Speak Now (Taylor's Version)

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

Speak Now (Taylor's Version)
A photo of Taylor Swift looking back over her shoulders in a purple dress
Studio album (re-recorded) by
ReleasedJuly 7, 2023 (2023-07-07)
Studio
Genre
Length104:33
LabelRepublic
Producer
Taylor Swift chronology
Midnights
(2022)
Speak Now (Taylor's Version)
(2023)
1989 (Taylor's Version)
(2023)

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) is the third re-recorded album by the American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift, released on July 7, 2023, by Republic Records. It is a re-recording of Swift's third studio album, Speak Now (2010), part of Swift's counteraction to a 2019 masters dispute regarding the ownership of her back catalog. The album was announced on May 5, 2023, at the first Nashville show of her Eras Tour.

Swift wrote all 22 tracks on Speak Now (Taylor's Version) by herself. The album contains re-recorded versions of the 16 songs from Speak Now's deluxe edition, produced by Swift and Christopher Rowe; and six previously unreleased "From the Vault" tracks, produced by Swift, Aaron Dessner, and Jack Antonoff. The American rock musicians Fall Out Boy and Hayley Williams featured on two vault tracks. Strongly influenced by rock styles, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) is an incorporation of country pop and pop rock, with styles of emo, pop-punk, and gothic rock. Its dynamic compositions consist of acoustic instruments alongside electric guitars, drums, and strings. Lyrically, it is a loose concept album about unspoken confessions that document the volatile emotions of Swift's adolescence.

The album received acclaim from music critics, who complimented the vocals and emotionally engaging songwriting. Some critics nonetheless debated the lyrical change on the re-recording of "Better than Revenge" with mixed opinions. Commercially, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) reached number one on albums charts of Australia, Canada, Belgian Flanders, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. In the United States, it marked Swift's 12th album to top the Billboard 200 chart, breaking Barbra Streisand's all-time record for the most number-one albums by a female artist. All 22 of its tracks debuted on the Billboard Hot 100, with "I Can See You" as its highest charting song at number five.

Background[edit]

I first made Speak Now, completely self-written, between the ages of 18 and 20. The songs that came from this time in my life were marked by their brutal honesty, unfiltered diaristic confessions and wild wistfulness. I love this album because it tells a tale of growing up, flailing, flying and crashing… and living to speak about it.

— Swift looking back on Speak Now on her social media[1]
Swift performing on the Speak Now World Tour (2011–2012)

Taylor Swift released her third studio album, Speak Now, on October 25, 2010, under Big Machine Records. A predominantly pop rock and country pop album, Speak Now was entirely self-written by Swift. It received positive reviews from music journalists, who have since praised it for being a self-written Swift album about "dismissals of exploitative male characters and poetic embrace of girlhood."[2] It sold over 1,047,000 copies within its opening week in the United States—the largest first week in history for a female country artist,[3] and the first million-selling week of Swift's career, a feat she would go on to repeat five more times.[4] Speak Now achieved the Guinness World Record as the fastest selling album in the US by a female country act.[5] At the 54th Annual Grammy Awards (2012), its single "Mean" won Best Country Solo Performance and Best Country Song.[6]

Swift released three more studio albums under Big Machine, as per her recording contract, which expired in November 2018. She hence withdrew from Big Machine and signed a new deal with Republic Records, which secured her the rights to own the masters of any new music she would release.[7] In 2019, American businessman Scooter Braun acquired Big Machine;[8] the ownership of the masters to Swift's first six studio albums, including Speak Now, transferred to him.[9] In August 2019, Swift denounced Braun's purchase and announced that she would re-record her first six studio albums so as to own their masters herself.[10] Swift began the re-recording process in November 2020.[11] Fearless (Taylor's Version), the first of her six re-recorded albums, was released on April 9, 2021, followed by Red (Taylor's Version) on November 12, 2021; both achieved critical and commercial success, debuting atop the US Billboard 200 chart.[12][13]

Speculations about Swift's next re-recorded album being Speak Now dated back as far as November 2021, when she released Red (Taylor's Version), referencing key words of the 2010 era in social media posts.[14] The music videos for "Bejeweled" (2022) and "Lavender Haze" (2023) contained numerous Easter eggs referencing Speak Now.[15][16] Fan theories intensified after Swift's 2023 concert tour, the Eras Tour, began; the multi-colored wristbands that attendees received flashed purple at the end of a concert. Swift hinted at a re-release during the performance of "Speak Now", and used a purple heart emoji on social media days before the announcement.[17]

On May 5, 2023, at the first Nashville date of the Eras Tour, Swift announced Speak Now (Taylor's Version) and its release date on July 7.[18] The announcement acted as a lead-in to one of her "surprise songs", an acoustic version of the album's second track "Sparks Fly"; lights along the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge turned purple.[19] She subsequently revealed in social media posts, "I love this album because it tells a tale of growing up, flailing, flying and crashing ... and living to speak about it".[20] Swift emphasized the hardships she faced in her life during the time she wrote the record, noting the lyrics as containing "brutal honesty, unfiltered diaristic confessions and wild wistfulness".[21]

Writing and production[edit]

Fall Out Boy (left) and Hayley Williams (right) feature on the vault tracks "Electric Touch" and "Castles Crumbling", respectively.

The album consists of 22 tracks: the re-recordings of the 14 songs from the standard edition, two of the three deluxe edition tracks, "Ours" and "Superman", and six previously unreleased "From the Vault" songs that were written for the 2010 album but never included.[22] The remaining deluxe edition track "If This Was a Movie" was not included because it was the sole track on the album not written solely by Swift, and its re-recording was instead released as a standalone promotional single and as part of a Fearless (Taylor’s Version)-themed compilation on March 17, 2023. All the songs were written solely by Swift, as a reaction to those who questioned her artistic integrity as a songwriter.[23]

The re-recorded tracks were produced by Swift and Christopher Rowe, whereas the "From the Vault" tracks were produced by Swift with longtime collaborators Aaron Dessner and Jack Antonoff. Two of the vault tracks, "Electric Touch" and "Castles Crumbling", feature American rock band Fall Out Boy and American singer-songwriter Hayley Williams, the frontwoman of rock band Paramore, respectively. Speak Now (Taylor's Version) retained all the original lyrics, except a previously controversial line ("She's better known for the things / That she does on the mattress") in the chorus of "Better than Revenge", which was replaced with "He was a moth to the flame / She was holding the matches".[24][25]

Music and lyrics[edit]

Composition[edit]

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) is rooted in Swift's trademark country-pop sound,[26] but also stylistically embraces pop-rock.[27] Clash critic Alex Berry described the album as a seamless blend of rock, country, and pop.[28] As Swift's most "rock-focused" album, it incorporates an ensemble of rock genres,[23] such as pop-punk,[29] emo,[30] and alternative rock.[31] The melodies are characterized by rousing electric guitars, heavy drumming, orchestral elements and eruptive choruses.[23] Critics said that the re-recorded tracks have a better audio quality brought by "thicker" guitars and enhanced sonics than those of the original recordings.[23][32][33] A loose concept album, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) is mainly about "words left unsaid". Inspired by Swift's life between the ages of 18 and 20, it is an autobiographical album exploring the angst of late teenage and her adolescent perspectives of life, romance and career.[23][28][33]

"From the Vault" tracks[edit]

Emma Stone, whom "When Emma Falls in Love" is assumed to be written about

Critics opined that the six vault songs are in line with the pop-rock sound of the original Speak Now.[27] "Electric Touch", featuring Fall Out Boy, is a soaring, cinematic pop-punk song with distorted guitars and crescendo drums. Swift's "creamy" vocals are juxtaposed with Patrick Stump's sharp voice.[23][30][34] It is about the anxieties, pessimism and self-doubt over going on a first date.[33][27] "When Emma Falls in Love" is a mellow song led by piano and banjo,[26][30] presenting Swift's third person perspective of a friend's life and character.[32][30] It incorporates "stately piano balladry and swaying country-pop". Due to its character study of the subject Emma, the song has been compared to Swift's 2020 fictitious albums, Folklore and Evermore.[35] Media outlets considered American actress Emma Stone, a friend of Swift since 2008, as the inspiration.[36]

"I Can See You" is a groovy indie rock song with elements of funk and surf rock.[30][27][35] It is driven by a "choppy" guitar riff and sinuous bass,[33][32] containing "edgy" guitars and flirtatious, sexual suggestive innuendos.[30][29][35] "Castles Crumbling" is a duet between Swift and Williams.[36] It is a smooth ballad about dealing with paranoia over losing the interest of fans,[27][26] depicting their worries worry over "how the empires they built as teens could implode at any moment." It has been widely compared to "Nothing New" (2021), a vault track from Red (Taylor's Version) featuring Phoebe Bridgers.[23][27] "Foolish One" sees Swift chastise herself for her naivety, confronting her "hopeless romantic" side with reality.[29] It is a country pop song driven by acoustic guitar strums and programmed drums.[27][37] In the ballad "Timeless", Swift finds old photos of couples in an antique shop and superimposes herself in their lives.[29] The song's arrangement mainly consists of acoustic guitars and organ, with accents of ukulele and flute.[27]

Release[edit]

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) was released on July 7, 2023, making it Swift's third re-recorded album.[38] The re-recording of "If This Was a Movie", one of the three deluxe edition songs from the original album, and the only one with a co-writer, was released as a promotional single and included on a Fearless (Taylor's Version)-themed streaming compilation on March 17, 2023.[39] The standard vinyl edition of Speak Now (Taylor's Version) is a set of three marbled violet LP records.[40] Two additional lilac and orchid marbled variants were also released.[41][42]

On June 5, 2023, Swift announced the track-list of Speak Now (Taylor's Version).[22] It also revealed the guest features of Fall Out Boy and Williams, who were cited by Swift as influences on her lyrics while writing Speak Now.[22] On June 24, 13 days before the album release, Swift teased a snippet of "Mine (Taylor's Version)" on social media.[43] On June 29, a short preview of "Back to December (Taylor's Version)" was featured in the official trailer for the second season of Amazon Prime Video series The Summer I Turned Pretty.[44]

When the album was released on July 7, Swift premiered the music video for the vault track "I Can See You" at the first Kansas City show on the Eras Tour, which was released to her YouTube channel the day after.[45][46] Directed and written by Swift, the video stars her alongside actors Taylor Lautner, Joey King, and Presley Cash; the latter two previously appeared in Swift's video for "Mean" (2011).[47] On July 13, 2023, Swift released a digital deluxe edition of the album, featuring live recordings of "Dear John" and "Last Kiss" from the Minneapolis and Kansas City shows of the Eras Tour, respectively.[48]

Piracy[edit]

On June 9, 2023, French newspaper Ouest-France reported that a temporary worker from Le Mans, France, was arrested for stealing 10 vinyl records of Speak Now (Taylor's Version) from a warehouse and selling them on Leboncoin, a classified ads website; two copies of the album were sold for 25 each, following which he raised the cost to €50 per unit. The worker—who had been convicted 24 times before for theft, damage, drug trafficking, fraud and various other offences—was sentenced to eight months in prison. The public prosecutor stated that only the eight unsold LPs were retrieved from the worker; the whereabouts of the two sold copies remain unknown, posing a threat of leaking online.[49][50] The back cover, guest features and titles of the vault tracks leaked online before Swift could reveal them.[51]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
AnyDecentMusic?7.6/10[52]
Metacritic81/100[53]
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[54]
American Songwriter[31]
Clash8/10[28]
The Daily Telegraph[55]
The Guardian[29]
The Independent[32]
Pitchfork7.5/10[37]
Rolling Stone UK[30]
Slant Magazine[56]
The Times[57]

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) received critical acclaim. On Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average based on ratings from publications, the album scored 81 out of 100 based on 14 reviews, indicating "universal acclaim".[53] AnyDecentMusic? compiled 13 reviews and gave the album a score of 7.6 out of 10, based on their assessment of the critical consensus.[52]

Maura Johnston of Rolling Stone stated, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) "expands our image of a landmark album", with grittier production quality.[33] The same magazine's UK critic Mark Sutherland wrote, "the empowering, elemental force and simmering hurt that made the original Speak Now such a remarkable record remains strikingly intact."[30] Reviews from Annabel Nugent of The Independent,[32] Poppie Platt of The Daily Telegraph,[55] Jonathan Keefe of Slant Magazine,[56] Rachel Caroll of PopMatters,[34] Stephen Thomas Erlewine of AllMusic,[54] and Will Hodgkinson of The Times praised the album's crisper production mix, emotional heft, added nuance of the vault songs, and Swift's strong and refined vocals.[57] Alex Hopper of American Songwriter and Kelsey Barnes of The Line of Best Fit complimented the album's catharsis for an accurate portrayal of adolescence.[36][31] Spin critic Bobby Olivier admired the album's "rock elegance" and Swift's "mature and textured vocal performance".[23]

The lyric change in "Better than Revenge" was a common point of contention in reviews, with some calling it unnecessary.[55][57][58] Others appreciated the change, opining that it is line with Swift's changed perspective as a grown woman.[24][28][56] The Guardian's Laura Snapes and Pitchfork's Vrinda Jagota said that Swift's voice, despite being "much richer" than in 2010, has lost its "youthful twang" and "teenage angst" but nevertheless considered the album's evolved songwriting and musical consistency impressive.[29][37]

Commercial performance[edit]

Upon release, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) received 126.3 million streams on its opening day on Spotify, breaking the records for the most single-day streams for any album in 2023 and for a country album ever. It also became the second most-streamed album by a female artist in a single day, behind Swift's own Midnights (2022).[59][60]

Swift singing songs from Speak Now (Taylor's Version) at the Eras Tour

In the US, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) spent two weeks atop the Billboard 200.[61] It earned 575,000 album-equivalent units within its first four days, including over 400,000 album sales (of which 225,000 were vinyl LPs), marking the largest consumption and sales week for an album in 2023, as well as the second-largest vinyl sales week in US history, behind Midnights.[62] It debuted atop the Billboard 200 with 716,000 units, including 507,000 album sales (of which 268,500 were vinyl LPs), earning the largest week for a country album since December 2014. Swift set new records among female artists for most number-one albums in chart history (12) and most consecutive years with a new number-one album (5), surpassing Barbra Streisand and Miley Cyrus, respectively. Swift became the first woman to chart four albums in the top 10 simultaneously,[a] the first woman and living soloist to chart 11 albums simultaneously (after the Beatles and Prince),[b][63] and the first act to have nine albums sell at least 500,000 copies in one week.[64] All 22 tracks from Speak Now (Taylor's Version) debuted on the Billboard Hot 100, bringing Swift's total career entries to 212 songs, surpassing the cast of Glee for second-most of all time.[65] The album marked Swift's eighth number-one on the Top Country Albums chart, and all tracks charted on the Hot Country Songs, with seven in the top 10.[66]

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) debuted at number one on the UK Albums Chart with 67,000 units, surpassing the 2010 album's peak (number six) and doubling its first-week sales. Swift became the fastest female artist to collect 10 number-one albums in the UK, surpassing Madonna.[67] In Australia, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) debuted atop the ARIA Albums Chart, displacing Midnights from the top spot. It became Swift's 11th number-one album and made her the first act to replace themselves at the top spot.[68] Fifteen tracks from the album entered the ARIA Singles Chart simultaneously, with three in the top 10.[69]

Recognition[edit]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks are written by Taylor Swift.

Speak Now (Taylor's Version) – Standard edition
No.TitleProducer(s)Length
1."Mine"
3:51
2."Sparks Fly"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:21
3."Back to December"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:54
4."Speak Now"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:02
5."Dear John"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
6:45
6."Mean"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
3:58
7."The Story of Us"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:27
8."Never Grow Up"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:52
9."Enchanted"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
5:53
10."Better than Revenge"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
3:40
11."Innocent"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
5:01
12."Haunted"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:05
13."Last Kiss"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
6:09
14."Long Live"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
5:17
15."Ours"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
3:55
16."Superman"
  • Swift
  • Rowe
4:34
17."Electric Touch" (featuring Fall Out Boy)4:26
18."When Emma Falls in Love"
  • Swift
  • Dessner
4:12
19."I Can See You"4:33
20."Castles Crumbling" (featuring Hayley Williams)
  • Swift
  • Antonoff
5:06
21."Foolish One"
  • Swift
  • Dessner
5:11
22."Timeless"
  • Swift
  • Antonoff
5:21
Total length:104:33
Speak Now (Taylor's Version) – Digital Webstore Exclusive Deluxe Edition
No.TitleLength
23."Dear John" (live from Minneapolis)7:09
24."Last Kiss" (live from Kansas City)6:12
Total length:117:54

Notes

  • Tracks 1–22 are subtitled "Taylor's Version"; and tracks 17–22 are additionally subtitled "From the Vault".
  • The album's CD package consists of two discs; one containing tracks 1–16, and the other with tracks 17–22.
  • "If This Was a Movie", a track on the deluxe edition of the original album, is not present in the re-recording due to the song having a co-writer, but instead was included on the EP The More Fearless (Taylor's Version) Chapter as well as a single on digital platforms.

Personnel[edit]

Musicians

  • Taylor Swift – vocals (all tracks), background vocals (1–16)
  • Mike Meadows – acoustic guitar (1–16), background vocals (1–3, 5, 7, 8, 11, 13–16, 18), Hammond B3 (1–3, 5, 7, 12, 14, 16), mandolin (2, 3, 6, 7, 12, 16), clapping (4, 6), organ (4), banjo (6), electric guitar (10)
  • Amos Heller – bass guitar (1–7, 9–16), clapping (4, 6)
  • Matt Billingslea – drums, percussion (1–7, 9–16); clapping (4, 6), vibraphone (5)
  • Max Bernstein – electric guitar (1–6, 10–12, 14, 16), synthesizer (1, 5, 7, 11, 14), synth pads (3), acoustic guitar (7, 13), strings (11), keyboards (15)
  • Paul Sidoti – slide guitar (1), electric guitar (2–7, 9–16), acoustic guitar (3, 6), ukulele (15)
  • David Cook – piano (2, 5, 11, 12–14)
  • Jonathan Yudkin – fiddle (2, 6)
  • London Contemporary Orchestra[c] – strings (3, 9, 12)
  • Liz Huett – background vocals (4, 6, 7, 16)
  • Caitlin Evanson – background vocals (6, 11, 14)
  • Christopher Rowe – background vocals (9, 18, 22)
  • Brian Pruitt – drum programming (10, 13, 14)
  • Aaron Dessner – acoustic guitar, bass guitar, synthesizer (17, 18, 21); electric guitar (17, 18), percussion (17, 21), piano (18, 21), drum programming (21)
  • Josh Kaufman – electric guitar, organ (17, 18, 21); piano (17, 21), acoustic guitar (17), banjo (18); keyboards, synthesizer (21)
  • Thomas Bartlett – keyboards, piano, synthesizer (17)
  • Benjamin Lanz – synthesizer (17, 18, 21)
  • James McAlister – synthesizer (17, 18, 21); drums, percussion (18, 21); drum programming (21)
  • Joe Russo – drums, percussion (17)
  • Patrick Stump – electric guitar, vocals (17)
  • James Krivchenia – drums (18), percussion (18)
  • Jack Antonoff – acoustic guitar, bass guitar, electric guitar (19, 20, 22); programming, synthesizer (19, 20); 12-string acoustic guitar, background vocals, keyboards (19); drums, piano (20); Mellotron (22)
  • Sean Hutchinson – drums, percussion (19, 20, 22)
  • Mikey Freedom Hart – electric guitar (19), synthesizer (19, 20), Wurlitzer electronic piano (19)
  • Evan Smith – saxophone (19, 20, 22), flute (20, 22); electric guitar, organ, synthesizer (22), ukulele (22)
  • Eric Byers – cello (20)
  • Bobby Hawk – violin (20)
  • Hayley Williams – vocals (20)

Technical

  • Randy Merrill – mastering
  • Serban Ghenea – mixing (1–16, 19, 20, 22)
  • Jonathan Low – mixing, engineering (17, 18, 21)
  • David Payne – engineering (1–16)
  • Derek Garten – editing, engineering, programmer (1–16)
  • Jeremy Murphy – engineering (3, 9, 12)
  • Aaron Dessner – engineering (17, 18, 21)
  • David Hart – engineering (19, 20)
  • Evan Smith – engineering (19, 20, 22)
  • Jack Antonoff – engineering (19, 20, 22)
  • Laura Sisk – engineering (19, 20, 22)
  • Mikey Freedom Hart – engineering (19, 20)
  • Sean Hutchinson – engineering (19, 20, 22)
  • Eric Byers – engineering (20)
  • Jon Gautier – engineering (20)
  • Bryce Bordone – mix engineering (1–16, 19, 20, 22)
  • Christopher Rowe – vocal engineering
  • Taylor York – vocal engineering (20)
  • Lowell Reynolds – editing, engineering assistance (1–16)
  • Bella Blasko – additional engineering (17, 18)
  • Benjamin Lanz – additional engineering (17, 18)
  • James McAlister – additional engineering (17, 18)
  • Thomas Bartlett – additional engineering (17)
  • Patrick Stump – additional engineering (17)
  • John Rooney – engineering assistance (19, 20, 22)
  • Jon Sher – engineering assistance (19, 20, 22)
  • Megan Searl – engineering assistance (19, 20, 22)

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Certifications for Speak Now (Taylor's Version)
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[117] Gold 35,000
New Zealand (RMNZ)[118] Platinum 15,000
United Kingdom (BPI)[119] Gold 100,000

Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

Release history[edit]

Release dates and formats for Speak Now (Taylor's Version)
Region Date Format(s) Version Label Ref.
Various July 7, 2023 Standard Republic [120][121]
United States July 13, 2023 Digital download Deluxe [122]
Japan August 16, 2023 CD Standard Universal Japan [123]
Japan Deluxe [124]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Midnights, Lover, and Folklore charted at numbers five, seven, and 10, respectively.
  2. ^ Red (Taylor's Version), 1989, Reputation, Fearless (Taylor's Version), Evermore, the 2010 version of Speak Now, and Taylor Swift charted at numbers 18, 19, 21, 23, 38, 67, and 138, respectively.
  3. ^ The London Contemporary Orchestra consists of cellists Jonny Byers, Max Ruisi, and Oliver Coates; double bassist Dave Brown; violists Clifton Harrison, Matthew Kettle, Stephanie Edmundson, and Zoe Matthews; and violinists Anna Ovsyanikova, Anna de Bruin, Antonia Kesel, Charis Jenson, Charlotte Reid, Eloisa-Fleur Thorn, Galya Bisengalieva, Guy Button, Natalie Klouda, Nicole O'Donoghue, Nicole Stokes, and Zahra Benyounes.
  4. ^ On the Austrian and German charts, after Speak Now (Taylor's Version) was released, the original Speak Now re-charted with statistics combined with the re-recording. The re-recording was separated into its own chart history in November 2023.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Willman, Chris (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Announces 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Is Coming in July During Concert in Nashville". Variety. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 11, 2023.
  2. ^ "How to reconsider Taylor Swift's latest 'Speak Now' album". CNBC TV18. July 7, 2023. Archived from the original on July 13, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2023 – via Associated Press.
  3. ^ Caulfield, Keith (November 3, 2010). "Taylor Swift Sells Over 1 Million in Record Billboard 200 Debut". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 2, 2016. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  4. ^ Caulfield, Keith (October 30, 2022). "Taylor Swift's Midnights Blasts in at No. 1 on Billboard 200 Chart With Biggest Week for an Album in 7 Years". Billboard. Archived from the original on October 30, 2022. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  5. ^ "Fastest-Selling Album in the US by a Female Country Artist". Guinness World Records. November 10, 2012. Archived from the original on August 1, 2021. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  6. ^ "Grammy Awards 2012: Complete Winners And Nominees List". The Hollywood Reporter. February 12, 2012. Archived from the original on January 22, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  7. ^ Willman, Chris (August 27, 2018). "Taylor Swift Stands to Make Music Business History as a Free Agent". Variety. Archived from the original on August 29, 2018. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  8. ^ Christman, Ed (June 30, 2019). "Scooter Braun Acquires Scott Borchetta's Big Machine Label Group, Taylor Swift Catalog For Over $300 Million". Billboard. Archived from the original on February 13, 2021. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  9. ^ Grady, Constance (July 1, 2019). "The Taylor Swift/Scooter Braun controversy, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on February 11, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  10. ^ "Taylor Swift wants to re-record her old hits after ownership row". BBC News. August 22, 2019. Archived from the original on August 22, 2019. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  11. ^ Aswad, Jem (August 22, 2019). "Taylor Swift Performs on GMA, Talks Re-Recording Big Machine Songs (Watch)". Variety. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  12. ^ Willman, Chris (April 20, 2021). "Taylor Swift's Fearless (Taylor's Version) Debuts Huge: What It Means for Replicating Oldies, Weaponizing Fans". Variety. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  13. ^ Caulfield, Keith (November 21, 2021). "Taylor Swift Scores 10th No. 1 Album on Billboard 200 Chart With Red (Taylor's Version)". Billboard. Archived from the original on November 23, 2021. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  14. ^ Malone Mendez, Chris; Mendez, Michele (October 26, 2022). "Taylor's "Lavender Haze" reignited this Speak Now theory". Elite Daily. Archived from the original on March 24, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  15. ^ Lutkin, Aimée (October 25, 2022). "Taylor's 'Bejeweled' Video is Full of Hints About Her Next Project". W. Archived from the original on December 4, 2022. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  16. ^ Roberts, Savannah (March 28, 2023). "When Is 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Coming Out?". Capital. Archived from the original on April 4, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  17. ^ Leimkuehler, Matthew (May 2, 2023). "Is Taylor Swift teasing a big announcement in Nashville? Her fans think so". The Tennessean. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  18. ^ Lipshutz, Jason; Aniftos, Rania (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Announces Speak Now as Next Re-Recorded Album at Nashville Concert". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  19. ^ Regan, Jenny (May 8, 2023). "Photos & Standout Moments From Taylor Swift's Rainy Nashville Show". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 9, 2023. Retrieved May 17, 2023.
  20. ^ Hussey, Allison (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Announces New Re-Recorded Album Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  21. ^ Avila, Daniela (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Announces Speak Now (Taylor's Version) at Nashville Show: 'I Love to Surprise You'". People. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  22. ^ a b c Strauss, Matthew (June 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Reveals Hayley Williams and Fall Out Boy Features on New Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Tracklist". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on June 10, 2023. Retrieved June 5, 2023.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h Olivier, Bobby (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift Reimagines Speak Now (Taylor's Version) With An Emo Twist". Spin. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  24. ^ a b Willman, Chris (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift Changes Controversial Lyrics of 'Better Than Revenge' in New 'Taylor's Version' Remake". Variety. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  25. ^ Yahr, Emily (July 7, 2023). "What to know about 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' as it consumes the internet". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  26. ^ a b c "Review: Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Sputnikmusic. July 8, 2023. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h Willman, Chris (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Vault Tracks Review: Key Co-Stars Include Hayley Williams, Fall Out Boy and… Grandmother Marjorie". Variety. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  28. ^ a b c d Berry, Alex (July 10, 2023). "Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Clash. Archived from the original on July 10, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  29. ^ a b c d e f Snapes, Laura (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift: Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review – Re-Recording Project Starting to Feel Wearying and Pointless". The Guardian. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h Sutherland, Mark (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review: Modern Revamp of a Classic". Rolling Stone UK. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  31. ^ a b c Hopper, Alex (July 10, 2023). "Review: Taylor Swift's Speak Now Shines Even Brighter in Hindsight". American Songwriter. Archived from the original on July 10, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  32. ^ a b c d e Nugent, Annabel (July 7, 2023). "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Finds Its Musician At an Old Crossroad – Review". The Independent. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  33. ^ a b c d e Johnston, Maura (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift Expands Our Image of a Landmark Album With Speak Now: Taylor's Version". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  34. ^ a b Caroll, Rachel (July 13, 2023). "Taylor Swift's New 'Speak Now' Nods to the Past". PopMatters. Archived from the original on July 13, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2023.
  35. ^ a b c Lipshutz, Jason (July 7, 2023). "Every 'From The Vault' Song Ranked on Taylor Swift's Speak Now (Taylor's Version): Critic's Picks". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  36. ^ a b c Barnes, Kelsey (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift: Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review – Youth and Growth Collide". The Line of Best Fit. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  37. ^ a b c Jagota, Vrinda (July 12, 2023). "Taylor Swift: Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on July 13, 2023. Retrieved July 12, 2023.
  38. ^ Mier, Tomás (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift (Finally) Announces Speak Now as Next Re-Recording". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  39. ^ Lane, Lexi (March 17, 2023). "Is Taylor Swift's 'If This Was A Movie' From Speak Now?". Uproxx. Archived from the original on March 17, 2023. Retrieved May 8, 2023.
  40. ^ Willman, Chris (May 5, 2023). "Taylor Swift Announces Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Is Coming in July During Concert in Nashville". Variety. Archived from the original on May 6, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  41. ^ Aniftos, Rania (May 18, 2023). "Taylor Swift Reveals Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Lilac Marbled Vinyl". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 20, 2023. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  42. ^ "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) 3LP Orchid Marbled Vinyl". Archived from the original on June 5, 2023. Retrieved June 5, 2023.
  43. ^ Iasimone, Ashley (June 24, 2023). "Taylor Swift's Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Countdown Is On: '13 Days', She Says in New Teaser". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 29, 2023. Retrieved July 6, 2023.
  44. ^ Atkinson, Katie (June 29, 2023). "Taylor Swift Debuts 'Back to December (Taylor's Version)' in New Summer I Turned Pretty Trailer". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 30, 2023. Retrieved June 30, 2023.
  45. ^ Zellers, Ashley (July 7, 2023). "What surprise songs is Taylor Swift playing at Kansas City's Eras Tour concert?". The Kansas City Star. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  46. ^ Hussey, Allison (July 8, 2023). "Taylor Swift Shares New Video for 'I Can See You (Taylor's Version)': Watch". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  47. ^ Willman, Chris (July 8, 2023). "Taylor Swift Casts Her Ex, Taylor Lautner, as Co-Star in 'I Can See You' Video; the Two Tays Reunite on Stage in Kansas City for Premiere". Variety. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  48. ^ Aniftos, Rania (July 13, 2023). "Taylor Swift's Deluxe 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Has Two New Live Tracks". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 13, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2023.
  49. ^ Belaud, Julien (June 9, 2023). "Il vend l'album de Taylor Swift prévu pour septembre 2023 sur Le Bon Coin" [He is selling Taylor Swift's album scheduled for September 2023 on Le Bon Coin]. Ouest-France (in French). Archived from the original on June 13, 2023. Retrieved June 13, 2023.
  50. ^ Gularte, Alejandra (June 13, 2023). "Sorry, You Can't Steal Taylor Swift's Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Twice". Vulture. Archived from the original on June 17, 2023. Retrieved June 17, 2023.
  51. ^ Christ, Kelly (June 16, 2023). "Taylor Swift's new Speak Now (Taylor's Version) vinyls stolen and leaked". Tag24. Archived from the original on June 29, 2023. Retrieved July 5, 2023.
  52. ^ a b "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) by Taylor Swift Reviews". AnyDecentMusic?. Archived from the original on July 15, 2023. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  53. ^ a b "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) by Taylor Swift". Metacritic. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  54. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift - Speak Now [Taylor's Version] Album Reviews, Songs & More". AllMusic. Archived from the original on July 15, 2023. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  55. ^ a b c Platt, Poppie (July 7, 2023). "With Speak Now, Taylor Swift Had Nothing to Be Ashamed Of – So Why Rewrite Her Teenage Lyrics?". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  56. ^ a b c Keefe, Jonathan (July 8, 2023). "Taylor Swift Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review". Slant Magazine. Archived from the original on July 9, 2023. Retrieved July 9, 2023.
  57. ^ a b c Hodgkinson, Will (July 7, 2023). "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review—A Powerful Re-Recording, But Why Change That Lyric?". The Times. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  58. ^ Solomon, Kate (July 7, 2023). "Taylor Swift, Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Review: Her Most Underrated Teenage Album Has A New Lease of Life". i. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  59. ^ Willman, Chris (July 10, 2023). "'Speak Now' Keeps Talking: Taylor Swift Accounts for Nearly Half of Spotify's Top 50, Four Days After Album's Release". Variety. Archived from the original on July 12, 2023. Retrieved July 10, 2023.
  60. ^ @Spotify (July 8, 2023). "We've had the time of our lives breaking records with you 💜 @taylorswift13" (Tweet). Retrieved July 9, 2023 – via Twitter.
  61. ^ Caulfield, Keith (July 23, 2023). "'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Spends Second Week at No. 1 on Billboard 200". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 25, 2023. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  62. ^ Caulfield, Keith (July 11, 2023). "Taylor Swift's Re-Recorded 'Speak Now' Already Has 2023's Biggest Week After 4 Days of Release". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 11, 2023. Retrieved July 11, 2023.
  63. ^ Caulfield, Keith (July 17, 2023). "Taylor Swift Has 11 Albums on the Billboard 200 Chart for the First Time". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 17, 2023. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  64. ^ Caulfield, Keith (July 16, 2023). "Taylor Swift's Re-Recorded 'Speak Now' Debuts at No. 1 on Billboard 200 With 2023's Biggest Week". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 19, 2023. Retrieved July 16, 2023.
  65. ^ Zellner, Xander (July 17, 2023). "All 22 Songs From Taylor Swift's 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Debut on Hot 100". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 17, 2023. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  66. ^ Asker, Jim (July 17, 2023). "Taylor Swift's 'Speak Now (Taylor's Version)' Debuts at No. 1 on Top Country Albums Chart". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 18, 2023. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  67. ^ Smith, Carl (July 14, 2023). "Taylor Swift secures 10th Number 1 album with Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on July 14, 2023. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  68. ^ "Taylor beats Swift". Australian Recording Industry Association. July 14, 2023. Archived from the original on July 14, 2023. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  69. ^ "ARIA Top 50 Singles Chart". Australian Recording Industry Association. July 17, 2023. Archived from the original on July 16, 2023. Retrieved July 16, 2023.
  70. ^ Dailey, Hannah (July 11, 2023). "U.S. Government Debuts 'Speak Now (FBI's Version)' Encouraging Taylor Swift Fans to Report Crimes". Billboard. Archived from the original on July 12, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2023.
  71. ^ Grein, Paul (August 2, 2023). "Grammy Museum at L.A. Live Presents Taylor Swift Pop-Up Exhibit". Billboard. Archived from the original on August 3, 2023. Retrieved August 5, 2023.
  72. ^ Willman, Chris (October 26, 2023). "Taylor Swift, SZA, Morgan Wallen Lead Billboard Music Awards Nominations". Variety. Retrieved November 3, 2023.
  73. ^ "Los discos más vendidos de la semana". Diario de Cultura. Argentine Chamber of Phonograms and Videograms Producers. Archived from the original on August 1, 2023. Retrieved August 1, 2023.
  74. ^ "Australiancharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  75. ^ "ARIA Top 40 Country Albums Chart". Australian Recording Industry Association. July 17, 2023. Archived from the original on July 14, 2023. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  76. ^ "Austriancharts.at – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)" (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved November 14, 2023.
  77. ^ "Ultratop.be – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  78. ^ "Ultratop.be – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)" (in French). Hung Medien. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  79. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Canadian Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  80. ^ "Czech Albums – Top 100". ČNS IFPI. Note: On the chart page, select 28.Týden 2023 on the field besides the words "CZ – ALBUMS – TOP 100" to retrieve the correct chart. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  81. ^ "Danishcharts.dk – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  82. ^ "Dutchcharts.nl – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  83. ^ "Taylor Swift: Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Musiikkituottajat. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  84. ^ "Lescharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  85. ^ "Offiziellecharts.de – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved November 3, 2023.
  86. ^ "Album Top 40 slágerlista – 2023. 28. hét" (in Hungarian). MAHASZ. Retrieved July 20, 2023.
  87. ^ "Tónlistinn – Plötur – Vika 28 – 2023" [The Music – Albums – Week 28 – 2023] (in Icelandic). Plötutíðindi. Archived from the original on July 18, 2023. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  88. ^ "Official Irish Albums Chart Top 50". Official Charts Company. Retrieved September 1, 2023.
  89. ^ "Italiancharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved November 6, 2023.
  90. ^ "Oricon Top 50 Albums: 2023-08-28/p/2" (in Japanese). Oricon. Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  91. ^ "Oricon Top 50 Combined Albums: 2023-08-28" (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on August 25, 2023. Retrieved August 25, 2023.
  92. ^ "Billboard Japan Hot Albums – Week of August 23, 2023". Billboard Japan (in Japanese). Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  93. ^ "2023 28-os savaitės klausomiausi (Top 100)" (in Lithuanian). AGATA. July 14, 2023. Archived from the original on July 16, 2023. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  94. ^ "Charts.nz – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  95. ^ "Norwegiancharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  96. ^ "OLiS - oficjalna lista sprzedaży - albumy" (in Polish). OLiS. Polish Society of the Phonographic Industry. Note: Change the date to 07.07.2023–13.07.2023 under "zmień zakres od–do:". Retrieved July 20, 2023.
  97. ^ "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  98. ^ "SK - Albums Top 100" (in Czech). International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. Archived from the original on July 17, 2023. Retrieved July 17, 2023.
  99. ^ "Spanishcharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 25, 2023.
  100. ^ "Swedishcharts.com – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Hung Medien. Retrieved July 31, 2023.
  101. ^ "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  102. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  103. ^ "Taylor Swift Chart History (Top Country Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved July 18, 2023.
  104. ^ "Ranking Mensual Palacio de la Música (Agosto 2023)" (in Spanish). Uruguayan Chamber of Disc (CUD). Archived from the original on October 1, 2023. Retrieved October 1, 2023.
  105. ^ "ARIA Top 100 Albums Chart for 2023". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved January 12, 2024.
  106. ^ "Jaaroverzichten 2023" (in Dutch). Ultratop. Retrieved January 7, 2024.
  107. ^ "Rapports annuels 2023" (in French). Ultratop. Retrieved January 7, 2024.
  108. ^ "Top Canadian Albums – Year-End 2023". Billboard. Retrieved November 22, 2023.
  109. ^ "Jaaroverzichten – Album 2023". dutchcharts.nl (in Dutch). Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  110. ^ "2023: La dynamique de la production et de la consommation musicales en France" (in French). SNEP. January 8, 2024. Retrieved January 13, 2024.
  111. ^ "Album Top 100 - digitális és fizikai értékesítés alapján - 2023" (in Hungarian). MAHASZ. Archived from the original on January 25, 2024. Retrieved January 25, 2024.
  112. ^ "Top Selling Albums of 2023". Recorded Music NZ. Archived from the original on December 21, 2023. Retrieved December 22, 2023.
  113. ^ "Top 100 Albums Yearly". El portal de Música. Promusicae. Retrieved January 20, 2024.
  114. ^ "End of Year Albums Chart – 2023". Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 3, 2024.
  115. ^ "Billboard 200 Albums – Year-End 2023". Billboard. Retrieved November 21, 2023.
  116. ^ "Top Country Albums – Year-End 2023". Billboard. Retrieved November 22, 2023.
  117. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2023 Albums" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved October 27, 2023.
  118. ^ "New Zealand album certifications – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved October 20, 2023.
  119. ^ "British album certifications – Taylor Swift – Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved July 14, 2023.
  120. ^ Swift, Taylor (July 7, 2023). "Speak Now (Taylor's Version)". Apple Music. Archived from the original on June 5, 2023. Retrieved June 5, 2023.
  121. ^ Speak Now (Taylor's Version) release formats:
  122. ^ "Speak Now (Taylor's Version) Deluxe Digital Album". Taylor Swift Official Store. Archived from the original on July 13, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2023.
  123. ^ "スピーク・ナウ(テイラーズ・ヴァージョン)[CD] - テイラー・スウィフト" [Speak Now (Taylor's Version) [CD] - Taylor Swift] (in Japanese). Universal Music Japan. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.
  124. ^ "スピーク・ナウ(テイラーズ・ヴァージョン) [デラックス・エディション] [CD] - テイラー・スウィフト" [Speak Now (Taylor's Version) (Deluxe Edition) [CD] - Taylor Swift] (in Japanese). Universal Music Japan. Archived from the original on July 7, 2023. Retrieved July 7, 2023.


External links[edit]