Taylor Swift (album)

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Taylor Swift
A portrait of Swift in curly blonde hair against a blue-and-green background
Studio album by
ReleasedOctober 24, 2006 (2006-10-24)
Recorded2005
Studio
Genre
Length40:28
LabelBig Machine
Producer
Taylor Swift chronology
Taylor Swift
(2006)
The Taylor Swift Holiday Collection
(2007)
Singles from Taylor Swift
  1. "Tim McGraw"
    Released: June 19, 2006
  2. "Teardrops on My Guitar"
    Released: February 19, 2007[1]
  3. "Our Song"
    Released: September 9, 2007[1]
  4. "Picture to Burn"
    Released: February 3, 2008[2]
  5. "Should've Said No"
    Released: May 18, 2008[3]

Taylor Swift is the self-titled debut studio album by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift. It was released on October 24, 2006, through Big Machine Records.

Swift had relocated from Pennsylvania to Tennessee in 2004, at fourteen years old, to pursue a career as a country singer-songwriter. She signed with Sony/ATV Tree publishing house, and signed with Big Machine Records in 2005, to work on her debut album during her first high school year. Of the eleven songs that made the cut, Swift has sole writing credits on three, and co-writing credits on the remaining with Robert Ellis Orrall, Brian Maher, Angelo Petraglia, and Liz Rose. The album was produced by Orall and Nathan Chapman, the latter of whom has sole production credits on all but one track, "The Outside".

The lyrics are about Swift's perspectives on life as a teenager, dealing with romantic relationships, friendships, and insecurity. The album primarily features elements of country music with pop and pop rock flavors, and incorporates acoustic instruments such as guitars, banjos, and fiddles. Critics commented the album's pop crossover sound laid the groundwork to Swift's subsequent country pop discography. Five singles supported Taylor Swift, including the pop radio crossover "Teardrops on My Guitar", and the Hot Country Songs number-one singles "Our Song" and "Should've Said No". Swift promoted the album by communicating with her audiences through Myspace, embarking on a six-month radio tour in 2006, and opening tours for other country artists throughout 2006 and 2007.

Critics praised the album's mainstream sensibility and Swift's songwriting abilities at a young age. Taylor Swift was nominated for Album of the Year at the 2008 Academy of Country Music Awards and helped Swift earn accolades including a Grammy nomination for Best New Artist. The album topped the US Billboard Top Country Albums chart for twenty-four weeks, and was the longest-charting album on the Billboard 200 of the 2000s decade. Certified 7× Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), it made Swift the first solo female country artist to write or co-write every song on a platinum debut album. Journalists attributed Taylor Swift's success to Swift's online marketing atypical of traditional radio promotion, which ushered in a younger demographic in country audiences who had been mainly consisted of middle-aged listeners.

Background[edit]

Taylor Swift developed an early interest in the performing arts.[4][5] After watching a documentary about country singer Faith Hill, Swift felt sure she needed to move to Nashville, Tennessee—the capital of country music—to pursue a career as a country singer.[6] At age eleven, Swift traveled to Nashville with her mother to pitch demo tapes of karaoke covers to record labels for a record deal.[7][8] She was rejected because record labels believed country music's middle-aged demographic would not listen music by a teenage girl, which Swift firmly disbelieved.[9][10] Swift recalled that the record labels did not take her seriously because of her young age: "Basically [they] all went, 'Ah, how cute ... Go home and come back when you're 18.' "[10]

Returning to her home town in Pennsylvania, Swift realized she had to distinguish herself from other aspiring country singers.[9] To this end, at age twelve, she learned to play the guitar with the help of a computer repairman who had fixed her family's computer on one occasion, and began writing songs herself.[10] Swift's love for country music alienated her from her peers.[11] Her performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the 2003 US open caught the attention of music manager Dan Dymtrow, who helped thirteen-year-old Swift get an artist development deal with RCA Records in Nashville.[12] To assist Swift's artistic endeavors, her father transferred to a job position in Nashville, and her family relocated to Hendersonville, a city close to Nashville, in 2004.[13][14]

Development and production[edit]

Among Swift's inspirations were 1990s female country musicians—Shania Twain, the Dixie Chicks, Faith Hill, and LeAnn Rimes, the lattermost of whom Swift described as her first impression of country music; Rimes's success in her early teens inspired Swift to follow the same path.[15] She signed with the Sony/ATV Tree publishing house at age fourteen to become a professional songwriter, the youngest signee in its history.[16] After the signing, Swift commuted from Hendersonville to Nashville every afternoon to practice writing with experienced Music Row songwriters.[17] Among those whom Swift worked with, Liz Rose became an important collaborator and formed a lasting working relationship with Swift in her future career.[18] Swift had productive sessions with Rose because she respected her vision and did not want to put her in the "Nashville cookie-cutter songwriting mold".[19] They met for two-hour writing sessions every Tuesday afternoon after school.[20] Rose spoke highly of Swift's songwriting abilities: "Basically, I was just her editor. ... She had such a clear vision of what she was trying to say. And she'd come in with the most incredible hooks."[21]

After performing original songs at a RCA Records showcase, Swift was held off an official record deal, as the label was not confident in Swift's self-written material.[22] RCA wanted to wait until Swift turned eighteen and recorded songs written by other songwriters.[23] She decided to part ways with RCA: "I figured if they didn't believe in me then, they weren't ever going to believe in me."[12] She recalled in 2009 on The Daily Telegraph: "I genuinely felt that I was running out of time. I wanted to capture these years of my life on an album while they still represented what I was going through."[24] At an industry showcase at Nashville's Bluebird Cafe in 2005, Swift caught the attention of Scott Borchetta, a DreamWorks Records executive who was preparing to form an independent record label, Big Machine Records. She had first met Borchetta in 2004.[25] Swift became one of Big Machine's first signings, and her father purchased a three-percent stake in the company.[26]

Of the eleven songs that made the cut of the album's standard edition, Swift is the sole writer of three, and a co-writer of eight. Rose shares the writing credit on seven. Robert Ellis Orrall and Angelo Petraglia co-wrote "A Place in This World", and Brian Maher co-wrote "Mary's Song (Oh My My My)".[27] Big Machine presented Swift with potential record producers to record Taylor Swift.[8] After experimenting with different producers, Swift persuaded Big Machine to recruit Nathan Chapman, who had produced her demo album in a "little shed" behind the publishing company Swift was at.[8] Big Machine was skeptical about hiring Chapman because he had never produced a commercially released studio album, but ultimately accepted because Swift felt they had the "right chemistry".[8] Before approaching Chapman, Swift conceptualized what her songs should sound like: "I know exactly where I want the hook to be and ... what instruments I want to use."[28] Chapman was confident in Swift's abilities, saying that she "knows what she wants to say with her music".[28] He has sole production credits on all songs but one, "The Outside", on which he is credited as an additional producer, and Orrall as the main producer.[8] Recording took place during a four-month period before 2005 was over.[8] When the recording and production wrapped, Swift had finished her first high school year.[29]

Composition[edit]

Lyrics[edit]

Swift wrote Taylor Swift from her personal life experiences as a teenager. While she adhered to the confessional songwriting associated with country music, she did not write about stereotypical themes such as "tractors and hay bales because that's not really the way I grew up".[30] She instead wrote about her observations and reflections on matters from romantic relationships to friendships, striving to convey her teenage perspectives as honest and personal as possible.[31] Because her inspirations came from immediate feelings and emotions, Swift wrote songs anytime and anywhere, from studio sessions to school breaks.[18] The result is straightforward lyrics, which The Daily Telegraph noted to be "brimmed with an earnest naiveté".[32]

The songs on Taylor Swift are from the perspectives of a girl in an American small town, within the extends from high school hallways to rural backroads, which fosters a contemplative nature.[33] Most songs on the album are about romantic relationships, some of which were based on Swift's observations rather than real experiences.[8][17] The lead single and first track, "Tim McGraw", was inspired by Swift's relationship with a senior boyfriend during her first year of high school. The song is about Swift's hope that the boyfriend, after ending the relationship and leaving for college, would reminisce her every time he hears their mutual favorite Tim McGraw song;[34] according to Swift, "Tim McGraw" was inspired by McGraw's 2004 song "Can't Tell Me Nothin' ".[35] Swift wrote "Our Song" for her high school talent show.[36] She talked about the inspiration: "I wrote it about this guy I was dating, and how we didn't have a song. So I went ahead and wrote us one."[37]

The songs "Picture to Burn" and "Should've Said No" depict a vengeful attitude toward those who do not reciprocate the protagonist's feelings;[40] on "Picture to Burn", Swift sings about burning photographic evidence of an ex-boyfriend's existence.[41] The original version included the lyrics, "Go and tell your friends that I'm obsessive and crazy / That's fine; I'll tell mine you're gay."[39] On the radio edit and subsequent versions, Swift modified the lyric to "That's fine; You won't mind if I say."[42] Heartbreak is another aspect Swift explored—"Teardrops on My Guitar" was about her experience with a classmate whom she had feelings for, but this classmate was in love with someone else.[41] On "Cold as You", Swift laments a fruitless relationship: "I've never been anywhere cold as you." She said it was her favorite song lyrically on the album: "I love a line in a song where afterward you're just like... burn."[39]

On other songs, Swift sings about insecurity and self-consciousness. "The Outside", which Swift wrote at age twelve, describes the loneliness she felt when her love of country music alienated her from her peers.[43] In a similar sentiment, "A Place in This World" expresses Swift's uncertainty about where she truly belongs.[33] Swift wrote "Tied Together with a Smile" the day she learned one of her best friends had an eating disorder.[44] The lyrics describe a girl hiding her inner turbulence; Swift commented, "I always thought that one of the biggest overlooked problems American girls face is insecurity."[44]

Music[edit]

Musically, Taylor Swift incorporates country music elements, including twang vocal delivery and acoustic instruments such as fiddles, guitars, and banjos.[33][38] According to Rose, Chapman's production was a distinctive sound that was hard to categorize into a particular genre; Big Machine marketed the album to country radio regardless.[19] Reviews from The Palm Beach Post and the Chicago Tribune categorized Taylor Swift as country music.[46][47]

Elements of crossover pop are apparent on many songs.[48] In retrospective articles, critics disagreed on whether the Taylor Swift songs are country. Jon Caramanica from The New York Times called it a "pop-minded country" album,[49] while Rolling Stone critic Chuck Eddy observed that Taylor Swift blended "pop-rock and Dixie Chicks-style twang".[50] Another album review on Rolling Stone, meanwhile, felt the songs were inflected with rock.[51] Grady Smith from the same magazine listed the singles "Tim McGraw", "Teardrops on My Guitar", "Our Song", and "Picture to Burn" among Swift's "countriest songs", which evoke "classic country" in terms of instrumentation, themes, and song structure.[52] J. Freedom du Lac from The Washington Post noted that the "rhythmic, rap-influenced phrasing" on "Our Song" was atypical to country music.[53]

James E. Perone, an academic in music, cited "Tim McGraw" as an example of Swift's crossover appeal. "Tim McGraw" follows the I-vi-IV-V chord progression, which is typically found in late-1950s and early-1960s rock and roll. The refrain consists of repeated motives built within a small pitch range, which gives the song a catchy tune. Additionally, the refrain—and to a lesser degree, the verses—makes heavy use of syncopation at the sixteenth-note level, which brings about a production reminiscent to non-country genres such as alternative rock and hip hop. Perone argued that these melodic qualities laid the groundwork to Swift's pop radio-friendly discography enjoyed by both pop and country audiences.[45]

Release and promotion[edit]

A young female with curly blond hair faces down at an acoustic guitar made of koa wood while a large microphone is placed close to her. She is wearing patterned, red dress.
Swift performing at a local restaurant in Santa Monica, California, in 2006

Taylor Swift was released on October 24, 2006, through Big Machine Records.[54] Swift was involved in the album packaging, designing doodle graphics herself.[27] She included hidden messages with hints at the subjects of her songs in the liner notes, a technique that she also executed on her subsequent albums.[32][55] Swift said the messages could be interpreted by tracking the capital letters in the order they appear in the lyrics printed in the liner notes.[8] In addition to the eleven-track standard edition, a fifteen-track deluxe edition contains three new original songs—"I'm Only Me When I'm with You", "Invisible", and "A Perfectly Good Heart", and an alternate version of "Teardrops on My Guitar".[56] An "enhanced version", which includes the music videos for "Teardrops on My Guitar" and "Tim McGraw", was released on March 18, 2008.[57]

The album was preceded by the lead single "Tim McGraw", which was released on June 19, 2006.[58] The single peaked at number 40 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number six on the Hot Country Songs chart, marking Swift's debut appearance on both charts.[59][60] It was certified double platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA).[61] Swift promoted the album performing on televised programs including Good Morning America,[62] The Megan Mullally Show,[62] America's Got Talent,[63] Total Request Live,[64] the CMT Music Awards,[65] and the Academy of Country Music Awards.[66] To maintain her presence on country radio, Swift embarked on a radio tour during a six-month run in 2006.[8] Swift also promoted the album by performing as an opening act for other country artists' concert tours. She opened for Rascal Flatts from October 19 to November 3, 2006.[62] Throughout 2007, she opened for George Strait,[67] Brad Paisley,[68] and Tim McGraw and Faith Hill's joint tour, Soul2Soul II Tour.[69]

In addition to traditional radio promotion, Swift extensively used her Myspace profile to communicate with her audiences, sharing her daily blogs and song information. Her online marketing strategy boosted the album's popularity among teenagers and young adults.[23] Swift and Big Machine decided to release "Our Song" as a single because of the positive feedback it received on Myspace.[23] Throughout 2007 and 2008, four more singles supported Taylor Swift: "Teardrops on My Guitar", "Our Song", "Picture to Burn", and "Should've Said No", all of which peaked within the top forty of the Hot 100 and the top ten of the Hot Country Songs chart.[70] "Teardrops on My Guitar" peaked at number two on the Hot Country Songs chart and had a crossover release to pop radio; it peaked at number seven on the Mainstream Top 40 (Pop Songs) chart, and number 13 on the Hot 100.[71][72] "Our Song" and "Should've Said No" reached number one on the Hot Country Songs chart.[70] With "Our Song", Swift became the youngest person to single-handedly write and sing a Hot Country Songs number one.[73] All singles were certified platinum or more by the RIAA, with "Teardrops on My Guitar" (3× Platinum) and "Our Song" (4× Platinum) selling over three million copies each.[61][74]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3.5/5 stars[75]
Robert Christgau(choice cut)[76]
Country Weekly3.5/5 stars[77]
The Palm Beach Post4/5 stars[46]
Pitchfork6.7/10[38]
The Philadelphia Inquirer3/4 stars[78]
PopMatters6/10[79]
Rolling Stone3/5 stars[51]

Taylor Swift received generally positive reviews from critics, who praised Swift's keen observations and perspectives in her songwriting.[80] In a review for Country Weekly, Chris Neal deemed Swift a success compared to previous aspiring teenage country singers because of her "honesty, intelligence and idealism".[77] Reviewers were impressed by Swift's maturity while retaining a sense of youthful innocence in her lyrics, including Ken Rosenbaum of The Toledo Blade,[81] Nick Cristiano of The Philadelphia Inquirer,[78] Jeff Tamarkin of AllMusic,[75] and Rolling Stone.[51] In a review for The Palm Beach Post, James Fontaine felt Swift's honest depiction of her teenage experience made the album compelling, and lauded the "musical maturity" for effectively communicating the sentiments.[46]

Critics commented on the album's pop sensibility—Neal and Rolling Stone found it appealing to a mainstream audience.[51][77] Tamarkin commented that Swift's "considerably strong voice" straddled the precarious boundary between country and pop, and criticized producer Chapman for applying "a gloss that not all [songs] really require".[75] In the Chicago Tribune, Chrissie Dickinson described Taylor Swift as "a slick package, pleasant enough but devoid of anything resembling gritty traction".[47] In a mixed review for PopMatters, Roger Holland complimented the production quality of certain tracks, but deemed the album overall a misstep for Swift's true appeal: "It's to be hoped that when she finds both her place and her full grown voice, she's able to find an accommodation between the country tradition and her very obvious pop sensibilities."[79] Robert Christgau rated the album a "cut" score ((choice cut)), and selected "Tim McGraw" and "Picture to Burn" as highlights.[76][note 1]

Retrospective reviews have remained favorable toward Swift's early songwriting abilities. Maura Johnston from Pitchfork described the album as an honest record about teenage perspectives, which set Swift apart from the manufactured albums that "weighed down former teen sensations".[38] Jonathan Bradley from Billboard lauded how Swift captured immediate emotions and feelings with "details... so sharp at so small a scale".[33] Swift received accolades for Taylor Swift, including a nomination for New Female Vocalist of the Year at the 2007 Academy of Country Music Awards, a Horizon Award for Best New Artist win at the 2007 Country Music Association Awards, and a nomination for Best New Artist at the 2008 Grammy Awards.[54][83] The album received a nomination for Album of the Year at the 2008 Academy of Country Music Awards.[84]

Commercial performance[edit]

Taylor Swift enjoyed commercial success in the United States.[17] It debuted at number nineteen on the Billboard 200 chart dated November 11, 2006, with first-week sales of 40,000 copies.[85] Since albums often dropped in sales after its initial release, Swift did not expect her album to remain long on the chart: "I would be incredibly lucky to see this album certified Gold."[17] Contrary to her expectations, Taylor Swift kept selling at a fairly consistent pace.[17] By November 2007, the album had sold one million copies.[86] It reached its highest sales week on the Billboard 200 chart dated January 5, 2008, when it sold 187,000 copies and charted at number eight.[87]

The album reached its peak at number five on the chart dated January 19, 2008, sixty-three weeks after its debut week.[88] Spending 157 weeks on the Billboard 200 by October 2009, Taylor Swift marked the longest stay on the chart by any album released in the 2000s decade.[89] It had spent a total of 275 weeks on the chart by November 2014.[1] On Billboard's Top Country Albums chart, Taylor Swift peaked at number one for twenty-four non-consecutive weeks.[90] By October 2020, the album had sold 5.75 million copies in the United States.[91] It was certified seven times Platinum by the RIAA for seven album-equivalent units.[92]

In Canada, Taylor Swift peaked at number fourteen on the Canadian Albums Chart[93] and was certified Platinum by Music Canada (MC).[94] The album peaked at number thirty-three on the Australian Albums Chart in March 2010,[95] and was certified Platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA).[96] The album peaked at number eighty-one on the UK Albums Chart[97] and was certified Gold by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) for sales of more than 100,000 copies.[98] The album had sold 167,000 copies in the United Kingdom by August 2019.[99] It appeared on albums charts in New Zealand (peaking at number thirty-eight),[100] Japan (fifty-three),[101] Ireland (fifty-nine)[102] and Scotland (seventy-one).[103]

Impact and legacy[edit]

Ms. Swift ... has quickly established herself as the most remarkable country music breakthrough artist of the decade. In part that's because ... [her] career has been noteworthy for what happens once the songs are finished. She has aggressively used online social networks to stay connected with her young audience in a way that ... is proving to be revolutionary in country music, ... helping country reach a new audience.

Jon Caramanica, The New York Times (2008)[71]

Taylor Swift was released in a time when female country artists were gaining momentum in popularity.[38][51] However, Swift's debut as a teenager was met with disapproval from some Nashville industry experts,[13][19] because the album's adolescent themes were considered inappropriate for country music's middle-aged key demographic.[70][104] Contrary to initial expectations, Jim Malec of American Songwriter observed that Taylor Swift's success on country radio, particularly with the track "Our Song", established Swift as one of the few teenage female artists to be equally successful with male counterparts in a format dominated by men.[70]

While the album raised questions on whether Swift's music could categorize as country,[105] Rolling Stone remarked that following the Dixie Chicks' 2003 controversy, which left "a huge space opened up in the heart of the country audience", Swift "has completely filled it ... with a sound that's not just rock-informed but teen-poppy too".[51] Jon Caramanica of The New York Times observed that, although the country-pop crossover sound was facilitated by previous successful singers, Swift was the first country artist to embrace the status of a pop star.[71] The album made her the first female solo artist in country music to write or co-write every song on a platinum-certified debut album.[73][106]

Music journalists attributed the album's success to Swift's songwriting and online marketing strategy.[13] While online promotion was familiar to pop and hip hop artists, she was the first country artist to promote her songs on social media services like Myspace;[70][71] she also relied on social media to promote her subsequent releases, which brought her a loyal fan base.[104][107] Her social media presence ushered in a younger audience consisted of mostly teenage girls who listened to country music—a previously unheard demographic.[13] The autobiographical narratives on Taylor Swift defined Swift's songwriting over the next decade,[32][33] which Billboard noted to inspire a new generation of aspiring singer-songwriters who compose their own songs.[104] The album's pop crossover sound laid the groundwork to Swift's country-pop discography, whose chart success straddled the perceived boundary between the two genres.[105][108][109]

Track listing[edit]

Taylor Swift – Standard edition[27]
No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
1."Tim McGraw"Nathan Chapman3:54
2."Picture to Burn"
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman2:55
3."Teardrops on My Guitar"
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman3:35
4."A Place in This World"Chapman3:22
5."Cold as You"
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman4:01
6."The Outside"Swift
3:29
7."Tied Together with a Smile"
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman4:11
8."Stay Beautiful"
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman3:58
9."Should've Said No"SwiftChapman4:04
10."Mary's Song (Oh My My My)"
  • Swift
  • Rose
  • Brian Maher
Chapman3:35
11."Our Song"SwiftChapman3:24
Total length:40:28
Best Buy digital download (bonus track)[110]
No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
1."I Heart ?"SwiftOrrall3:15
Enhanced edition (bonus videos)[111]
No.TitleLength
1."Tim McGraw"4:00
2."Taylor's Grand Ole Opry Debut"2:56
Deluxe edition (bonus tracks)[112]
No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
12."I'm Only Me When I'm with You"
  • Swift
  • Orrall
  • Petraglia
  • Orrall
  • Petraglia
3:35
13."Invisible"
  • Swift
  • Orrall
Orrall3:26
14."A Perfectly Good Heart"
  • James
  • Verges
3:42
15."Taylor Swift's 1st Phone Call with Tim McGraw"  4:44
International edition (bonus tracks)[113]
No.TitleWriter(s)Producer(s)Length
12."I'm Only Me When I'm with You"
  • Swift
  • Orrall
  • Petraglia
  • Orrall
  • Petraglia
3:35
13."Invisible"
  • Swift
  • Orrall
Orrall3:26
14."A Perfectly Good Heart"
  • Swift
  • James
  • Verges
  • James
  • Verges
3:42
15."Teardrops on My Guitar" (Pop Version)
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman2:58
Deluxe edition (bonus DVD)[112]
No.TitleLength
1."Tim McGraw" (music video)4:00
2."Tim McGraw" (Live at Grand Ole Opry)2:56
3."Tim McGraw" (Live at Yahoo! Music)4:05
4."Teardrops on My Guitar" (music video)3:45
5."Teardrops on My Guitar" (behind the scenes)4:16
6."Our Song" (music video)3:30
7."Our Song" (behind the scenes)11:30
8."A Place in This World" (GAC Short Cut series)21:48
9."Picture to Burn" (CMT's unplugged at 330 sessions video performance)3:14
10."Taylor's Home Movie"5:40
Target deluxe edition (bonus DVD)[114]
No.TitleLength
11."Taylor's Performance on the Tim McGraw and Faith Hill Tour 2007"10:12
2008 enhanced edition (bonus tracks)[57]
No.TitleWriter(s)ProducerLength
15."Teardrops on My Guitar" (Pop Version)
  • Swift
  • Rose
Chapman2:58
2008 enhanced edition (bonus videos)[57]
No.TitleLength
1."Tim McGraw"4:00
2."Teardrops on My Guitar"3:45

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the album's liner notes[27]

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Peak chart positions for Taylor Swift
Chart (2006–2012) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[95] 33
Australian Country Albums (ARIA)[115] 3
Canadian Albums (Billboard)[93] 14
Irish Albums (IRMA)[102] 59
Japanese Albums (Oricon)[101] 53
New Zealand Albums (RMNZ)[100] 38
Scottish Albums (OCC)[103] 71
UK Albums (OCC)[97] 81
US Billboard 200[116] 5
US Top Country Albums (Billboard)[117] 1

Certifications and sales[edit]

Certifications for Taylor Swift, with pure sales where available
Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[96] Platinum 70,000^
Canada (Music Canada)[94] Platinum 100,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[98] Gold 167,000[99]
United States (RIAA)[92] 7× Platinum 5,750,000[91]

^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

Release history[edit]

Release formats for Taylor Swift
Region Date Edition Format Label Ref.
United States October 24, 2006 Standard Big Machine [131]
November 6, 2007 Deluxe CD+DVD [132]
United States March 18, 2008 Enhanced CD [57]
Australia October 4, 2008 International
[133]
New Zealand [134]
Germany March 8, 2009 [113]
United Kingdom August 3, 2009 Virgin EMI [135]
Japan June 30, 2010 Universal [136]
Deluxe CD+DVD [137]
United States November 18, 2016 International / Deluxe LP Big Machine [138]
Germany [139]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In Robert Christgau's rating, a "cut" ((choice cut)) means "a good song on an album that isn't worth your time or money".[82]
  2. ^ Chapman is credited as an additional producer.

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Taylor Swift's Career Timeline: From 'Tim McGraw' to '1989'". Billboard. November 4, 2014. Archived from the original on May 22, 2018. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  2. ^ "R&R :: Going For Adds :: Country (Week Of: February 3, 2008)". Radio & Records. Archived from the original on August 28, 2013. Retrieved May 19, 2018.
  3. ^ "Should've Said No (Single)". Big Machine Label Group. Archived from the original on July 15, 2015. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  4. ^ Macpherson, Alex (October 18, 2012). "Taylor Swift: 'I want to believe in pretty lies'". The Guardian. Retrieved October 18, 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Rare photos of Taylor Swift before fame". New York Daily News. Retrieved April 3, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Diu, Nisha Lilia (April 3, 2011). "Taylor Swift: 'I won't do sexy shoots'". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on May 6, 2013. Retrieved April 17, 2012.
  7. ^ "CMT Insider Interview: Taylor Swift (Part 1 of 2)". CMT News. November 26, 2008. Archived from the original on January 23, 2015. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Morris, Edward (December 1, 2006). "When She Thinks 'Tim McGraw,' Taylor Swift Savors Payoff: Hardworking Teen to Open for George Strait Next Year". CMT News. Archived from the original on December 29, 2018. Retrieved March 11, 2010.
  9. ^ a b Malec, Jim (May 2, 2011). "Taylor Swift: The Garden In The Machine". American Songwriter. Archived from the original on May 10, 2012. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c Spencer 2010, p. 7.
  11. ^ Spencer 2010, p. 9.
  12. ^ a b Spencer 2010, p. 12.
  13. ^ a b c d Widdicombe, Lizzie (October 10, 2011). "You Belong With Me". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on July 24, 2014. Retrieved October 11, 2011.
  14. ^ Jo, Nancy (January 2, 2014). "Taylor Swift and the Growing of a Superstar: Her Men, Her Moods, Her Music". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on November 10, 2015. Retrieved November 11, 2015.
  15. ^ Spencer 2010, pp. 16–18.
  16. ^ DeLuca, Dan (November 11, 2008). "Focused on 'great songs' Taylor Swift isn't thinking about 'the next level' or Joe Jon as gossip". The Philadelphia Inquirer. p. 1. Archived from the original on November 18, 2012. Retrieved April 17, 2012.
  17. ^ a b c d e Malec, Jim (May 2, 2011). "Taylor Swift: The Garden In The Machine". American Songwriter. p. 3. Archived from the original on August 7, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2012.
  18. ^ a b Spencer 2010, p. 19.
  19. ^ a b c Kosser, Michael (June 3, 2010). "Liz Rose: Co-Writer to the Stars". American Songwriter. Retrieved February 20, 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ Leahey, Andrew (October 24, 2014). "Songwriter Spotlight: Liz Rose". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 26, 2016. Retrieved September 24, 2016.
  21. ^ Spencer 2010, p. 21.
  22. ^ Kotb, Hoda (May 31, 2009). "On tour with Taylor Swift". NBC News. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
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