.[8]
6 Ingenio Azucarero Vives
Ingenio Azucarero Vives
Ingenio Azucarero Vives
September 1, 1976
(#76002249)
Avenida Central
17°58′38″N 66°06′59″W / 17.9771°N 66.1164°W / 17.9771; -66.1164 (Ingenio Azucarero Vives)
Guayama Pueblo The Vives Sugar Mill, built c. 1828, comprises the remains of a windmill and processing building. Constructed of river rock, cut granite, and some brick, it contrasts with later industrial buildings built primarily of brick. The mill recalls an era when the sugar industry used slave labor almost exclusively, and witnessed a slave uprising in the first half of the 19th century.[9][10]

Guayanilla[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Padre Nazario School
Padre Nazario School
Padre Nazario School
November 14, 2012
(#12000936)
4 Concepción Street
18°01′08″N 66°47′25″W / 18.018757°N 66.790308°W / 18.018757; -66.790308 (Padre Nazario School)
Guayanilla Pueblo Completed in 1926, this primary school epitomizes the monumental schools built in Puerto Rico during the early 20th century. Its Neoclassical and Spanish Revival details at the entry and spatial sequence of the vestibule are exceptional design features.[11]

Juana Díaz[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Carretera Central May 2, 2019
(#100003686)
Highway 14 from Coamo boundary to Ponce boundary[a]
18°03′04″N 66°28′45″W / 18.050999°N 66.479179°W / 18.050999; -66.479179 (Carretera Central)
Río Cañas Arriba, Río Cañas Abajo, Tijeras, Juana Díaz Pueblo, Jacaguas, and Callabo Built by the Spanish administration during 1846–1886 to connect San Juan with Ponce, this was one of the first modern roadways in Puerto Rico and was regarded as one of the finest roads in the Americas for years after its completion. The listed portion of the road, from Caguas to Juana Díaz, includes the exceptionally challenging engineering through the Cordillera Central, 11 major bridges, 14 maintenance workers' houses,[b] and numerous other roadway structures.[12][13]
2 Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz[c]
Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz
Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz
December 10, 1984
(#84000465)
Town Plaza
18°03′10″N 66°30′19″W / 18.052897°N 66.505350°W / 18.052897; -66.505350 (Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz)
Juana Díaz Pueblo This Baroque church built in 1807[d] retains most of its original design, construction, and materials, including masonry walls, towers, sacristies, interior arcades, dome, and wooden spiral stairway in the south tower. The church's placement in the town plaza and close to the town hall reflect the Crown-mandated urban design principles of the early 19th century.[14][16]
3 Cueva Lucero
Cueva Lucero
Cueva Lucero
September 26, 2008
(#08000936)
Address restricted[e][17]
Guayabal This cave includes more than 100 pre-Hispanic petroglyphs and pictographs dating possibly as early as the 7th century C.E., "making it one of the best examples of aboriginal rock art in the Antilles." Most of the images are zoomorphic in nature. It has been known to archaeologists since at least the early 1900s.[18]

Peñuelas[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Daniel Webster School
Daniel Webster School
Daniel Webster School
November 14, 2012
(#12000940)
255 Luis Muñoz Rivera Street
18°03′16″N 66°43′20″W / 18.054495°N 66.722086°W / 18.054495; -66.722086 (Daniel Webster School)
Peñuelas Pueblo Designer Francisco Gardón Vega[f] employed a mixture of Beaux-Arts and Spanish Revival styles in this 1927 school, a common stylistic approach in Puerto Rico at the time. The school quickly became a centerpiece of public architecture in Peñuelas, surpassing the church and city hall, and remains important to local public identity.[19]

Ponce[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Acueducto Alfonso XII
Acueducto Alfonso XII
Acueducto Alfonso XII
December 30, 2019
(#100004854)
Calle del Acueducto
18°01′17″N 66°36′51″W / 18.021358°N 66.614251°W / 18.021358; -66.614251 (Acueducto Alfonso XII)
Portugués Urbano and Sexto This aqueduct, completed in 1878 and in service until 1928, was the key component of Ponce's first system for distribution of potable water. It exemplifies 19th century design principles, and recalls civic investments to promote the welfare of urban inhabitants. Of the aqueduct's total length of 4 kilometers (2.5 mi), about 400 meters (1,300 ft) are included in the historic listing.[20]
2 Albergue Caritativo Tricoche
Albergue Caritativo Tricoche
Albergue Caritativo Tricoche
May 14, 1987
(#87000769)
Tricoche Street
18°01′00″N 66°36′55″W / 18.016785°N 66.615193°W / 18.016785; -66.615193 (Albergue Caritativo Tricoche)
Segundo Spanish Royal Corps of Engineers-built hospital from 1878 designed in the Neoclásico Isabelino style. Part of the 19th Century Civil Architecture in Ponce NRHP thematic nomination.
3 Antiguo Cuartel Militar Español de Ponce
Antiguo Cuartel Militar Español de Ponce
Antiguo Cuartel Militar Español de Ponce
May 14, 1987
(#87000772)
End of Castillo Street
18°00′55″N 66°36′30″W / 18.015201°N 66.608439°W / 18.015201; -66.608439 (Antiguo Cuartel Militar Español de Ponce)
Quinto Spanish military headquarters in Ponce built in 1894 in the local Neoclásico Isabelino style. Its garrisoned troops participated in the 1898 Puerto Rico campaign and throughout its history it also served as a courthouse, jailhouse and today it hosts the Ponce School of Fine Arts.
4 Antiguo Hospital Militar Español de Ponce
Antiguo Hospital Militar Español de Ponce
Antiguo Hospital Militar Español de Ponce
May 14, 1987
(#87000770)
León, Atocha, and Bondad Streets
18°01′08″N 66°36′52″W / 18.019026°N 66.614432°W / 18.019026; -66.614432 (Antiguo Hospital Militar Español de Ponce)
Sexto Spanish Royal Corps of Engineers-built military hospital from 1897 designed in the local Neoclásico Isabelino style, it was the last major Spanish building to be constructed in the Americas. Part of the 19th Century Civil Architecture in Ponce NRHP thematic nomination.
5 Armstrong-Toro House
Armstrong-Toro House
Armstrong-Toro House
October 29, 1987
(#87001821)
9 Unión Street
18°00′42″N 66°36′53″W / 18.011728°N 66.614622°W / 18.011728; -66.614622 (Armstrong-Toro House)
Segundo Neoclassical designed by Manuel Domenech and built in 1899. It played an important role in the development of the Ponce Creole architectural style inspired by the Belle Époque. Today preserved as a museum by the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture.
6 Banco Crédito y Ahorro Ponceño
Banco Crédito y Ahorro Ponceño
Banco Crédito y Ahorro Ponceño
June 25, 1987
(#87001002)
Junction of Marina and Amor Streets
18°00′41″N 66°36′48″W / 18.011314°N 66.613333°W / 18.011314; -66.613333 (Banco Crédito y Ahorro Ponceño)
Tercero Beaux Arts-style bank building designed by Francisco Porrata Doria and built in 1924.
7 Banco de Ponce
Banco de Ponce
Banco de Ponce
June 25, 1987
(#87001003)
Junction of Amor and Comercio Streets
18°00′40″N 66°36′48″W / 18.011111°N 66.613271°W / 18.011111; -66.613271 (Banco de Ponce)
Tercero Beaux Arts-style bank building designed by Francisco Porrata Doria and also built in 1924.
8 Carretera Num. 6
Carretera Num. 6
Carretera Num. 6
September 14, 2021
(#100006919)
Road #6
Coordinates missing
Ponce vicinity Historic 19th-century farm-to-market road constructed to link major coffee-growing areas in nearby Adjuntas with Ponce and its port for the purpose of its trade and export.
9 Casa Alcaldía de Ponce – City Hall
Casa Alcaldía de Ponce – City Hall
Casa Alcaldía de Ponce – City Hall
November 19, 1986
(#86003197)
South side of Plaza Las Delicias
18°00′39″N 66°36′50″W / 18.010730°N 66.613905°W / 18.010730; -66.613905 (Casa Alcaldía de Ponce – City Hall)
Primero The oldest colonial building still standing in the Ponce Historic Zone, the Neoclásico Isabelino-style City Hall from 1846 is a symbol of the city charter granted by Isabella II of Spain and has served as a civic center, jailhouse and reception venue for visiting US presidents and foreign dignitaries.
10 Casa de la Masacre
Casa de la Masacre
Casa de la Masacre
October 20, 2005
(#05001098)
31 Marina Street
18°00′34″N 66°36′49″W / 18.009318°N 66.613537°W / 18.009318; -66.613537 (Casa de la Masacre)
Cuarto As the Ponce headquarters of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party during the 1930s, this house bore witness to the massacre of March 21, 1937, in which 19 demonstrators and bystanders and 2 police officers were killed. It is architecturally significant as an outstanding example of vernacular creole design by Blas Silva from the first decade of the 20th century. It became a museum in 1988.[21]
11 Casa Miguel C. Godreau[g]
Casa Miguel C. Godreau
Casa Miguel C. Godreau
April 30, 1986
(#86000894)
146 Reina Street
18°00′43″N 66°37′08″W / 18.012054°N 66.618850°W / 18.012054; -66.618850 (Casa Miguel C. Godreau)
Segundo House from 1919, designed in an eclectic style by Julio Conesa.[22]
12 Casa Paoli
Casa Paoli
Casa Paoli
October 1, 2009
(#09000769)
14 Mayor Street
18°00′36″N 66°36′46″W / 18.009928°N 66.612659°W / 18.009928; -66.612659 (Casa Paoli)
Cuarto This house was the birthplace and childhood home of great operatic tenor Antonio Paoli (1871–1946) until 1883. It was in Ponce's rich cultural environment that Paoli was first exposed to the arts, and this house is the only property remaining in Puerto Rico associated with the island's first performing artist of international renown.[25]
13 Casa Vives
Casa Vives
Casa Vives
February 13, 2013
(#13000013)
88 Paseo Atocha at Vives/Castillo Street
18°00′51″N 66°36′49″W / 18.014097°N 66.613524°W / 18.014097; -66.613524 (Casa Vives)
Quinto Neoclassical mansion block designed by Juan Bertoli Calderoni and built in 1860, making it one of the oldest brick and mortar residences in Ponce. It was the former residence of coffee plantation owner Carlos Vives.
14 Casino de Ponce
Casino de Ponce
Casino de Ponce
October 28, 1987
(#87001818)
Junction of Marina and Luna Streets
18°00′36″N 66°36′48″W / 18.010082°N 66.613368°W / 18.010082; -66.613368 (Casino de Ponce)
Cuarto Second Empire- and Neo-Rococo-style building from 1922, designed by Agustin Camilo Gonzalez. In addition to its role as a casino it was also used as post office, a civic office and an event venue and reception hall by local businesspeople and visiting dignitaries.
15 Castillo de Serralles[h]
Castillo de Serralles
Castillo de Serralles
November 3, 1980
(#80004494)
Cerro El Vigía
18°01′07″N 66°37′09″W / 18.018698°N 66.619274°W / 18.018698; -66.619274 (Castillo de Serralles)
Portugués Urbano Spanish Mediterranean style "castle" from 1926 designed by Pedro Adolfo de Castro and built for sugarcane magnate Juan Serrallés Colón, founder of Hacienda Mercedita.[26]
16 Cathedral Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe of Ponce
Cathedral Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe of Ponce
Cathedral Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe of Ponce
December 10, 1984
(#84000467)
Plaza Las Delicias
18°00′43″N 66°36′50″W / 18.011839°N 66.613992°W / 18.011839; -66.613992 (Cathedral Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe of Ponce)
Segundo Neoclassical cathedral from 1835 designed by Francisco Porrata Doria to replace the former church building that was previously damaged by earthquakes and fires. It is also of cultural importance as it hosts the yearly Las Mañanitas in honor of the city patroness Our Lady of Guadalupe.
17 Cementerio Antiguo de Ponce
Cementerio Antiguo de Ponce
Cementerio Antiguo de Ponce
January 5, 1984
(#84003149)
1 Torre Street at Frontispicio Street
18°00′57″N 66°37′04″W / 18.015833°N 66.617778°W / 18.015833; -66.617778 (Cementerio Antiguo de Ponce)
Segundo Neo-classical municipal cemetery from 1842. Its 1864 enlargement was designed by Nieto Blajol Iglesia and today it serves as a cemetery museum and as the Román Baldorioty de Castro National Pantheon.
18 Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul[i]
Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul
Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul
August 25, 1988
(#88001249)
Alma Sublime Street
18°01′00″N 66°38′02″W / 18.016596°N 66.633782°W / 18.016596; -66.633782 (Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul)
Magueyes Urbano Historic Classical Revival, Spanish Revival, Art Deco cemetery from 1901, also known as the Catholic Cemetery of Ponce.[28]
19 Centro Ceremonial Indígena
Centro Ceremonial Indígena
Centro Ceremonial Indígena
April 14, 1978
(#78003381)
Highway 503
18°02′32″N 66°37′18″W / 18.042236°N 66.621781°W / 18.042236; -66.621781 (Centro Ceremonial Indígena)
Tibes and Portugués Archaeological site also known as the Tibes Site consisting of pre-Hispanic ceremonial ball courts or bateyes, in addition to pre-Taino burial sites dating to at least 700 AD. Part of the Ball court/plaza sites of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands multiple property submission. Today managed by the municipality as the Tibes Indigenous Ceremonial Center.
20 Edificio Empresas Ferré
Edificio Empresas Ferré
Edificio Empresas Ferré
August 27, 2013
(#13000638)
834 Eugenio María de Hostos Avenue
17°58′55″N 66°37′12″W / 17.981903°N 66.620132°W / 17.981903; -66.620132 (Edificio Empresas Ferré)
Playa Mid 20th-century International Style office and workshop building and former headquarters of Ponce Cement and Puerto Rico Iron Works. The listing includes "La Fundición", a mural painted in its lobby by famed muralist Rafael Ríos Rey in 1953.
21 Edificio Municipal de la Playa de Ponce
Edificio Municipal de la Playa de Ponce
Edificio Municipal de la Playa de Ponce
August 27, 2013
(#13000639)
28 Alfonso XII Street at Padre Noel Avenue
17°58′55″N 66°37′16″W / 17.981943°N 66.621142°W / 17.981943; -66.621142 (Edificio Municipal de la Playa de Ponce)
Playa Designed by Manuel V. Domenech in a in a Reinaissance-inspired Spanish Revival style, it served as the former municipal civic center of the Ponce Playa district, a settlement that grew in and around the Port of Ponce in the 19th century.
22 Faro de la Isla de Caja de Muertos
Faro de la Isla de Caja de Muertos
Faro de la Isla de Caja de Muertos
October 22, 1981
(#81000690)
Isla Caja de Muertos
17°53′35″N 66°31′16″W / 17.893159°N 66.521189°W / 17.893159; -66.521189 (Faro de la Isla de Caja de Muertos)
Playa Spanish-built Neo-classical lighthouse from 1887 located in the island of Caja de Muertos.
23 Faro del Puerto de Ponce
Faro del Puerto de Ponce
Faro del Puerto de Ponce
October 22, 1981
(#81000691)
Isla Cardona, Ponce Harbor
17°57′24″N 66°38′06″W / 17.956800°N 66.635000°W / 17.956800; -66.635000 (Faro del Puerto de Ponce)
Playa Spanish-built Neo-classical lighthouse from 1889 located in Cardona Island at the entrance to the Port of Ponce.
24 Font–Ubides House
Font–Ubides House
Font–Ubides House
October 29, 1987
(#87001825)
34 Castillo Street
18°00′54″N 66°36′39″W / 18.014913°N 66.610786°W / 18.014913; -66.610786 (Font–Ubides House)
Quinto Historic Ponce Creole-style residence building designed by Blas C. Silva and built in 1913.
25 Hacienda Buena Vista
Hacienda Buena Vista
Hacienda Buena Vista
October 17, 1994
(#91001499)
Highway123, km 16.8, near Corral Viejo
18°05′03″N 66°39′17″W / 18.084104°N 66.654591°W / 18.084104; -66.654591 (Hacienda Buena Vista)
Magueyes Historic and well-preserved coffee plantation from 1833. Its main plantation house was built in a traditional Spanish Colonial-style while its surrounding buildings and warehouses consist of a Vernacular style. It contains the last remaining example of a Barker hydraulic turbine in the world.
26 Iglesia de la Santísima Trinidad
Iglesia de la Santísima Trinidad
Iglesia de la Santísima Trinidad
September 29, 1986
(#86002766)
Marina, Salud, and Abolición Streets
18°00′25″N 66°36′46″W / 18.007006°N 66.612770°W / 18.007006; -66.612770 (Iglesia de la Santísima Trinidad)
Cuarto Late Gothic Revival and Mission/Spanish Revival-style church from 1926. The congregation is the first Anglican and oldest Protestant church in Puerto Rico and the only one existing prior to the American invasion in 1898.
27 La Perla Auditorium and Public Library
La Perla Auditorium and Public Library
La Perla Auditorium and Public Library
September 27, 2021
(#100007054)
Calle Mayor Esq. Cristina
18°00′44″N 66°36′43″W / 18.0122°N 66.6119°W / 18.0122; -66.6119 (La Perla Auditorium and Public Library)
Tercero The second oldest theater building in Puerto Rico, designed by Juan Bertoli Calderoni and built under the initiative of Francisco Parra Duperón between 1860 and 1864.
28 McCabe Memorial Church
McCabe Memorial Church
McCabe Memorial Church
April 11, 2008
(#08000283)
835 Eugenio María de Hostos Avenue
17°58′56″N 66°37′14″W / 17.982187°N 66.620440°W / 17.982187; -66.620440 (McCabe Memorial Church)
Playa Neo-gothic church designed by Antonin Nechodoma and built in 1908 as part of a missional outreach of the American Methodist Church. It is one of the oldest Protestant congregations in Puerto Rico.
29 Mercado de las Carnes
Mercado de las Carnes
Mercado de las Carnes
November 17, 1986
(#86003199)
Alley connecting Mayor and León Streets, between Estrella and Guadalupe Streets
18°00′56″N 66°36′46″W / 18.015477°N 66.612878°W / 18.015477; -66.612878 (Mercado de las Carnes)
Quinto Early Art Deco meat market from 1926 designed by Rafael Carmoega. Built as a pedestrian mall across from the historic Ponce Marketplace it incorporates Revivalist elements inspired by Spanish Baroque and Mudéjar styles.
30 Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church
October 29, 1987
(#87001822)
135 Villa Street
18°00′37″N 66°36′58″W / 18.010405°N 66.616094°W / 18.010405; -66.616094 (Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church)
Primero Bungalow, integrating Neo-Gothic, Spanish Revival, Spanish Baroque, and byzantine elements, from 1907, designed by Antonin Nechodoma.
31 Oppenheimer House
Oppenheimer House
Oppenheimer House
October 29, 1987
(#87001824)
47 Salud Street
18°00′34″N 66°36′43″W / 18.009418°N 66.611890°W / 18.009418; -66.611890 (Oppenheimer House)
Cuarto Ponce Creole-style house with elements from the Barcelona School from 1913, designed by Alfredo B. Weichers for Isabel Oppenheimer de Santiago.
32 Parque de Bombas de Ponce
Parque de Bombas de Ponce
Parque de Bombas de Ponce
July 12, 1984
(#84003150)
Plaza Las Delicias
18°00′43″N 66°36′49″W / 18.011905°N 66.613738°W / 18.011905; -66.613738 (Parque de Bombas de Ponce)
Segundo Historic firehouse built in a Gothic style in 1882 by Maximo de Meana y Guridi originally as an exhibit pavilion for the 1882 Exhibition Trade Fair in Ponce. Today it serves as the Museo Parque de Bombas.
33 Ponce High School
Ponce High School
Ponce High School
August 4, 1987
(#87001310)
Cristina Street
18°00′42″N 66°36′37″W / 18.011550°N 66.610260°W / 18.011550; -66.610260 (Ponce High School)
Tercero Classical Revival school building complex from 1915, designed by Adrian C. Finlayson. At the time it was the largest school in the island and today it stands as a landmark of the history of education in Puerto Rico.
34 Ponce Public School 1913 August 23, 2022
(#100008052)
Calle Concordia
18°00′27″N 66°36′53″W / 18.007629°N 66.614647°W / 18.007629; -66.614647 (Ponce Public School 1913)
Primero This 1913 school was designed by insular architect Albert B. McCulloch using the Mission Revival and Classical Revival styles. It is architecturally significant as a well-preserved example of the Puerto Rican school buildings of the early 20th century, a period of great transformation in Puerto Rico under the American administration.[30]
35 Ponce YMCA Building
Ponce YMCA Building
Ponce YMCA Building
June 4, 2012
(#12000331)
7843 Nazaret Street, Urbanización Santa María
18°00′21″N 66°37′02″W / 18.005888°N 66.617149°W / 18.005888; -66.617149 (Ponce YMCA Building)
Canas Urbano Historic YMCA famous for its mural "El Hombre" by famed artist Rafael Ríos Rey. Part of the Rafael Rios Rey Multiple Property Submission.
36 Puente Río Portugués
Puente Río Portugués
Puente Río Portugués
January 6, 2015
(#14001134)
Eugenio María de Hostos Avenue, spanning the historic channel of Río Portugués
17°59′36″N 66°36′55″W / 17.993399°N 66.615293°W / 17.993399; -66.615293 (Puente Río Portugués)
Playa Historic Art Deco bridge from 1933 built to replace an important bridge along the Carretera Central which had been previously destroyed by flooding.
37 Rosaly–Batiz House
Rosaly–Batiz House
Rosaly–Batiz House
September 29, 1986
(#86002768)
125 Villa Street
18°00′39″N 66°36′55″W / 18.01072°N 66.61522°W / 18.01072; -66.61522 (Rosaly–Batiz House)
Primero Italian Renaissance Palazzo house designed by Manuel V. Domenech in 1897 for the mayor of Ponce Pedro Juan Rosaly.
38 Salazar–Candal House
Salazar–Candal House
Salazar–Candal House
June 9, 1988
(#88000663)
53 Isabel Street
18°00′45″N 66°36′42″W / 18.012546°N 66.611729°W / 18.012546; -66.611729 (Salazar–Candal House)
Tercero Distinctive Ponce Creole-style house from 1911, designed by Blas C. Silva for Dr. Guillermo Salazar Palau and his wife Sara Isabel Rivera Carbonell. Today it hosts the Ponce History Museum.
39 Subirá House
Subirá House
Subirá House
October 28, 1987
(#87001826)
107 Reina Street
18°00′43″N 66°36′58″W / 18.012038°N 66.616116°W / 18.012038; -66.616116 (Subirá House)
Segundo Historic Ponce Creole-style house from 1910, designed by Blas C. Silva for Concepción Subirá Echevarría and her husband Manuel Frau de la Sierra.
40 Fernando Luis Toro Casa[j]
Fernando Luis Toro Casa
Fernando Luis Toro Casa
March 5, 1986
(#86000421)
3 Obispado Street, La Alhambra
18°01′04″N 66°36′21″W / 18.017812°N 66.605786°W / 18.017812; -66.605786 (Fernando Luis Toro Casa)
Machuelo Abajo Historic home with eclectic architecture inspired by the Victorian, Georgian, Neo-classic, Beaux Arts, Spanish Revival and Catalan Modernist styles, designed by Francisco Porrata Doria in 1927.
41 U.S. Custom House
U.S. Custom House
U.S. Custom House
February 10, 1988
(#88000073)
Junction of Bonaire and Aduana Streets
17°58′47″N 66°37′12″W / 17.979817°N 66.619953°W / 17.979817; -66.619953 (U.S. Custom House)
Playa Built in 1842, it is the oldest custom house in Puerto Rico, designed in a Spanish colonial-style possibly by Albert B. Nichols. It served as the Ponce headquarters for Nelson A. Miles during the Puerto Rico campaign of the Spanish–American War.
42 Villaronga House
Villaronga House
Villaronga House
August 24, 1984
(#84003151)
106 Reina Street
18°00′44″N 66°36′57″W / 18.012310°N 66.615850°W / 18.012310; -66.615850 (Villaronga House)
Segundo Historic Classical Revival house from 1921, designed by Alfredo B. Wiechers. Today it is owned by the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture and hosts the Ponce Museum of Architecture.
43 Zaldo de Nebot Residencia[k]
Zaldo de Nebot Residencia
Zaldo de Nebot Residencia
June 9, 1988
(#88000643)
27 Marina Street
18°00′35″N 66°36′49″W / 18.009685°N 66.613687°W / 18.009685; -66.613687 (Zaldo de Nebot Residencia)
Primero Built to a Neoclassical design in 1895, this house is one of the fullest expressions of 19th century architecture for Ponce's wealthy creole class. Notable are the trompe-l'œil interior wall paintings of Parisian landmarks and fin de siècle decorative detailing.[36]

Salinas[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Central Aguirre Historic District
Central Aguirre Historic District
Central Aguirre Historic District
October 23, 2002
(#02001208)
Highway 705, south from Highway 3, km 151.3
17°57′20″N 66°13′29″W / 17.955628°N 66.224612°W / 17.955628; -66.224612 (Central Aguirre Historic District)
Aguirre Historic district consisting of the Central Aguirre sugar mill and neighboring company town from 1899. Many contributing buildings are a prime example of the Late 19th and Early 20th Century American Movements, particular the Traditional industrial style.

Santa Isabel[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Dr. Martin G. Brumbaugh Graded School
Dr. Martin G. Brumbaugh Graded School
Dr. Martin G. Brumbaugh Graded School
February 4, 2011
(#10001217)
33 Eugenio M. de Hostos Street
17°58′04″N 66°24′15″W / 17.967723°N 66.404196°W / 17.967723; -66.404196 (Dr. Martin G. Brumbaugh Graded School)
Santa Isabel Pueblo Historic school building from 1906.
2 Sistema de riego de las tres haciendas December 13, 2016
(#16000853)
Linear district roughly parallel to Highway 153, between Highway 52 to the north and Highway 1 to the south
17°58′47″N 66°23′23″W / 17.979684°N 66.389632°W / 17.979684; -66.389632 (Sistema de riego de las tres haciendas)
Boca Velázquez, Jauca II, Felicia II, Felicia I, Santa Isabel Pueblo Historic irrigation system built to transport water from the Coamo River to the Hacienda Santa Isabel, Florida and El Destino sugarcane plantations.

Yauco[edit]

[2] Name on the Register Image Date listed[3] Location Barrio Description
1 Casa Agostini
Casa Agostini
Casa Agostini
June 9, 1988
(#88000682)
Dr. Gatell Street, between Santiago Vivaldi and Comercio Streets
18°02′04″N 66°50′53″W / 18.034566°N 66.847933°W / 18.034566; -66.847933 (Casa Agostini)
Yauco Pueblo A Classical Revival building designed by Miguel Briganti Pinti as both a residence and coffee warehouse for Corsican immigrant Jose Maria Agostini Santini.
2 Casa Franceschi Antongiorgi
Casa Franceschi Antongiorgi
Casa Franceschi Antongiorgi
January 16, 1985
(#85000113)
Junction of 25th of July Street and Barbosa Street
18°02′01″N 66°50′55″W / 18.033505°N 66.848713°W / 18.033505; -66.848713 (Casa Franceschi Antongiorgi)
Yauco Pueblo A Beaux Arts-style house from 1907. Also known as the Flemming House.
3 Casona Césari
Casona Césari
Casona Césari
January 16, 1985
(#85000114)
25th of July Street
18°02′00″N 66°51′05″W / 18.033277°N 66.851263°W / 18.033277; -66.851263 (Casona Césari)
Yauco Pueblo Historic Puerto Rican creole vernacular house designed by Antonio Mattei Lluberas and built by built in 1893 by Angelo Cesari Poggi in 1893.
4 Chalet Amill
Chalet Amill
Chalet Amill
January 16, 1985
(#85000115)
33 Mattei Lluveras Street
18°02′08″N 66°51′00″W / 18.035620°N 66.850109°W / 18.035620; -66.850109 (Chalet Amill)
Yauco Pueblo Historic Beaux Arts house built in 1914 for Angel Antongiorgi Paoli. It formerly served as a hotel.
5 Filardi House
Filardi House
Filardi House
January 16, 1985
(#85000116)
Junction of 25th of July Street and Baldorioty Street
18°02′00″N 66°51′00″W / 18.033258°N 66.849906°W / 18.033258; -66.849906 (Filardi House)
Yauco Pueblo This 1916 house is notable for its extensive use of concrete sculptural ornamentation. Juan Bautista and Domingo Filardi integrated the outstanding decorative features with the overall Beaux-Arts plan,[l] and later came to be recognized as experts in cast concrete ornamental elements.[37]
6 Logia Masónica Hijos de la Luz
Logia Masónica Hijos de la Luz
Logia Masónica Hijos de la Luz
June 9, 1988
(#88000684)
José Celso Barbosa Avenue
18°01′55″N 66°50′54″W / 18.031929°N 66.848455°W / 18.031929; -66.848455 (Logia Masónica Hijos de la Luz)
Yauco Pueblo Possibly the first or at least oldest masonic lodge in Puerto Rico, it was designed in the Classical Revival-style by André Troublard and built by Jesus Emmanuelli in 1894.
7 Public Health Unit at Yauco October 14, 2021
(#100007078)
64 Comercio St.
18°02′05″N 66°51′13″W / 18.0346°N 66.8536°W / 18.0346; -66.8536 (Public Health Unit at Yauco)
Yauco Pueblo Historic community health services unit building built in 1937 in the Spanish Revival-style.
8 Residencia González Vivaldi
Residencia González Vivaldi
Residencia González Vivaldi
February 5, 1987
(#86003201)
26 Mattei Lluveras Street
18°02′09″N 66°50′53″W / 18.035823°N 66.847939°W / 18.035823; -66.847939 (Residencia González Vivaldi)
Yauco Pueblo Vernacular Creole-style house from 1880 with elements of Art Nouveau.
9 Teatro Ideal
Teatro Ideal
Teatro Ideal
June 9, 1988
(#88000683)
Comercio Street
18°02′05″N 66°50′54″W / 18.034752°N 66.848372°W / 18.034752; -66.848372 (Teatro Ideal)
Yauco Pueblo Early 20th-century eclectic historic theater located in the main town square of Yauco.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The listed portion of the Carretera Central extends into Caguas, Cidra, Cayey, Aibonito, Coamo, and Juana Díaz. The roadway route in San Juan and Ponce, as well as a portion in Caguas, was excluded from the National Register listing.
  2. ^ Spanish: casillas de caminero.
  3. ^ The name of Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz is presented here without the accent on "Díaz" in conformance with the usage in the house's National Register nomination form[14] and announcement of listing.[15] The latter source additionally omits the accent from "Ramón", which was retained here.
  4. ^ Construction of the Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz began in 1807. A completion date is not stated in the available sources. Major elements (the north tower) were added possibly as late as 1895.
  5. ^ Federal and state laws and practices restrict general public access to information regarding the specific location of this resource. In some cases, this is to protect archaeological sites from vandalism, while in other cases it is restricted at the request of the owner.
  6. ^ Rafael Carmoega, at the time Chief Architect in the Division of Public Works of the Puerto Rico Department of the Interior, was the architect of record while Gardón Vega, a drafter in the division, was responsible for the school's design.
  7. ^ Sources authoritative with regard to National Register listing parameters give different forms of the house's name, including Casa Miguel C. Godreau from the house's nomination form[22] and official announcement of entry on the National Register,[23] and Godreau, Miguel C., Casa from the comprehensive National Register database.[24] This article adopts the first of these, Casa Miguel C. Godreau, because it offers the most proper Spanish usage.
  8. ^ The name of the Castillo de Serralles is presented here without the accent on "Serrallés" in conformance with the usage in the house's National Register nomination form[26] and Federal Register announcement of listing.[27]
  9. ^ The name of the Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul is presented here without the accent on "Católico" in conformance with the usage in the cemetery's National Register nomination form[28] and announcement of listing.[29]
  10. ^ The name of the Fernando Luis Toro Casa is presented here using word order (name preceding "Casa") that conforms to the usage in the house's National Register announcement of listing[31] and subsequent database entries.[32][33]
  11. ^ The name of the Zaldo de Nebot Residencia is presented here using word order (personal name preceding "Residencia") that conforms to the usage in the house's National Register announcement of listing[34] and subsequent database entries.[32][35]
  12. ^ Juan Bautista and Domingo Filardi's father, Vicente Filardi, was the general contractor with overall responsibility for design and construction for the Filardi House.

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior, "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions", retrieved April 5, 2024.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Numbers represent an alphabetical ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  4. ^ a b Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (2003), Museo Casa Cautiño, Guayama (in Spanish), archived from the original on April 20, 2010, retrieved May 11, 2017.
  5. ^ Morales Parés, Armando (April 23, 1984), National Register of Historic Places Inventory — Nomination Form: Casa Cautiño (PDF), retrieved May 11, 2017.
  6. ^ Pumarada O'Neill, Luis (July 31, 1994), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Cayey Bridge (PDF), archived (PDF) from the original on October 21, 2019, retrieved October 20, 2019.
  7. ^ Rigau, Jorge (March 16, 1987), National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Eleuterio Derkes Grammar School (PDF), archived from the original on October 22, 2019, retrieved October 21, 2019.
  8. ^ Davila, Arturo V. (March 27, 1975), National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Iglesia Parroquial de San Antonio de Padua de Guayama (PDF), archived from the original on October 24, 2019, retrieved October 24, 2019.
  9. ^ Colberg, Antonio E. (July 12, 1976), National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Ingenio Azucarero Vives (PDF), archived (PDF) from the original on October 28, 2019, retrieved October 24, 2019.
  10. ^ EPRL Editorial Group (September 17, 2014). "Ingenio Azucarero Vives, Guayama". Enciclopedia de Puerto Rico (in Spanish). Archived from the original on October 26, 2019. Retrieved October 26, 2019.
  11. ^ Rigau, Jorge (August 25, 2012), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Padre Nazario School (PDF), retrieved October 28, 2019.
  12. ^ Llanes Santos, Juan (March 5, 2019), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Carretera Central.
  13. ^ Documento de inclusión de la Carretera Central en el RNLH (2019). Geo-Isla. 2020. Accessed 1 August 2020.
  14. ^ a b Gómez, Marisa; Cardona, Ester (July 1984), National Register of Historic Places Inventory — Nomination Form: Church San Juan Bautista y San Ramón Nonato of Juana Diaz (PDF), retrieved April 27, 2017.
  15. ^ National Park Service (December 21, 1984), Weekly announcement of National Register of Historic Places actions (PDF), p. 179, retrieved February 13, 2016.
  16. ^ Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Office (April 1, 2014), Iglesia San Juan Batista y San Ramón Nonato (PDF) (summary sheet) (in Spanish), archived from the original (PDF) on June 8, 2017, retrieved June 8, 2017.
  17. ^ Knoerl, John; Miller, Diane; Shrimpton, Rebecca H. (1990), Guidelines for Restricting Information about Historic and Prehistoric Resources, National Register Bulletin, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, OCLC 20706997.
  18. ^ Rodriguez, Yasha N.; Alvarado Zayas, Pedro; Sueiro, Berenice R. (2008), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Cueva Lucero (PDF) (redacted), archived from the original (PDF) on February 16, 2017, retrieved June 13, 2017.
  19. ^ Rigau, Jorge; Marrero, Guillermo (August 9, 2012), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Daniel Webster School (PDF), archived (PDF) from the original on January 25, 2020, retrieved January 25, 2020.
  20. ^ Llanes Santos, Juan (November 7, 2019), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Acueducto Alfonso XII.
  21. ^ Llanes Santos, Juan; Pagán, Jacqueline (June 2005), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Casa de la Masacre (PDF), archived from the original (PDF) on March 9, 2016, retrieved March 8, 2016.
  22. ^ a b Del Cueto Pantel, Beatriz (February 1986), National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Casa Miguel C. Godreau (PDF), retrieved February 21, 2016.
  23. ^ National Park Service (May 9, 1986), Weekly announcement of National Register of Historic Places actions (PDF), p. 55, retrieved February 21, 2016.
  24. ^ National Park Service (n.d.), "Godreau, Miguel C., Casa", NPS Focus, archived from the original on March 4, 2016, retrieved March 7, 2016.
  25. ^ Llanes Santos, Juan (August 11, 2009), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Casa Paoli (PDF), archived from the original (PDF) on March 10, 2016, retrieved March 10, 2016.
  26. ^ a b Muñoz Polanco, Luis (July 7, 1980), National Register of Historic Places Inventory—Nomination Form: Castillo de Serralles (PDF), retrieved February 22, 2016.
  27. ^ "Department of the Interior, National Park Service: National Register of Historic Places; Annual Listing of Historic Properties", 47 FR 4932 (February 2, 1982), at 4951.
  28. ^ a b Cruz Case, Marta (April 1988), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Cementerio Catolico San Vicente de Paul (PDF), retrieved February 21, 2016.
  29. ^ National Park Service (September 2, 1988), Weekly List of Listed Properties: 8/22/88 through 8/26/88 (PDF), p. 119, retrieved February 21, 2016.
  30. ^ Cosme Nazario, Rosamil (October 21, 2021), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Ponce Public School 1913.
  31. ^ National Park Service (March 14, 1986), Weekly announcement of National Register of Historic Places actions (PDF), p. 28, retrieved February 17, 2016.
  32. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  33. ^ National Park Service (n.d.), "Toro, Fernando Luis, Casa", NPS Focus, archived from the original on March 5, 2016, retrieved February 17, 2016.
  34. ^ National Park Service (June 24, 1988), Weekly announcement of National Register of Historic Places actions (PDF), p. 73, archived from the original (PDF) on December 28, 2019, retrieved February 9, 2020.
  35. ^ National Park Service (n.d.), "Nebot, Zaldo de, Residencia", NPGallery Digital Asset Management System, archived from the original on February 5, 2020, retrieved February 9, 2020.
  36. ^ Del Campo, Félix Julián; Santiago, Héctor (August 1987), National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Residencia Zaldo de Nebot (PDF), archived (PDF) from the original on February 24, 2017, retrieved February 4, 2020.
  37. ^ Torres, Jerry; Morales, Armando (August 1984), National Register of Historic Places Inventory — Nomination Form: Filardi House (PDF), retrieved March 20, 2016.

External links[edit]

External sources[edit]